Streams

Soterios Johnson

Before you ask... it's Greek. And, so is Johnson (via translation). It's a long story... Soterios Johnson seemed strangely drawn to the news, even as a young child.

As a kid he would lull himself to sleep listening to WCBS NewsRadio 88. "As a kid, I always wanted to be in the know... and to spread the word," he says. In high school, Soterios worked at a small FM station in his hometown in New Jersey, followed by a four-year stint as an undergraduate at Columbia on WKCR, New York. He was an Associate Producer at Newsweek On Air and worked in the field of science journalism for several years. He earned his master's degree at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism.

Soterios Johnson appears in the following:

The Future Looks Shiny, Big and Expensive

Monday, May 18, 2015

"By building something so remarkable and extravagant, the question is, do you price out the very people you want to include?”

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It's Brooklyn, 2015. Do We Still Need a Museum?

Thursday, May 14, 2015

"“I just had this crazy idea, why there isn’t a place where we can all be together?” said Dustin Yellin, founder of Pioneer Works, a non-traditional art space.  

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Could Technology Have Prevented the Amtrak Derailment?

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Despite pressure from Congress and safety regulators, Amtrak has not yet installed a system known as positive train control along the section of track in question.

Comments [2]

Remember Print Magazines? Here's a New One

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

A New York art critic is launching Even, featuring essays, reviews and interviews.

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'It’s the Loneliest Job in the Planet'

Monday, May 11, 2015

As the Brooklyn Museum is looking for a new leader, we explore what museum directors do, and what we expect from them.

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Seeking Museum Leader: Must Love Brooklyn, Not Manhattan

Thursday, May 07, 2015

"The love child of Bjork and Seinfeld" should be the next director of the Brooklyn Museum, said comedian Negin Farsad. "That would get the craziest, funniest stuff."

Comments [2]

New Whitney: Come for the View, Stay for the Art

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Glass walls and four terraces facing the High Line park are some of the highlights of the new building designed by Renzo Piano. Two critics offer their reviews in this audio tour.

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A Complex Iran, in Film

Friday, April 10, 2015

"About Elly" focuses on a group of college friends who are spending a fun weekend at the beach that turns into a tale of deception and the struggle between modernity and tradition.

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Basquiat and Lawrence as Social Activists

Friday, April 10, 2015

Two new exhibits show how Jean-Michel Basquiat and Jacob Lawrence fought to portray the African-American experience in a white art world.

Comments [1]

The Woman in Gold: Masterpiece or Meh?

Friday, April 03, 2015

Neue Gallerie founder Ronald Lauder, who bought this painting for $135 million, says it’s the best in the museum’s collection. But WNYC's art critic says it's pretty underwhelming.

Comments [9]

It's Snowing Here as the Rest of the World Bakes

Friday, March 20, 2015

The northeastern United States bucked the global warming trend this winter, experiencing cooler-than-normal temperatures.

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Lincoln, the Jews and Sore Feet

Friday, March 20, 2015

A new exhibit shows the American president opposed anti-Semitism, which was rampant even among the generals in the Union army, and relied on a Jewish doctor to cure his troubled toes. 

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Orphans, Slaves and Cabaret: Four Playwrights Take on History

Thursday, March 19, 2015

A hip-hop musical about a founding father; two irreverent takes on slavery; a 24-hour play about life in America from 1776 to 2016. Here's how four playwrights are telling U.S. history.

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Björk at MoMA: 'Abominable'

Friday, March 06, 2015

For WNYC's art critic Deborah Solomon, the museum's mid-career retrospective of the pop-artist is too much about the worship of a celebrity, and not enough about art.

Comments [19]

Could Climate Change Spur Revolutions?

Tuesday, March 03, 2015

A new study asserts that global warming contributed to a three-year long drought in Syria, setting the stage for a civil war.

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Local Muslim Leader: ISIS Arrests in Brooklyn Do Not Signal an Epidemic

Thursday, February 26, 2015

WNYC
Linda Sarsour of the Arab-American Association of New York says the number of U.S. Muslims who have left the country to join the self-proclaimed Islamic State is relatively small.

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Screen Versus Self in the Museum

Thursday, February 26, 2015

"Do we exist or are our lives on the screen more authentic than what takes place everyday in our kitchen?" asks art critic Deborah Solomon after visiting the New Museum's Triennial.

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National Flood Insurance Was Once Just Broke; Now It Looks Broken

Friday, February 20, 2015

Homeowners say they've been systematically cheated — the government promises reform.

Comments [2]

August Wilson, the American Shakespeare

Friday, February 20, 2015

“His body of work really covers the whole 20th century of American history,” said filmmaker Sam Pollard.

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On Kawara: Mysterious, and Obsessed with Time and Place

Friday, February 13, 2015

The Guggenheim presents the work of the Japanese conceptual artist who did paintings recording the date they were made — and never gave one interview. 

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