Mary Louise Kelly

Mary Louise Kelly appears in the following:

The Original DREAMer Recalls 'All Pervasive' Fear As An Undocumented Child

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

The DREAM Act all started with Tereza Lee. As Congress prepares to vote on immigration this week, she discusses her journey as an undocumented child and her views on the current moment.

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Migrant Children Heard Crying On Tape Are The Voices 'Left Out' Of Conversation

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border and held at a Border Patrol facility are heard wailing inconsolably in seven minutes of audio obtained by ProPublica.

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Mister Rogers Talked Frankly With Kids About 'Grown-Up' Issues That Weren't

Friday, June 08, 2018

Filmmaker Morgan Neville says he gets asked one question more than any other: Was Fred Rogers as nice as he appeared on TV? Won't You Be My Neighbor? answers that question with an emphatic yes.

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In Bill Clinton's New Thriller, A (Fictional) President Faces Impeachment

Monday, June 04, 2018

The President Is Missing follows a commander in chief trying to thwart a cyberattack — and not lose his job. Clinton co-wrote the book with best-selling author James Patterson.

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Advice For 'Grown-Ups' In Their 40s: 'Just Do What You Want More Often'

Thursday, May 31, 2018

Author Pamela Druckerman says she's reached a "now-or-never phase of life." Her new book There Are No Grown-Ups is a coming-of-age story — for people whose age is 40.

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Arquette: After Rejecting Weinstein, 'I Had A Completely Different Career'

Thursday, May 31, 2018

Rosanna Arquette, one of the first actresses to come forward regarding a sexually abusive encounter with movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, says the charges against him aren't the result of a witch hunt.

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Chef Ruth Rogers Discusses 3 Decades Of The River Café London

Monday, May 28, 2018

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with London chef Ruth Rogers about three decades of restaurant life and her new cookbook, River Café London.

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Noah Slee Reaches Back To His Tongan 'Otherland'

Monday, May 14, 2018

The Tongan-raised Berlin transplant often finds himself between two worlds that couldn't be more different. In his 2017 debut Otherland, Slee celebrates the community he says once othered him.

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In 'The Perfectionists' Simon Winchester Looks At History Of Precision Engineering

Monday, May 07, 2018

NPR's Mary Louise speaks to author Simon Winchester about how precision in technology has developed since the Industrial Age to today's cutting-edge developments occurring around the world.

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Leon Bridges Remixes His Retro Style To 'Move The Sound Forward'

Friday, May 04, 2018

The singer talks about branching out from '60s soul, writing honest love songs and experimenting with new sounds on his second album, Good Thing.

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Ahead Of Annual NRA Convention, A Member Says It's Sacrificing His Rights

Thursday, May 03, 2018

As the NRA opens its annual meeting Friday, it faces criticism — and not just from gun control advocates. Some gun owners, like Tim Harmsen, are unhappy with the organization's recent compromises.

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North Korean Defector Hopes To See Loved Ones Again — But Remains Skeptical

Tuesday, May 01, 2018

Hyeonseo Lee left North Korea when she was 17. Now 38, she calls the recent meeting between Kim Jong Un and President Moon Jae-in "stunning," and says her greatest hope is reunification.

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Why Former CIA Director John Brennan's Criticism Of Trump Is Extremely Rare

Friday, April 27, 2018

Former CIA Director John Brennan is out of the agency but not the public eye. He's made a point of attacking President Trump ever since his Inauguration. Critics say that can sow discord, but Brennan says he's doing what he thinks is right.

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Free To Speak, Ex-CIA Chief John Brennan Takes On Trump

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Since retiring last year, the former spymaster has been a relentless critic of the president. He says pulling back from existing international agreements is particularly risky.

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In 'The Burning Shores,' Libya Blossoms — Briefly — Before Unraveling

Friday, April 13, 2018

Author Frederic Wehrey's new book follows the country's turmoil after the overthrow and death of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Though signs of normalcy have returned, Wehry says there's still deep trauma.

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Could Syrian President Bashar al-Assad Be Tried As A War Criminal?

Thursday, April 12, 2018

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Alex Whiting, a former prosecutor at the International Criminal Court and Harvard law professor, to get a sense of how war crimes charges against Assad could work.

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Media Or Tech Company? Facebook's Profile Is Blurry

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Regulators, and sometimes the public, still have a tough time getting a handle on just what Facebook is. And that makes it difficult to determine just which laws should govern it.

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Most Americans Feel They've Lost Control Of Their Online Data

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Firms like Facebook use a business model that makes use of people's data. But not all data is created equal. Sharing purchasing habits? Most say that's OK. But private communications? No way.

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Meg Wolitzer's 'Female Persuasion' Honors The Women Who Helped Her On Her Way

Friday, April 06, 2018

Wolitzer's new novel tells the story of two women: an 18-year-old college freshman and the famous feminist who befriends and inspires her.

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Former National Guard Chief On What A 2006 Border Deployment Tells Us Today

Friday, April 06, 2018

The last major deployment of the National Guard to the border was overseen in 2006 by retired Lt. Gen. H. Steven Blum. He says their work freed Border Patrol agents to focus on their primary job.

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