Patrick Jarenwattananon

Patrick Jarenwattananon appears in the following:

Joss Whedon was once hailed as a feminist. Then came the stories about his behavior

Tuesday, January 18, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with reporter Lila Shapiro about the allegations against writer-director Joss Whedon.

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Keira D'Amato sets new American marathon record for women

Monday, January 17, 2022

On Sunday, Keira D'Amato, 37, broke the American marathon record after she finished in just over 2 hours and 19 minutes. She is a mother of two and a real estate agent.

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Why the man who held Texas synagogue hostages invoked the name of Aafia Siddiqui

Monday, January 17, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Mubin Shaikh, counter extremism specialist and public safety professor at Canada's Seneca College, on Aafia Siddiqui's influence in the recent Texas hostage crisis.

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In Ukraine, life goes on despite threat of Russian invasion

Friday, January 14, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Ukrainian journalist and author Nataliya Gumenyuk about the Ukrainian public's perspective on tensions with Russia and the possibility that Russian troops may invade.

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Congo Basin peatlands have trapped years' worth of carbon. How can they be protected?

Friday, January 14, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with journalist John Cannon about the dangers of destroying a hidden peatland in the Congo Basin that has locked in as much carbon dioxide as the world emits in three years.

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Journalists probing Salvadoran government were spied on using military-grade tech

Thursday, January 13, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Julia Gavarrete, a journalist at the digital newspaper El Faro, about a recent study confirming that 22 journalists from El Faro were spied on using the spyware Pegasus.

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Scientists determine age of some of the oldest human bones

Thursday, January 13, 2022

Some of the oldest human remains ever unearthed are the Omo One bones found in Ethiopia. For decades, their precise age has been debated, but a new study argues they're around 233,000 years old.

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Over $5 billion in welfare spends were left unspent by states

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with reporter Hannah Dreyfus from ProPublica about the $5.2 billion of welfare funds that were left unspent by states, despite poverty in the U.S. worsening.

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Erin Jackson almost didn't make Olympic Team USA, but luckily a friend stepped in

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Competitive speed skater Erin Jackson just missed qualifying at the Olympic trials. However, she will still compete for Team USA after fellow skater Brittany Bowe gave her spot to Jackson.

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Why COVID tests can cost anywhere between $20 to $1,400

Tuesday, January 11, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Adam Tanner from Consumer Reports about the range of prices COVID-19 testing companies can charge in the United States.

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An album made entirely of endangered bird sounds beat Taylor Swift on a top 50 chart

Sunday, January 09, 2022

Songs Of Disappearance is an entire album of calls from endangered Australian birds. Last month, it briefly perched at No. 3 on the country's top 50 albums chart – ahead of Taylor Swift.

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Institutions in remote Honduras are permeated by organized drug crime

Friday, January 07, 2022

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with veteran journalist Carlos Dada, founder of El Faro newspaper, about his latest reporting from Honduras.

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Dozens are reported dead in Kazakhstan, where an anti-government revolt is underway

Thursday, January 06, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Melinda Haring, Deputy Director for Atlantic Council's Eurasia Center, on the situation in Kazakhstan and its implications for the rest of the world.

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2 reporters who were in the Capitol on Jan. 6 talk about media coverage of the attack

Wednesday, January 05, 2022

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with reporters Lisa Desjardins and Sarah Ferris about media coverage around the Jan. 6 insurrection and attack on the Capitol.

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Twitters gone viral: album of endangered bird songs charts in Australia

Tuesday, January 04, 2022

Songs of Disappearance is an collection of bird calls from 53 threatened Australian species. And for a brief spell, it was a best-selling album.

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Americans didn't count down the new year until the 1970s

Friday, December 31, 2021

Looking back, countdowns weren't always good news. Think atomic bomb tests. Americans also counted down moon missions and Top 40 hits. It wasn't until 1979 that a Times Square crowd joined in.

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NPR staff remembers the voices they can't stop thinking about

Friday, December 31, 2021

All Things Considered staff reflect on the stories and voices from the program that moved them in 2021.

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Why we count down on New Year's Eve (and why it wasn't always the case)

Friday, December 31, 2021

These days, a New Year's Eve celebration doesn't feel complete without one thing: a countdown. But that ritual to ring in the new year isn't as old as you might think.

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Hong Kong police close pro-democracy outlet Stand News

Wednesday, December 29, 2021

In Hong Kong, authorities from the police's national security department arrested half a dozen senior staff members, confiscated boxes and closed one of the last pro-democracy outlets, Stand News.

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Logic's song '1-800-273-8255' may have led to hundreds of fewer suicides, study finds

Tuesday, December 28, 2021

In 2017, the rapper Logic named a song after the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline phone number. A new study has found it may have had a remarkable impact.

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