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This hi-tech buoy can detect whales and prevent large ships from colliding with them

Friday, September 23, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Professor Douglas McCauley, director of the Benioff Ocean Science Laboratory, about a new technology that protects whales from colliding with large shipping vessels.

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The role of states in contributing to the student debt crisis

Tuesday, September 20, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with economic policy expert Heather McGhee, host of the podcast The Sum Of Us, about how historic disinvestment by states in education contributed to the student debt crisis.

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America's Christian majority is on track to end

Saturday, September 17, 2022

A new study shows that America's Christian majority has been shrinking for years, and if recent trends continue, Christians could make up less than half the U.S. population within a few decades.

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America's Christian majority is shrinking, and could dip below 50% by 2070

Thursday, September 15, 2022

The U.S.'s Christian majority has been shrinking for decades. A Pew Research Center study shows that as of 2020, about 64% of Americans identify as Christian. Fifty years ago, that number was 90%.

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Big crowds and world leaders will attend the queen's funeral. Security is top of mind

Monday, September 12, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Nick Aldworth, former U.K. national coordinator for counterterrorism, about how England is prepping security for Queen Elizabeth's funeral in London next week.

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Democracy around the world seems to be experiencing upheaval

Friday, September 09, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Moisés Naím, a distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about the stability and effectiveness of democracies around the world.

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How the polarizing effect of social media is speeding up

Friday, September 09, 2022

In his new book, journalist Max Fisher unpacks how social media companies have engineered our feeds to keep us angry, and keep us online.

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Social media can inflame your emotions — and it's a byproduct of its design

Tuesday, September 06, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Max Fisher, author of The Chaos Machine, about how social media companies leverage content that elicits anger and outrage to keep users engaged on their platforms.

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The United Kingdom's next prime minister could be a foreign policy hard-liner

Friday, September 02, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Ben Judah, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, about British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss, who will likely succeed Boris Johnson as prime minister.

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25 years ago, Princess Diana's shocking death became one of the first viral moments

Wednesday, August 31, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Tina Brown, author of The Palace Papers, about the lasting impact of Lady Diana's death 25 years later.

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Remembering Joey DeFrancesco, pioneering Hammond organist who changed jazz music

Friday, August 26, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with music critic Nate Chinen about the legacy of iconic jazz Hammond organ player Joey DeFrancesco, who died on Thursday.

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Classrooms in Columbus, Ohio, are empty on 1st day back as teachers strike

Wednesday, August 24, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Regina Fuentes, Columbus Education Association spokesperson, about the teacher's strike over failed contract negotiations between the teacher's union and the school board.

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A Kremlin-linked mercenary group is now openly recruiting for the war in Ukraine

Monday, August 22, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with mercenary expert Sean McFate about recent recruiting strategies by the Wagner Group due to Russian losses in Ukraine.

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This technology makes data accessible to blind and visually impaired people

Friday, August 19, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Mona Minkara, a professor of bioengineering at Northeastern University who is also blind, about a new way to present science data to blind and sighted people alike.

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A year after an earthquake devastated Haiti, one aid official says there is hope

Thursday, August 18, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Ronald Jocelyn, the education director of the Hope for Haiti, about conditions on the ground in Haiti one year after a devastating earthquake hit the country.

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Postpartum care falls short for Black women. One mother is trying to fix that

Tuesday, August 16, 2022

NPR's Juana Summers talks with Jade Kearney, CEO and cofounder of She Matters, a digital platform aimed at addressing disparities in postpartum healthcare for Black mothers.

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How Salman Rushdie's novel sparked controversy in the Muslim world for over 30 years

Monday, August 15, 2022

NPR's Juana Summers speaks with Robin Wright, a Middle East foreign affairs expert, about the impact and legacy of Salman Rushdie's book The Satanic Verses.

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Little is free in prison — Here are the various ways incarcerated people make money

Thursday, August 11, 2022

Beyond basic necessities, everything has a price in prison. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Marshall Project reporter Beth Schwartzapfel about the prison economy and how incarcerated people make money.

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Some podcast guest chairs go to high bidders — without telling listeners

Wednesday, August 10, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Bloomberg's Ashley Carman's about a growing trend of guests paying podcasts to appear on their shows in order to market themselves or their products new target audiences.

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An Arctic shark found in Belize has researchers pondering deep sea discoveries

Tuesday, August 02, 2022

The Greenland shark can live for centuries and is typically found in cold arctic waters. One found in the warmer waters of Belize has researchers rethinking how widespread the marine species could be.

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