Patrick Jarenwattananon

Patrick Jarenwattananon appears in the following:

Institutions in remote Honduras are permeated by organized drug crime

Friday, January 07, 2022

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with veteran journalist Carlos Dada, founder of El Faro newspaper, about his latest reporting from Honduras.

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Dozens are reported dead in Kazakhstan, where an anti-government revolt is underway

Thursday, January 06, 2022

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Melinda Haring, Deputy Director for Atlantic Council's Eurasia Center, on the situation in Kazakhstan and its implications for the rest of the world.

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2 reporters who were in the Capitol on Jan. 6 talk about media coverage of the attack

Wednesday, January 05, 2022

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with reporters Lisa Desjardins and Sarah Ferris about media coverage around the Jan. 6 insurrection and attack on the Capitol.

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Twitters gone viral: album of endangered bird songs charts in Australia

Tuesday, January 04, 2022

Songs of Disappearance is an collection of bird calls from 53 threatened Australian species. And for a brief spell, it was a best-selling album.

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NPR staff remembers the voices they can't stop thinking about

Friday, December 31, 2021

All Things Considered staff reflect on the stories and voices from the program that moved them in 2021.

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Americans didn't count down the new year until the 1970s

Friday, December 31, 2021

Looking back, countdowns weren't always good news. Think atomic bomb tests. Americans also counted down moon missions and Top 40 hits. It wasn't until 1979 that a Times Square crowd joined in.

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Why we count down on New Year's Eve (and why it wasn't always the case)

Friday, December 31, 2021

These days, a New Year's Eve celebration doesn't feel complete without one thing: a countdown. But that ritual to ring in the new year isn't as old as you might think.

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Hong Kong police close pro-democracy outlet Stand News

Wednesday, December 29, 2021

In Hong Kong, authorities from the police's national security department arrested half a dozen senior staff members, confiscated boxes and closed one of the last pro-democracy outlets, Stand News.

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Logic's song '1-800-273-8255' may have led to hundreds of fewer suicides, study finds

Tuesday, December 28, 2021

In 2017, the rapper Logic named a song after the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline phone number. A new study has found it may have had a remarkable impact.

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What teens talk about when they talk about race

Monday, December 27, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Zoë Jenkins, Miranda Zanca and Ichtaca Lira, reporters for YR Media, about their series "Teens in America."

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Did a song by the rapper Logic lead to fewer suicides?

Friday, December 24, 2021

When rapper Logic's song "1-800-273-8255" — the digits for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline — came out, the hotline started getting more calls.

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Lights between houses in Baltimore neighborhood show connection in pandemic holidays

Friday, December 24, 2021

In 2020, a Baltimore man strung holiday lights across the street to remind his neighbor of the connection they shared despite pandemic isolation. Soon, others hopped on their rooftops to do the same.

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3 nurses give their inside story on how omicron is affecting the country

Friday, December 24, 2021

Here's how their hospitals are doing nearly two years into the pandemic, what they are seeing in new omicron patients, and their thoughts on the wave of burnout affecting the industry.

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The Trump supporters who went from planning the Jan. 6 rally to aiding the riot probe

Thursday, December 23, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with reporter Hunter Walker, who wrote a Rolling Stone article on Dustin Stockton and Jennifer Lynn Lawrence, the Trump supporters now cooperating with the Jan. 6 House panel.

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3 nurses discuss what 2021 has been like for them on the front lines of the pandemic

Thursday, December 23, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with three nurses from around the country about how the omicron variant has affected their work and what their year has been like on the front lines of the pandemic.

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Kellogg's workers end 11-week strike with a new contract

Tuesday, December 21, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with HuffPost labor reporter Dave Jamieson about the announced end to the Kellogg's strike in Michigan.

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Kentucky native on losing his home in deadly tornadoes

Tuesday, December 21, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Matthew Brazzel, a Kentucky native who lost his home in deadly tornadoes on Dec. 10. Some of Brazzel's family photos have been found across the border in Indiana.

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Deqa Dhalac is the first Somali-American mayor in the United States

Tuesday, December 21, 2021

After fleeing Somalia some 30 years ago, Dhalac became this country's first Somali-American mayor earlier this month, elected in a city that's 90% white.

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A conversation with the country's 1st Somali-American mayor

Friday, December 17, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Deqa Dhalac, who recently became the first Somali-American mayor in the United States.

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In historic deal, Bruce Springsteen sells his masters for $500 million

Thursday, December 16, 2021

Bruce Springsteen has reportedly sold Sony his masters for a value north of $500 million. NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Billboard's Melinda Newman on why music icons have recently decided to cash in.

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