Patrick Jarenwattananon

Patrick Jarenwattananon appears in the following:

What Does A Path Forward Look Like For Israel And Palestinians?

Friday, May 14, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Mkhaimar Abusada, political science professor at Al-Azhar University in Gaza, and Israeli political analyst Akiva Eldar, about paths to a ceasefire in Israel.

Comment

A 'Shot' At $1 Million? Local Governments Offering Incentives For Vaccines

Thursday, May 13, 2021

Free hunting license in Maine, free beer in New Jersey and a chance to win $1 million in Ohio. Across the country, cities and state are offering incentives to get people vaccinated against COVID-19.

Comment

Rep. Curtis, R-Utah, Explains His Vote To Remove Liz Cheney From House Leadership

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Republican Congressman John Curtis of Utah about his vote to remove Liz Cheney from her leadership position in the House of Representatives.

Comment

How Much Will Hesitancy Among Parents Affect Vaccine Rollout To Children?

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Children as young as 12 can now get Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine, but it may be hard to convince some parents to let them. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly and pediatrician Dr. Sally Goza discuss this hesitancy.

Comment

Dawn Richard Sings Her Freedom On 'Second Line'

Monday, May 10, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with New Orleans multi-hyphenate Dawn Richard about her long journey from budding pop star to indie auteur, as well as her latest album Second Line.

Comment

'TCM Reframed' Looks At Beloved Old Movies Through Modern Eyes

Thursday, May 06, 2021

Turner Classic Movies' Reframed series aims to provide context and conversation around canonical films that have been revealed as problematic by contemporary standards.

Comment

As Campus Life Resumes, So Does Concern Over Hazing

Tuesday, May 04, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Hank Nuwer about concerns that a pandemic-induced lull in hazing-related deaths may reverse as college students return to campus.

Comment

For This Family, India's COVID-19 Surge Was Personal

Monday, May 03, 2021

One family describes racing against time to try and find an intensive care unit bed during India's COVID-19 surge.

Comment

'Radio Diaries' Creator Looks Back On 25 Years Of The Project

Friday, April 30, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Radio Diaries creator Joe Richman about some of the people he's introduced us to over the past 25 years and how documenting one's life has changed over time.

Comment

Underdogs And Longshots, Get Ready: This May Be The NFL Draft For You

Thursday, April 29, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Kalyn Kahler, who writes for the sports blog Defector, about this year's unusually thin NFL Draft class.

Comment

FDA Moves To Ban Menthol Cigarettes

Thursday, April 29, 2021

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is planning to ban menthol cigarettes, a move the National Medical Association has urged for years. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with the NMA's Dr. Doris Browne.

Comment

White House Economist Says Investments In Families Is Long Overdue

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Heather Boushey, an economist on the White House Council of Economic Advisers, about President Biden's American Families Plan.

Comment

The State Of Police Training In The U.S.

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Chuck Wexler, the executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum about the state of police training for the U.S.'s 800,000 officers.

Comment

Russia And U.S. At Odds Over Alexei Navalny, Ukraine

Monday, April 26, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with foreign policy expert Angela Stent about Russia's military movements near Ukraine and Alexei Navalny's condition.

Comment

Abnormally Dry California Forests Are A Grim Warning For 2021's Wildfire Season

Friday, April 23, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with reporter Amy Graff from SFGate about a grim sign for 2021's wildfire season: low moisture in California forests.

Comment

Doctors Weigh In On How To Navigate A Partially Vaccinated Society

Friday, April 23, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to doctors Monica Gandhi and Leana Wen about how Americans can navigate a half-vaccinated society.

Comment

Black Americans React To Chauvin Verdict, Feel 'Hopeful,' 'Skeptical,' 'Relieved'

Friday, April 23, 2021

Black Americans around the country have been processing their emotions surrounding the case of Derek Chauvin. Some are joyful. Some are relieved. Others are skeptical about what happens now.

Comment

Archaeologists Discover Earliest Example Of Dog Domestication In Arabia

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Archaeologists have discovered remains of the earliest example of dog domestication on the Arabian Peninsula, providing a look into pet ownership 6,000 years ago.

Comment

Philonise Floyd And Attorney Ben Crump Reflect On Chauvin Verdict

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Philonise Floyd and his attorney Ben Crump about the guilty verdicts finding former officer Derek Chauvin responsible for the death of George Floyd.

Comment

George Floyd's Friend Speaks About Chauvin's Verdict

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Ronnie Lillard, friend of George Floyd, about his reaction to Tuesday's verdict.

Comment