Streams

Matthew Schuerman

Editor, WNYC

Matthew Schuerman joined WNYC in December 2007 as the transportation and economic development reporter. He covered repeated financial crises at the MTA, the most severe transit cuts in decades, as well as the impact of the recession on the Atlantic Yards project in Brooklyn and the World Trade Center redevelopment in Lower Manhattan. Since 2010, Schuerman has been an editor in the WNYC newsroom. In addition, he has recently reported a number of Sandy-related stories.

Schuerman came to radio from The New York Observer, where he also covered economic development. Earlier, he was an associate editor at Worth Magazine, and free-lanced for The Village Voice, Fortune, City Limits, and other publications.

Schuerman has been a fan of WNYC since the mid-1990s, when he was working as a reporter at The Day, a daily newspaper in New London, Conn. Though 100 miles away from New York, he could get Brian Lehrer and Leonard Lopate on his car radio while driving along Interstate 95 on his daily rounds, thanks to how the AM signal travels over the Long Island Sound.

A native of Chicago, Schuerman graduated from Harvard College magna cum laude. He received a master's degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Matthew Schuerman appears in the following:

Learning to Love the Entirely Inadequate but Completely Indispensable Disaster Industry

Friday, October 31, 2014

Huge storms like Katrina and Sandy are here to stay; the firms that manage recoveries should be, too. But if this is going to work, five big things need to change.

Comment

The Other Industry That’s Too Big to Fail

Thursday, October 30, 2014

WWNO
New Jersey Public Radio
NJ Spotlight
Only a few large companies are able to manage disaster recovery efforts. That's how New Jersey and Louisiana ended up hiring and firing the same two firms.

Comments [3]

It's Been Two Years, but We're not Prepared for Another Sandy

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Con Edison says Lower Manhattan won't black out again, but the region hasn't built much of what it needs to be resilient.

Comment

In Case of Hurricane, Take the R or the G Lines to Work

Monday, October 27, 2014

Two years after Sandy, the MTA's sealed two subway tunnels under the East River (at least theoretically), but has lots of other work to do.
Read More

Comment

Senior U.S. Public Health Official Slams NJ/NY Ebola Quarantine

Sunday, October 26, 2014

An expert in communicable diseases says Christie's and Cuomo's policy will dissuade aid workers from traveling abroad to help block the outbreak at its source.

Comment

Podcast: When Climate Change Comes to the City of the Future

Friday, October 17, 2014

When New York was built, filling in wetlands and paving over grass with asphalt didn't cause a climate crisis. Now it does. 

Comment

How Will We Live in 2050?

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

How will climate change impact New York City by 2050? Matthew Schuerman and Janice Huff talk about the series that looks at climate change and the ramifications for our city.

Comments [1]

Future Storms Could Lead to Financial Disaster

Sunday, October 12, 2014

In 2050, a storm comparable to Sandy could cause $90 billion of damage. That's 4.5 times the damage the storm inflicted in 2012—equal to the entire economy of Ecuador.

Comments [1]

Extreme High Tides Could Flood Our City's Streets

Sunday, October 12, 2014

The sea level around Manhattan increased a foot over the past century. By 2050, scientists predict it will climb another 18 inches, making mild storms as destructive as hurricanes.

Comments [1]

Forecast Calls for More Rain Than We Can Handle

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Current predictions find the New York City of 2050 will have more frequent heavy rainstorms, which means in a city with an aging sewer system, it's going to be messy.

Comments [1]

As Temperatures Climb, So Does the Risk of Blackouts

Sunday, October 12, 2014

As it is, New York City sets a new record for electricity demand every year or two. No one can be sure what 2050 will bring, but if we're not ready, the grid could fail.   

Comments [3]

The Science Behind NYC 2050

Sunday, October 12, 2014

There is no single widely accepted model for projecting climate change. Instead, there are 35 of them.

Comment

New York City Could Get as Hot as Alabama in 2050

Sunday, October 12, 2014

By 2050, NYC will likely experience 45 days at or above 90 degrees Farenheit. That's a month and a half of sweltering days, which could be deadly.  

Comments [10]

Arrested Development: Housing Stalls at Barclays Center Arena

Friday, October 10, 2014

WNYC
Forest City Ratner began exploring modular construction to cut costs as it began to build thousands of apartments. But a dispute with a contractor has put the idea on hold.

Comments [3]

The 8% Solution: City Asks for Help to Bolster Low-Lying Coast

Thursday, October 02, 2014

WNYC
Some 43 miles of waterfront could be flooded on daily basis due to sea level rise by 2050. The city is asking experts how to prevent that.

Comment

Grizzlies Move in Where Polar Bears Once Tread

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

The bears, who naturally roam further south than their arctic cousins, are more in line with the zoo's conservation efforts in the wild.

Comment

Some On Staten Island Opt For Buyout Of 'Houses That Don't Belong'

Friday, September 19, 2014

As part of the ongoing recovery from Hurricane Sandy, New York's plan is to buy and demolish hundreds of homes on Staten and Long islands and let nature return as a barrier to future storm surges.

Comment

What's the Worst Weather that Could Happen? A Repeat of the Storm of 1821.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

New research on a 19th-century storm suggests Sandy was bad but not exceptional.

Comments [2]

Sandy Recovery Costs Up 50% and City Calls That a Victory

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Back-office work for the city's Build it Back program turned out to be more time-consuming to handle.

Comments [2]

Beware the Light Box Effect — and Other Secrets of NYC's Microclimates

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

It's only a few degrees, but when a heat wave comes, variations in temperature across Manhattan could spell the difference between life and death.  

Comments [4]