Justine Kenin

Justine Kenin appears in the following:

Expert helps untangle vaccine misinformation that has followed Colin Powell's death

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

NPR's Sarah McCammon talks with Dr. Hyung Chun, professor of cardiology at Yale and senior author of a study in COVID breakthrough cases, on vaccine misinformation following the death of Colin Powell.

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Oliver Jeffers' new picture book is a different kind of ghost story

Monday, October 18, 2021

What's it like to live with ghosts? What if you sense them, but you're not quite sure they're there? These questions are at the heart of a new picture book illustrated and written by Oliver Jeffers.

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Benton Harbor mayor talks about his city's lead water crisis

Monday, October 18, 2021

Officials have known for years that Benton Harbor, Mich., has high levels of lead in the water. Now, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has set an 18-month goal for replacing the lead pipes throughout the city.

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Anthology 'The Matter of Black Lives' reflects on America's past to guide its future

Friday, October 15, 2021

NPR's Sarah McCammon talks with writer Jelani Cobb about a new collection of work from The New Yorker, "The Matter of Black Lives." Cobb co-edited it and wrote the introduction.

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Novelist Margaret Verble on history, family and identity

Thursday, October 14, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Margaret Verble, author of When Two Feathers Fell from the Sky, a story about a young Cherokee horse-diver who is finding her way in the Jim Crow South.

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President of truck driving school says driver shortage is causing supply chain issues

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Bruce Busada, president of the Diesel Driving Academy, about how truck driver shortages are worsening supply chain struggles.

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New book brings foodies on a global culinary adventure

Tuesday, October 12, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Cecily Wong, one of the co-authors of a new book called Gastro Obscura: A Food Adventurer's Guide. It explores culinary delicacies from every continent.

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Plenty more Jon Grudens to go around in the NFL

Tuesday, October 12, 2021

After years of emails containing his racist, misogynist and homophobic comments were released, Las Vegas Raiders head coach Jon Gruden resigned Monday night.

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'Squid Game' conquered the world, but speaks to Korea

Tuesday, October 05, 2021

Squid Game has stunned viewers worldwide with its freaky take on the survival genre. Its specificity and historical references might be lost on its massive audience, though.

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National Women's Soccer League cancels weekend games after investigation into coach

Friday, October 01, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Meg Linehan of The Athletic about her investigation into former National Women's Soccer League coach Paul Riley, who has been accused to sexual coercion.

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This just in — go to bed angry

Friday, October 01, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with reporter Rhaina Cohen about her new piece in The Atlantic, called "The Secret to a Fight-Free Relationship."

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In 'The Sopranos' prequel set in the '60s, James Gandolfini's son plays a young Tony

Friday, October 01, 2021

It seemed unlikely there would ever be a follow-up to 'The Sopranos' after lead actor James Gandolfini died. Now, prequel movie features a young Tony Soprano played by Michael Gandolfini, James' son.

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Comedian Josh Johnson Dares To Make Us Laugh In A Global Pandemic

Thursday, September 30, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with comedian Josh Johnson about his newfound success and how comedy has served as a processing tool for collective trauma throughout the pandemic.

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Why Texas' Draft Map Of Congressional Districts Is Rankling Many Black, Latino Voters

Thursday, September 30, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Michael Li, senior counsel at the Brennan Center, and James Barragán, reporter at The Texas Tribune, about the redistricting process in Texas and around the country.

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Survivors Of The Trinity Nuclear Test Weren't Warned — Then Were Lied To After

Monday, September 27, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Lesley Blume about the struggle of the survivors of the Trinity nuclear test in 1945 — one locals didn't know was coming and caused serious health issues.

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Zebras On The Lam Are Dazzling Suburban Maryland

Friday, September 24, 2021

A dazzle of zebras — that's what you call a group of them by the way — escaped from a legally-run farm in the D.C. area 25 days ago. Since then, they've been popping up in the suburbs.

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DHS Secretary Mayorkas On Border Conditions And Next Steps For Surge Of Migrants

Thursday, September 23, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas about the government's handling of refugees at the U.S.-Mexico border.

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'How the Monuments Came Down' Filmmakers On Why Lee Statue Didn't Come Down Sooner

Friday, September 17, 2021

Filmmakers Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren discuss their film, How the Monuments Came Down, about 160 years of history in Richmond, VA., and the removal of the confederate statues along Monument Ave.

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El Salvador Protest Reflected Concerns Over Democracy And Bitcoin

Friday, September 17, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel talks with El Faro journalist Valeria Guzman in El Salvador about this week's protest against President Nayib Bukele.

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Gymnasts Testify That The FBI Failed To Protect Them Against Nassar

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Gymnasts testifying on Capitol Hill on Wednesday repeatedly said that the FBI failed to protect them from Larry Nassar.

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