Christopher Intagliata

Senior Producer, Science Friday

Christopher Intagliata is Science Friday’s senior producer. He once served as a prop in an optical illusion and speaks passable Ira Flatowese.

Christopher Intagliata is Science Friday’s senior producer, which means he’s chief cheerleader for all the radio and podcast projects here. He helps to select and shape stories, or put them to a gentle death if necessary. He’s also the coordinating producer for Science Friday’s live stage events around the nation, and has skated Olympic ice and served as a prop in an optical illusion for SciFri.

Christopher started at Science Friday as an intern in summer 2008, until the day Ira Flatow called him at home, triggering enormous anxiety about the latest script he’d written, to ask if he wanted to be a producer. His favorite stories usually involve microbes or food or both, but anything can pique his interest—other than ocean chemistry. Sorry.

He also reports regularly for Scientific American‘s “60-Second Science” podcast, and was a 2015 Woods Hole Ocean Science Journalism fellow. Prior to becoming a science journalist, he taught English to soldiers and bankers in Verona, Italy, and traversed the Sierra Nevada mountains as a field biologist, on the lookout for mountain yellow-legged frogs. He speaks fluent Italian, awkward Japanese, and passable Ira Flatowese.

Christopher Intagliata appears in the following:

Ginger Root's Cameron Lew wants his new EP to showcase city pop as familiar yet fresh

Thursday, September 29, 2022

NPR's Juana Summers talks with Cameron Lew of the band Ginger Root about his new EP Nisemono and the vintage Japanese pop that inspires his sound.

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STD rates are surging. Here's why

Friday, September 23, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with David Harvey, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors, about how STD rates are soaring in the U.S. — especially syphilis, which is up 26%.

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How mass migrant crossings are impacting the small border town of Rio Grande City

Wednesday, September 21, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Rio Grande City Mayor Joel Villarreal about the influx of migrants crossing through his south Texas city.

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On debut solo album, Marcus Mumford explores healing, mercy and forgiveness

Friday, September 16, 2022

NPR's Juana Summers chats with Marcus Mumford about his debut solo album, Self-Titled, which is a deeply personal exploration of healing, mercy and forgiveness.

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5 things the U.N. boss is very worried about and signal 'a time of great peril'

Friday, September 16, 2022

From fighting near the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, to fertilizer shortages and Europe's energy crisis, these are five things on Secretary-General Antonio Guterres' mind right now.

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This GOP strategist is calling on Republican senators to safeguard same-sex marriage

Wednesday, September 14, 2022

NPR's Sarah McCammon speaks with GOP strategist John Feehery about his efforts to recruit Republican support for the Respect for Marriage Act, which would protect the right to same-sex marriage.

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Professionals beware: That new LinkedIn connection request may be part of a scam

Wednesday, September 14, 2022

A new online scam involving LinkedIn is duping professionals into investing in cryptocurrencies, and then scammers steal their money.

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Ukrainian delegation rallies Washington for support

Tuesday, September 13, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Ukrainian activist Hanna Hopko about her efforts leading a civil society delegation in Washington trying to lobby lawmakers to send more aid and weapons to Ukraine.

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Big crowds and world leaders will attend the queen's funeral. Security is top of mind

Monday, September 12, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Nick Aldworth, former U.K. national coordinator for counterterrorism, about how England is prepping security for Queen Elizabeth's funeral in London next week.

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A kidnapped goddess returns home, after prosecutors expose art thieves

Friday, September 09, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Erin Thompson of CUNY about the recent seizure of ancient artifacts from the Met Museum, and the forthcoming repatriation of these objects to their home countries.

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How the polarizing effect of social media is speeding up

Friday, September 09, 2022

In his new book, journalist Max Fisher unpacks how social media companies have engineered our feeds to keep us angry, and keep us online.

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California public health official on staying safe during scorching heatwave

Thursday, September 08, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Dr. Tomás Aragón, director of the California Department of Public Health, about how the state is responding to its recent heatwave.

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Canadian police apprehend suspect in deadly mass stabbing

Wednesday, September 07, 2022

Police in Canada say they have apprehended the fugitive suspected of killing 10 people on Sunday. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Canadian Press reporter Bill Graveland about the manhunt.

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East Kentucky's cultural cornerstone is trying to salvage its archives after floods

Wednesday, September 07, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Alex Gibson of the Kentucky-based arts and media organization Appalshop, about how recent floods affected their archives of Appalachian music, film and heritage items.

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Social media can inflame your emotions — and it's a byproduct of its design

Tuesday, September 06, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to Max Fisher, author of The Chaos Machine, about how social media companies leverage content that elicits anger and outrage to keep users engaged on their platforms.

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What's next for Chile after voters rejected a new constitution

Tuesday, September 06, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Antonia Laborde, a reporter for El País in Santiago de Chile after voters in the country rejected a new constitution. Now the country must consider a new path forward.

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Former Australian Prime Minister blames Fox News for America's polarized politics

Wednesday, August 31, 2022

Why are American politics so polarized now? NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull about why he blames Rupert Murdoch, the former CEO of Fox News.

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Former U.S. diplomat to Russia Thomas Graham on the life of Mikhail Gorbachev

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with former U.S. diplomat to Russia Thomas Graham about the life of Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Soviet leader.

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It seems like everyone loves garlic. 'Eater' looks at why do recipes use so little

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Eater reporter Bettina Makalintal about her recent piece, "Why Do So Many Recipes Call for So Little Garlic?"

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Remembering the man behind the Trapper Keeper

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

E. Bryant Crutchfield, the inventor of the Trapper Keeper, died this month at age 85.

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