Christopher Intagliata

Senior Producer, Science Friday

Christopher Intagliata is Science Friday’s senior producer. He once served as a prop in an optical illusion and speaks passable Ira Flatowese.

Christopher Intagliata is Science Friday’s senior producer, which means he’s chief cheerleader for all the radio and podcast projects here. He helps to select and shape stories, or put them to a gentle death if necessary. He’s also the coordinating producer for Science Friday’s live stage events around the nation, and has skated Olympic ice and served as a prop in an optical illusion for SciFri.

Christopher started at Science Friday as an intern in summer 2008, until the day Ira Flatow called him at home, triggering enormous anxiety about the latest script he’d written, to ask if he wanted to be a producer. His favorite stories usually involve microbes or food or both, but anything can pique his interest—other than ocean chemistry. Sorry.

He also reports regularly for Scientific American‘s “60-Second Science” podcast, and was a 2015 Woods Hole Ocean Science Journalism fellow. Prior to becoming a science journalist, he taught English to soldiers and bankers in Verona, Italy, and traversed the Sierra Nevada mountains as a field biologist, on the lookout for mountain yellow-legged frogs. He speaks fluent Italian, awkward Japanese, and passable Ira Flatowese.

Christopher Intagliata appears in the following:

Before 'Hrs and Hrs,' Muni Long spent years and years working for others

Friday, February 03, 2023

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with artist Muni Long about being a first-time Grammy nominee in three categories.

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In bluegrass, as in life, Molly Tuttle would rather be a 'Crooked Tree'

Friday, February 03, 2023

Molly Tuttle's new album is her third. But in many ways, it's a reintroduction – of her prodigious guitar talent, of her personal story, and to the Recording Academy that decides Grammy Awards.

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Bollywood film 'Pathaan' sparks dance parties in theatres

Thursday, February 02, 2023

The new Bollywood spy thriller Pathaan is transforming movie theaters into dance clubs with its catchy theme — and it's breaking records at the box office in India and abroad.

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COVID's impact on classrooms will linger and must be addressed, according to teachers

Thursday, February 02, 2023

Teachers across the country are facing new obstacles in post-pandemic life as they try and shape young minds at the same time. We catch up with a group of educators to find out what's on their mind.

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In bluegrass, as in life, Molly Tuttle would rather be a 'Crooked Tree'

Thursday, February 02, 2023

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with bluegrass musician and first-time Grammy nominee Molly Tuttle about what this nomination means to her.

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Omar Apollo taught himself how to sing from YouTube. Now he's up for a Grammy

Thursday, February 02, 2023

Omar Apollo has been nominated for Best New Artist at the Grammys, an accolade that usually takes artists years to achieve. But not for Apollo.

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Neanderthal groups looked and acted differently than once thought, research suggests

Wednesday, February 01, 2023

Researchers re-analyzed elephant bones found in a German cave and say Neanderthals likely cut and butchered them, suggesting Neanderthal groups may have been larger and more sedentary than thought.

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Humans and dolphins work together to fish in southern Brazilian city, ecologist says

Wednesday, February 01, 2023

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Mauricio Cantor, behavioral ecologist at Oregon State University, about his study on how humans and dolphins work together to fish in a southern Brazilian city.

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Despite his quick rise to fame, Omar Apollo 'started from zero'

Wednesday, February 01, 2023

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with artist Omar Apollo about his first time being nominated for a Grammy. He's nominated in the Best New Artist category.

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Pro football brothers are set to face off in Super Bowl sibling Sunday

Monday, January 30, 2023

For the next two weeks the Super Bowl will unofficially be The Kelce Bowl. This will be the first time the brothers will play on opposite teams.

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Modi's government blocks a documentary critical of the prime minister

Thursday, January 26, 2023

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute Sadanand Dhume about India's Modi government censoring a new BBC documentary that critiques the prime minister.

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Biologist Phil Pister — who singlehandedly saved species from extinction — dead at 94

Thursday, January 26, 2023

Phil Pister, a biologist who singlehandedly saved a rare fish from extinction by walking through the desert at night with two buckets in his hands, has died at 94.

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Senators slam Ticketmaster over bungling of Taylor Swift tickets, question breakup

Tuesday, January 24, 2023

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Variety's Jem Aswad about the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing into Live Nation and the lack of competition in the ticketing industry.

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How to stop worrying and love (or at least live with) ChatGPT

Tuesday, January 24, 2023

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Wharton professor Ethan Mollick about his decision to embrace artificial intelligence tools like ChatGPT in the classroom.

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Scientists find 17-pound meteorite in Antarctica

Monday, January 23, 2023

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Maria Valdes of Chicago's Field Museum about a fresh haul of meteorites she and other scientists collected in Antarctica.

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The star of Eurovision-winning band Måneskin continues to rise with new album

Friday, January 20, 2023

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Damiano David and Victoria De Angelis of the Grammy-nominated Italian rock group Måneskin about their new album Rush!

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FEMA head talks about storm recovery efforts

Friday, January 20, 2023

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with FEMA administrator Deanne Criswell about federal storm recovery efforts.

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How climate change is killing the world's languages

Thursday, January 19, 2023

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to Karen McVeigh of The Guardian about her reporting on the connection between climate change and global language loss.

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Study shows heavy stones may give big leaps in water — plus real-world implications

Thursday, January 19, 2023

Researchers have studied the physics behind heavy stones skipping across the surface of water. They say these findings could be applied to real-world problems like de-icing airplanes.

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Is music an exclusively human thing? A new study says no

Tuesday, January 17, 2023

Charles Darwin once speculated that all animals may share the ability to perceive melody and rhythm. Although the evidence is slim, there are a few studies that support Darwin's idea.

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