Streams

Emily Vinson

Emily is a graduate of the School of Information of the University of Texas at Austin and an alumnus of the New York Public Library IMLS Preservation Fellowship, where she worked closely with the audio and moving image archivists at the Performing Arts Library. Before coming to New York Public Radio in 2010, Emily worked with the Pacifica Radio Archives on the preservation planning and assessment of civil rights-era materials for the American Archive pilot. From 2010-2012, Emily was responsible for digitizing hundreds of hours of archival audio as part of the NEH-funded Municipal Archives WNYC Sound Collection project. 

Emily Vinson appears in the following:

Brighter Than 100 Suns: Preparing for Nuclear Attack in New York City, 1951

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Five years after the U.S. Army Air Force dropped atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Cold War-era New York officials were preparing for the worst case scenario, an atomic bomb detonation over New York City.

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Titanic: 'A Night to Remember,' 1956

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

One hundred years after the sinking of the British passenger liner RMS Titanic, the tragic story of the unsinkable ship fascinates as much today as it did on that fateful day, April 15, 1912. Though many today are most familiar with James Cameron’s 1997 blockbuster film "Titanic,"  the story was first mass-popularized by acclaimed author Walter Lord, whose 1955 book A Night to Remember was drawn from first-hand accounts of 63 survivors on that maiden voyage.

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Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 1964

Monday, January 16, 2012

On December 17, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King was honored by the people of New York for his unparalleled contributions to the civil rights movement in a City Hall ceremony presentation of the Medallion of Honor.

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The Holiday Party the Cold War Hijacked

Friday, December 23, 2011

On December 27, 1951, the Brownsville Boy's Club hosted  5,000 children to an inter-faith party at the 106th Regiment Armory in Brooklyn. 

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1964 World's Fair Hall of Science

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Seven years after Sputnik 1 was launched into orbit, and just six weeks after the U.S. space probe Ranger 7 sent back the first close range photos of the moon, civic leaders and Nobel Laureates gathered in Flushing Meadow, Queens, on a hot September day in 1964 to dedicate the World's Fair Hall of Sciences as a permanent structure committed to science education and exploration in New York City.

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Frontiers in Genetics, 1949

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

This week's Studio 360, "Making Better People," takes a look at man's preoccupation with improving man. Featuring interviews with Greg Stock, author of Redesigning Humans: Our Inevitable Genetic Future, and others, the program considers how we might better nature through engineering. Meanwhile, in the Archives we found a WNYC program exploring the same topic ...almost exactly sixty-two years earlier.

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Remembering Eleanor, 1962

Monday, November 07, 2011

Forty-nine years ago today activist, politician and former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt passed away at the age of 78. An outspoken advocate of civil rights, the Chairman of the President's Commission on the Status of Women and a former delegate to the United Nations General Assembly, Mrs. Roosevelt spent her final years speaking to groups around the country and raising money for various charitable organizations.

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United Nations Day, 1949

Monday, October 24, 2011

Celebrated each year on October 24, United Nations Day commemorates the day in 1945 when the UN Charter was made effective. United Nations Day was first celebrated in 1948, and in 1949 the cornerstone of the United Nations building between First Avenue and the East River was laid. Among those present to mark the event were Carlos P. Romulo, President of the General Assembly, Secretary General Trygve Lie, President Harry Truman and New York City Mayor William O'Dywer.

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Around New York

Thursday, October 20, 2011

WNYC and WQXR kicked off our fall pledge drive on Monday, and among the tote bags and mugs offered as premiums there appears a charming poster from the Archives (with thanks to the New York Transit Museum). The poster, which originally appeared in the city's subways, was designed in the early 1950s by the illustrator Oppy. Set against the city skyline and WNYC's then-home, the Municipal building, the poster promotes the show "Around New York."

 

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Dedication of Frederick Douglass Circle, 1950

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Community leaders gathered this past Tuesday to dedicate a statue of 19th century social reformer and abolitionist  Frederick Douglass.

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Overseas Press Club: Dickey Chapelle, 1964

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Pioneering woman photojournalist is heard over WNYC!

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"The Bid was Four Hearts," the story of the Four Chaplains

Monday, May 30, 2011

The story of the Four Chaplains seems largely unknown now, but throughout the 1940’s and 50’s their story served as a symbol of bravery and sacrifice to many. In 1948, February 3rd was declared Four Chaplains Day by a unanimous vote of Congress, and the chaplains were mentioned in President Eisenhower’s famous 1953 “Back to God” speech. The docudrama presented here originally aired on Memorial Day 1950.

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Books are Basic, 1952

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

This week we celebrate National Library Week, an event close to the hearts of Annotations’ archivists. Since we're both graduates of library school and avid readers, delving into the collection for some library-related audio was a no-brainer for us. The only difficulty came in choosing which instance of library radio to select. From a World War II-era discussion of book burning in Germany to public library dedications through all five boroughs, libraries play a notable role in the historic WNYC collection.

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Headlines in Chemistry, 1948

Monday, March 28, 2011

“Headlines in Chemistry” premiered on WNYC in 1947. Produced in cooperation with the American Chemical Society’s News Service, the show aimed to "present a program of interest to the lay public on the latest scientific developments in the chemical fields." Within four years the show was carried on about 80 stations nationwide [1], and by 1952 it was "beamed overseas in 42 languages [2].”

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Archives Mixtape: Please No Squeeze the Banana, 1946

Friday, March 11, 2011

Undoubtedly readers of the Annotations blog have been waiting with bated breath for the next installment of the Archives Mixtape, and we are happy to oblige with a double feature!

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Soups with "How Does Your Kitchen Fare" 1946

Friday, January 21, 2011

During the fall of 1946, the American Women's Voluntary Services produced a program for WNYC titled “How Does Your Kitchen Fare,” aimed at helping housewives to make nourishing and economical meals, despite post-war food shortages.  The AWVS, founded by Alice Throckmorton McLean, was modeled after the British Women's Voluntary Services. During the war years the organization aided the war effort by sewing garments for servicemen, the members were also trained in "first aid, air raid and war gas work, home nursing and evacuation procedures." (The New York Times, Oct 20, 1940)

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A "Pals of the P.A.L." Christmas, 1949

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Throughout the 1940’s WNYC aired a program titled Pals of the P.A.L., a youth-oriented variety show in cooperation with the Police Athletic League (P.A.L.).

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The Story of "Silent Night," c. 1945

Thursday, December 23, 2010

In this 1945 WNYC broadcast, Austrian born Marie Lemmermeyer tells the “one true story of 'Silent Night'.”

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Operation Santa Claus, 1948

Saturday, December 18, 2010

On Christmas Eve 1948, three lucky children flew to Montreal, where they met Santa Claus and escorted him back to New York to deliver presents to the City's children.

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Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus

Wednesday, December 08, 2010

In 1897, an 8-year-old girl from the Upper West Side wrote to the New York Sun asking if Santa was real, and the response, heard here, became "the most reprinted newspaper editorial."
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