Sarah Handel

Sarah Handel appears in the following:

Restaurant workers are feeling a sense of déjà vu as omicron threatens the industry

Wednesday, January 19, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with a restaurant owner and worker on how the omicron variant and latest surge of COVID cases are once again disrupting their industry.

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Sudan's pro-democracy movement hopes to force a transition to civilian rule

Monday, January 17, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly chats with Kholood Khair, managing partner of a think tank in Khartoum, about ongoing pro-democracy protests in Sudan.

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Remembering devoted father Arthur Schwartz, who died of COVID

Friday, January 14, 2022

Arthur Schwartz of Ann Arbor, Mich., was a longtime employee of General Motors, a baseball fanatic and a loving father. He died in 2020 from COVID-19.

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Disability rights advocates meet with CDC director Walensky

Friday, January 14, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Matthew Cortland, senior fellow at Data For Progress, who was present at Friday's meeting between disability rights advocates and CDC director Rochelle Walensky.

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Secretary of State Blinken says Russia will face consequences if it invade Ukraine

Thursday, January 13, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken about the United States' role in the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine.

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Former Harry Reid staffer on Biden's support of getting rid of the filibuster

Tuesday, January 11, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Adam Jentleson, who served as the deputy chief of staff to Sen. Harry Reid, about the impact President Biden's support of changing Senate rules has on the filibuster.

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'A Hero' tells the story of how complicated a good deed (and a small lie) can be

Friday, January 07, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Iranian director Asghar Farhadi about his new film, A Hero. The story examines the complexity of what appears to many to be a good deed.

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How Western Australia has managed to avoid large Covid-19 outbreaks

Thursday, January 06, 2022

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with reporter Jacob Kagi of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation about how Western Australia has managed their COVID-19 numbers throughout the pandemic.

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Things seem grim now. But America's COVID situation could get better in 6-8 weeks

Wednesday, January 05, 2022

In the face of rising COVID-19 cases, Dr. Bob Wachter of the University of California, San Francisco, offers reasons to be hopeful about the pandemic's outlook in the months ahead.

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The case for COVID optimism, despite sky-high infection rates

Tuesday, January 04, 2022

In the face of rising COVID cases, Dr. Bob Wachter of the University of California San Francisco offers reasons to be hopeful about the pandemic's outlook in the months ahead.

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2 years after the U.S. killed Iran's Qasem Soleimani, tensions remain

Monday, January 03, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Karim Sadjadpour, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, about the impact of the U.S.'s assassination of Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani.

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Words that define 2021 include vaccine, infrastructure and insurrection

Friday, December 31, 2021

If you had to define 2021 with just one word what would it be? Merriam-Webster Editor-at-Large Peter Sokolowski talks about what words were most on people's minds throughout the year.

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Americans didn't count down the new year until the 1970s

Friday, December 31, 2021

Looking back, countdowns weren't always good news. Think atomic bomb tests. Americans also counted down moon missions and Top 40 hits. It wasn't until 1979 that a Times Square crowd joined in.

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How Dan Bongino is building a right-wing media empire on his own terms

Thursday, December 30, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Evan Osnos of The New Yorker about radio host Dan Bongino, who calls masks "face diapers," opposes vaccine mandates and says the 2016 and 2020 elections were rigged.

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Decision-making in the time of omicron

Tuesday, December 28, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with emergency physician Dr. Leana Wen and San Francisco State University's Gaurav Suri about which activities are safe on a given day with the spread of omicron.

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Americans saved a lot of money this year dispite record inflation

Tuesday, December 28, 2021

Americans stashed away $2.7 trillion in excess savings over the pandemic even as inflation rates hit a record high.

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Maggie Gyllenhaal explores the difficulty of motherhood in her directorial debut

Tuesday, December 28, 2021

The new movie The Lost Daughter shows a side of motherhood that Hollywood doesn't often depict.

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John Wilson wants to capture a New York that's both 'timeless and aggressively dated'

Monday, December 27, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with John Wilson who unveils the absurdity of the mundane in his HBO show, How To With John Wilson.

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Maggie Gyllenhaal explores the honesty of being a mother in her directorial debut

Friday, December 24, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with actress Maggie Gyllenhaal about her directorial debut The Lost Daughter, which takes a unique look at motherhood. Now in theaters, the film will be on Netflix on Dec. 31.

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'Service above self': Remembering Dr. Horatio Cabasares, who died from COVID-19

Thursday, December 23, 2021

Dr. Horatio Cabasares died from COVID-19 just over a year ago. His son, Hubert, remembers his father, who immigrated from the Philippines and made his mark as the only surgeon in a small Georgia town.

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