Patrick Jarenwattananon

Patrick Jarenwattananon appears in the following:

Juneteenth Commissioner In Texas Reacts To The Holiday Going National

Friday, June 18, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Byron E. Miller, Juneteenth Commissioner for the Fiesta Celebration in San Antonio, about the holiday's cultural significance and what the new federal recognition means.

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Indigenous Activist On Why Groups Are Protesting The Line 3 Pipeline In Minnesota

Thursday, June 17, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish chats with attorney and indigenous rights activist Tara Houska about protests against Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline in northern Minnesota.

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New Report Details Firsthand Accounts Of Torture From Uyghur Muslims In China

Thursday, June 10, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Jonathan Loeb, a senior crisis adviser and the lead author of Amnesty International's new report on the persecution of Uyghurs and other minority groups in Xinjiang.

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A Subway Microbe Map Shows Life In Cities Around The World

Thursday, June 10, 2021

A team of more than 900 international researchers and volunteers has assembled an atlas of microorganisms present in the subways of 60 cities around the world.

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You Asked, We Got Answers: The U.S. Surgeon General Takes On Your COVID-19 Questions

Wednesday, June 09, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, sharing listeners' pandemic questions like how to keep kids who can't be vaccinated safe, and what a booster shot may look like.

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Neck And Neck In The Polls, Peru's Presidential Candidates Are Far Apart Politically

Monday, June 07, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Andrés Calderón, an independent lawyer and journalist, to check in about the Peruvian presidential election.

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U.S. Boarding Schools Were The Blueprint For Indigenous Family Separation In Canada

Thursday, June 03, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Mary Annette Pember, correspondent for Indian Country Today, about the roots of indigenous boarding schools in the U.S., which were models for the Canadian system.

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Remembering Red Summer: Years Of Racial Violence 'Set The Stage' For Tulsa Massacre

Wednesday, June 02, 2021

100 years later, the 1921 race massacre that destroyed a thriving Black neighborhood in Tulsa, Okla., is in the national spotlight. But at the time, this racist violence wasn't limited to Tulsa.

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Biden Hasn't Changed ICE's Budget, But He Has Changed The Agency's Approach

Friday, May 28, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Randy Capps from the U.S. research at the Migration Policy Institute about the Biden administration's approach to funding Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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Intelligence Priorities Shift As Biden Calls For Investigation Into COVID-19 Origins

Thursday, May 27, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with The Wall Street Journal's Michael Gordon on President Biden's order to investigate the origins of COVID-19 and how U.S. intelligence doesn't prioritize pandemic detection.

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The Science Behind Vaccine Incentives

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Katy Milkman, professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, about which vaccine incentives work best and why.

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Author Discusses Standing In Solidarity With Nikole Hannah-Jones

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Martha Jones, author and professor of history at John Hopkins University, about her role in writing a letter of solidarity in The Root for Nikole Hannah-Jones.

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This Contender For The World's Longest Cheesesteak Spans 3 City Blocks

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

A group of chefs in South Philly's Italian Market set out to break the record for world's longest cheesesteak on Monday. The resulting hoagie spanned three blocks and caused some traffic issues.

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Irish Minister For European Affairs On Belarus' Forced Diversion To Arrest Journalist

Monday, May 24, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Thomas Byrne, Ireland's Minister for European Affairs, about Belarus' forced diversion of an international passenger flight to remove an opposition journalist.

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Family Attorney Speaks 1 Year After George Floyd's Killing

Monday, May 24, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with the attorney for George Floyd's family, Benjamin Crump, one year after Floyd was killed by police.

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A Reporter Weighs In On UNC's Decision To Deny Nikole Hannah-Jones Tenure

Thursday, May 20, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Joe Killian, investigative reporter for NC Policy Watch, about the University of North Carolina's decision to not give Nikole Hannah-Jones tenure status.

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Ecuador Decriminalized Abortion In Rape Cases — What That Means For South America

Thursday, May 20, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with sociologist and lawyer Ana Cristina Vera about what Ecuador's recent expansion of abortion decriminalization means for reproductive rights in South America.

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Play It Forward: George Clinton Is Everyone's Hype Man

Wednesday, May 19, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with George Clinton about the legacy of his work, how the spirit of funk is synonymous with freedom and an artist he's grateful for: Constance Hauman.

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America's Satanic Panic Returns — This Time Through QAnon

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

In the 1980s, false accusations of satanic ritual abuse spread across the U.S. Now, QAnon has revived those fears, borrowing from the playbook of the Satanic Panic from decades prior.

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St. Vincent On The Sleazy '70s Sounds And The Background Stories Of 'Daddy's Home'

Friday, May 14, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with musician Annie Clark about her new '70s-inspired album as St. Vincent, called Daddy's Home.

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