Mary Louise Kelly

Mary Louise Kelly appears in the following:

In 'The Perfectionists' Simon Winchester Looks At History Of Precision Engineering

Monday, May 07, 2018

NPR's Mary Louise speaks to author Simon Winchester about how precision in technology has developed since the Industrial Age to today's cutting-edge developments occurring around the world.

Comment

Leon Bridges Remixes His Retro Style To 'Move The Sound Forward'

Friday, May 04, 2018

The singer talks about branching out from '60s soul, writing honest love songs and experimenting with new sounds on his second album, Good Thing.

Comment

Ahead Of Annual NRA Convention, A Member Says It's Sacrificing His Rights

Thursday, May 03, 2018

As the NRA opens its annual meeting Friday, it faces criticism — and not just from gun control advocates. Some gun owners, like Tim Harmsen, are unhappy with the organization's recent compromises.

Comment

North Korean Defector Hopes To See Loved Ones Again — But Remains Skeptical

Tuesday, May 01, 2018

Hyeonseo Lee left North Korea when she was 17. Now 38, she calls the recent meeting between Kim Jong Un and President Moon Jae-in "stunning," and says her greatest hope is reunification.

Comment

Why Former CIA Director John Brennan's Criticism Of Trump Is Extremely Rare

Friday, April 27, 2018

Former CIA Director John Brennan is out of the agency but not the public eye. He's made a point of attacking President Trump ever since his Inauguration. Critics say that can sow discord, but Brennan says he's doing what he thinks is right.

Comment

Free To Speak, Ex-CIA Chief John Brennan Takes On Trump

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Since retiring last year, the former spymaster has been a relentless critic of the president. He says pulling back from existing international agreements is particularly risky.

Comment

In 'The Burning Shores,' Libya Blossoms — Briefly — Before Unraveling

Friday, April 13, 2018

Author Frederic Wehrey's new book follows the country's turmoil after the overthrow and death of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Though signs of normalcy have returned, Wehry says there's still deep trauma.

Comment

Could Syrian President Bashar al-Assad Be Tried As A War Criminal?

Thursday, April 12, 2018

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Alex Whiting, a former prosecutor at the International Criminal Court and Harvard law professor, to get a sense of how war crimes charges against Assad could work.

Comment

Media Or Tech Company? Facebook's Profile Is Blurry

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Regulators, and sometimes the public, still have a tough time getting a handle on just what Facebook is. And that makes it difficult to determine just which laws should govern it.

Comment

Most Americans Feel They've Lost Control Of Their Online Data

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Firms like Facebook use a business model that makes use of people's data. But not all data is created equal. Sharing purchasing habits? Most say that's OK. But private communications? No way.

Comment

Meg Wolitzer's 'Female Persuasion' Honors The Women Who Helped Her On Her Way

Friday, April 06, 2018

Wolitzer's new novel tells the story of two women: an 18-year-old college freshman and the famous feminist who befriends and inspires her.

Comment

Former National Guard Chief On What A 2006 Border Deployment Tells Us Today

Friday, April 06, 2018

The last major deployment of the National Guard to the border was overseen in 2006 by retired Lt. Gen. H. Steven Blum. He says their work freed Border Patrol agents to focus on their primary job.

Comment

What Chinese Tariffs Targeting American Crops Will Mean For Farmers

Monday, April 02, 2018

Newly announced Chinese tariffs will raise prices on many U.S. crops. How will that affect American farmers? NPR's Mary Louise Kelley spoke with Jim Zion, a Californian nut distributor, to find out.

Comment

How One Woman's Story Helped Set #MeToo In Motion In Russia

Friday, March 23, 2018

Sexual harassment has long been swept under the carpet in Russia. But by going on the record with her allegations against a powerful politician, a young journalist has raised awareness of the problem.

Comment

An 'Anna Karenina' For Our Times At Moscow's Bolshoi Theatre

Friday, March 23, 2018

The world-famous ballet company is iconic in Russia. Principal dancer Olga Smirnova says a new staging of a beloved epic takes it into the 21st century.

Comment

After Election Landslide, It's Putin's Russia (More Than Ever)

Monday, March 19, 2018

Vladimir Putin wanted a mandate to govern, and got it, with 76 percent of the vote. He will use the next six years to advance his mission: cementing Russia's role as a major player on the world stage.

Comment

Russian Journalist Weighs In On Country's #MeToo Movement

Monday, March 19, 2018

In Russia, a small number of women have spoken out publicly against powerful men who they say have sexually harassed them. Journalist Daria Zhuk is one of them. She says a powerful politician sexually harassed her in 2014 and that Russian women can learn from the #MeToo movement in America.

Comment

Russians In Moscow Celebrate 6 More Years Of Putin

Monday, March 19, 2018

On Sunday, Vladimir Putin won the Russian presidential election by a landslide. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly was in Moscow to witness the late-night celebrations of another six years of Putin in power.

Comment

Russia's Bolshoi Theatre Brings Anna Karenina Ballet To Modern Era

Monday, March 19, 2018

The world-famous Bolshoi Theatre is a Russian icon. But a new staging of the ballet Anna Karenina takes the beloved Russian epic — and the theater — into the 21st century. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Bolshoi principal dancer Olga Smirnova.

Comment

From Pride To Protest: How Russians Feel About Their Presidential Election

Friday, March 16, 2018

Ahead of Sunday's presidential election in Russia, NPR spoke with a Putin supporter, an opposition supporter and a Russian who sees no point in voting.

Comment