Justine Kenin

Justine Kenin appears in the following:

Patients in 'trigger law' states reorient after access to abortion care halts

Friday, June 24, 2022

Robin Marty, operations director of the West Alabama Women's Center, talks about the patients who just missed their chance to receive abortions in Alabama, where the ban went into effect immediately.

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Here's what makes poetry and gardens a perfect pair, according to 2 poet-gardeners

Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Writers and gardeners Ross Gay and Tess Taylor and about what gardens and poetry can bring — including the reminder to breathe and nourish the body and soul.

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Why Democrats are paying for ads supporting Republican primary candidates

Monday, June 20, 2022

Democrats are buying ads supporting far-right GOP primary candidates, in the hopes of facing them in the general election — a strategy that former Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri tried in 2012.

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Helium prices are blowing up. Here's what is causing the increase

Friday, June 17, 2022

When it comes to the global helium supply this year, "everything that could go wrong has gone wrong," says one analyst. That affects everything from birthday balloons to superconducting magnets.

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Filipino archivist races to protect history of abuses ahead of Marcos presidency

Friday, June 17, 2022

NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks to Carmelo Crisanto, executive director of the Human Rights Violations Victims' Memorial Commission, about racing to archive human rights abuses in the Philippines.

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Missing men were killed trying to warn of illegal activity threatening the Amazon

Thursday, June 16, 2022

It appears journalist Dom Phillips and researcher Bruno Pereira were killed reporting in the Amazon. Guardian environmental editor John Watts reflects on their work and why the region is so perilous.

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Climate change could be to blame for the Sriracha shortage

Wednesday, June 15, 2022

There's a nationwide shortage of the beloved hot sauce, Sriracha from Huy Fong Foods. And climate change could be the culprit.

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After 27 years, Microsoft has retired Internet Explorer

Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Internet Explorer officially retires Thursday. NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Margaret O'Mara, professor at the University of Washington, about the embattled web browser's long history.

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Gabby Giffords reflects on this moment in time for gun safety measures

Tuesday, June 14, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with former Rep. Gabby Giffords, who was shot more than a decade ago, about whether efforts for gun control may go differently this time due to recent mass shootings.

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Sen. Raphael Warnock on his new memoir 'A Way Out of No Way' and what gives him hope

Tuesday, June 14, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Sen. Raphael Warnock about his memoir A Way Out of No Way and how he proved himself wrong by winning a Georgia Senate seat as a Black Democrat.

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The Suffers lead singer Kam Franklin talks about the tough road to their latest album

Thursday, June 09, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Kam Franklin, lead singer of the Gulf Coast soul band The Suffers, about her hometown being a source of strength, because the industry hasn't always embraced her.

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Overachiever Tracy Flick faces her unmet life expectations in 'Tracy Flick Can't Win'

Thursday, June 09, 2022

Tracy Flick is back — this time in middle age. How did life turn out for her? NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Tom Perrotta about his new novel, Tracy Flick Can't Win.

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Homophobia has lingered in baseball since the days of Glenn Burke in the 1970s

Tuesday, June 07, 2022

NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with author Andrew Maraniss about homophobia in Major League Baseball's history after some members of the Tampa Bay Rays refused to wear Pride jerseys.

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How TikTok helped save this small Australian candy shop

Tuesday, June 07, 2022

When the pandemic hit, this small business was about to shutter its doors. Then Tiktok came along.

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How to get ready for what reproductive care could look like if Roe is overturned

Friday, June 03, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Dr. Raegan McDonald-Mosely, CEO of Power to Decide, and Robin Marty, author of Handbook for a Post-Roe America, about how Americans can prepare if Roe is overturned.

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This Australian candy shop has mesmerized the internet

Friday, June 03, 2022

After nearing a lockdown-induced bankruptcy, millions of people around the world now follow this Australian candy shop on social media.

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Poet Amanda Gorman reflects on a tough week for America

Tuesday, May 31, 2022

One week after the Uvalde killings, we hear poet Amanda Gorman. She shares the power of poetry and a new poem.

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How 'Gone Girl' hold up 10 years later, according to a book critic

Monday, May 30, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with book critic Maris Kreizman about Gone Girl and the long shadow it still casts over the psychological thriller market, 10 years after it was published.

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What 'Queer Ducks' can teach teenagers about sexuality in the animal kingdom

Sunday, May 29, 2022

The new book, Queer Ducks (and Other Animals), is designed to be teenager friendly. It's filled with comics and humor and accessible science on the diversity of sexual behavior in the animal world.

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The trauma of gun violence affects all children, not just the ones who were there

Friday, May 27, 2022

NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox, author of the book Children Under Fire, about the immediate and long-term affects of gun violence on children.

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