Sarah Handel

Sarah Handel appears in the following:

Republican Congressman Mike Lawler discusses foreign aid package

Friday, April 19, 2024

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Congressman Mike Lawler, R-N.Y., about the foreign aid package that the House is finally considering after massive efforts from Speaker Mike Johnson.

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Hall of Fame college coach Dawn Staley Reflects on the state of women's basketball.

Wednesday, April 17, 2024

All Things Considered co-host Mary Louise Kelly talks with South Carolina Gamecocks' coach Dawn Staley about the state of women's basketball and her growing legacy as the new "standard" for coaching.

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A woman has received a death sentence in the largest fraud trial in Vietnam's history

Friday, April 12, 2024

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Associated Press reporter Aniruddha Ghosal about the largest-ever fraud case in Vietnam. The real estate tycoon at the center of it has received a death sentence.

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Prosecutor in Crumbley case cautions charges are the exception, not the norm

Tuesday, April 09, 2024

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Karen Walker, who prosecuted the cases against the parents of a mass school shooter. James and Jennifer Crumbley were sentenced to 10 to 15 years in prison.

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From across the path of totality: Reactions to the solar eclipse

Monday, April 08, 2024

NPR member station reporters have been stationed along the path of totality — in Arkansas, Ohio, Texas, Maine, and elsewhere — and they're bringing us reactions from observers at these watch-parties.

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Rudy Mancuso's 'Musica' brings viewers inside the sensation of rhythmic synesthesia

Thursday, April 04, 2024

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Rudy Mancuso about his new movie, Musica. It's his semi-autobiographical film about living with synesthesia and falling in love.

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For this Texas State Rep., the immigration law SB4 hits personally

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Texas State Rep. Armando Walle about the potential impact of SB4 on Hispanic communities in the state.

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New study shows that pollution in Louisiana's 'Cancer Alley' may affect births

Monday, March 18, 2024

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Jessica Kutz, a reporter for The 19th, about a recent study that sheds light on how polluted air in Louisiana has affected pregnant people and their children.

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Actor Michael Imperioli talks 'An enemy of the People' and its modern parallels

Monday, March 18, 2024

NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with actor Michael Imperioli about his Broadway debut in An Enemy of the People and the relevance of this adaptation of the play, roughly 150 years after the original.

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Remembering David Mixner, a 'titan' in the fight for gay rights

Wednesday, March 13, 2024

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly remembers the life of civil rights leader David Mixner with his friend and mentee, Brian Sims.

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New Alabama law protects IVF, but still identifies embryo as a child

Thursday, March 07, 2024

NPR's Ari Shapiro checks in with fertility specialist Dr. Beth Malizia following the new Alabama law that protects IVF.

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The internet is obsessed with a woman's TikTok story about marrying a compulsive liar

Wednesday, February 28, 2024

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Rachelle Hampton and Candice Lim, hosts of the Slate podcast ICYMI, about "Who the F Did I Marry," the TikTok saga that now has tens of millions of views.

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The Indigo Girls on how their song ended up in 'Barbie,' which is up for 8 Oscars

Wednesday, February 28, 2024

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with the Indigo Girls, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers, about their 1989 hit "Closer to Fine" being featured prominently in the Barbie movie, which is up for eight Oscars.

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Greta Lee of 'Past Lives' talks about how language and identity are intertwined

Friday, February 23, 2024

Greta Lee stars in the new movie Past Lives. She talks with NPR's Ailsa Chang about the film and the ways language and identity are intertwined.

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Uncertainty looms after Alabama's IVF court ruling

Thursday, February 22, 2024

Alabama's new court ruling that frozen embryos should receive legal protections as "unborn life," leaves fertility clinics and parents-to-be in limbo.

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New York rolls out a social-justice oriented weed legalization program

Thursday, February 22, 2024

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with New Yorker writer Jia Tolentino about her latest piece, which chronicles the rollout of New York's social justice-oriented weed legalization program.

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Beyoncé's 'Texas Hold 'Em' adds to a long legacy of Black women in country music

Wednesday, February 21, 2024

With Beyoncé on top Billboard's Hot Country Songs chart, NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Francesca Royster, author of Black Country Music, about the history of Black women in country music.

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How safe are other Kremlin critics held in Russia's prison system?

Monday, February 19, 2024

Alexei Navalny's death has shaken the families of other political prisoners in Russia. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Evgenia Kara-Murza, the wife of jailed opposition figure Vladimir Kara-Murza.

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Director of film 'Navalny' remembers his friend

Friday, February 16, 2024

Daniel Roher, director of the Oscar-winning documentary Navalny, talks with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about his time with Alexei Navalny, who was determined to return to Russia despite the risk.

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The mayor of Kansas City recounts the shooting at a Super Bowl celebration

Thursday, February 15, 2024

NPR's Juana Summers talks to Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas about the shooting at a Super Bowl celebration Wednesday that killed one person and injured more than 20 others.

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