Mary Louise Kelly

Mary Louise Kelly appears in the following:

How The Culture Of Black Pain Can Both Hurt And Help Black Americans

Friday, April 23, 2021

NPR's Mary Louse Kelly talks with African Americans and the Culture of Pain author Debra Walker King about how Black pain can be a double-edged sword, used to both benefit and hurt Black Americans.

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Digital Underground's Shock G, Legend Behind 'The Humpty Dance' Dead At 57

Friday, April 23, 2021

Shock G, the frontman for the hip-hop group Digital Underground, died yesterday at 57. He was best known for the song "The Humpty Dance," and helped launch the career of Tupac Shakur.

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As At-Home Coronavirus Tests Hit Pharmacies, What Role Can They Play In The Pandemic?

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Rapid COVID-19 tests are now available at pharmacies in the U.S. Dr. Michael Mina of Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health says these can help people wondering if they are infectious right now.

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In The Wake Of Chauvin's Conviction, A Look Back At The Origins Of American Policing

Thursday, April 22, 2021

In the wake of Derek Chauvin's conviction for the murder of George Floyd, we examine the tension that has existed between African American communities and the police for centuries.

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Archaeologists Discover Earliest Example Of Dog Domestication In Arabia

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Archaeologists have discovered remains of the earliest example of dog domestication on the Arabian Peninsula, providing a look into pet ownership 6,000 years ago.

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Minneapolis Mayor Says He Welcomes Justice Department Policing Investigation

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey says his city is taking more steps to change policing following the murder conviction of Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

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Cuba's Communists Change Leadership, But Likely Not Much Else

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Patrick Oppmann, a CNN reporter based in Havana, about what it means for Cuba that a Castro is not at the helm for the first time in more than sixty years.

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Location Of Harriet Tubman's Home Discovered

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Archaeologists have finally uncovered the location of Harriet Tubman's house, where she spent her formative teenage years before she escaped enslavement. Their clue was a Lady Liberty coin dated 1808.

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Nigella Lawson On How To Find Peace While Cooking

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with cookbook writer Nigella Lawson about her latest book Cook, Eat, Repeat and how to stop viewing cooking as tedious and, instead, find peace in the kitchen.

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Masks Remain Extremely Effective Indoors, But Are They Necessary Outside?

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Unless people are packed together, "there really just is not much spread happening outdoors," Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University's School of Public Health says.

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George Floyd's Friend Speaks About Chauvin's Verdict

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Ronnie Lillard, friend of George Floyd, about his reaction to Tuesday's verdict.

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Chauvin Found Guilty On All Charges

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

A verdict has been reached in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin. The former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

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Manchester City And Chelsea To Pull Out Of Newly-Formed Football League

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelley talks with Rob Harris, sports writer for the Associated Press about how Manchester United and Chelsea say they won't join the European Super League.

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Outdoor Mask Mandates Could Lift Soon, According To Ashish Jha Of Brown University

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Ashish Jha, Dean of Brown University School of Public Health, who says outdoor transmission of COVID-19 is low and states may soon lift outdoor mask mandates.

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Chad's Military Says President Killed On Battlefield

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Chad's President Idriss Déby, who ruled the country for more than 30 years, is dead. An army spokesman says Déby died after sustaining injuries on the front line of a battle against rebel forces.

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How The Pandemic Changed The College Admissions Selection Process This Year

Monday, April 19, 2021

Colleges around the country faced an admissions season marked by pandemic-era challenges: dropped testing requirements, remote learning, disrupted extracurriculars and record applicant pools.

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Bubble Tea Without Boba: Shortage Leaves Many Wondering When Tapioca Will Return

Monday, April 19, 2021

Without enough workers to unload shipping containers, the pandemic has caused another shortage of products: boba pearls used to make bubble tea.

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Proposed Breakaway European Super League Outrages Soccer World

Monday, April 19, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Roger Bennett, co-anchor of the Men In Blazers podcast, about the proposed breakaway European Super League and the impact such a move would have on soccer.

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Joy, Relief In Airports As Australia And New Zealand Open 'Travel Bubble'

Monday, April 19, 2021

Australia and New Zealand have launched one of the world's first "travel bubbles" between countries. People traveling between the two now no longer have to quarantine upon landing.

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What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

Saturday, April 17, 2021

In the U.S., more than 1 out of 5 residents is fully vaccinated against COVID-19. But elsewhere in the world, vaccination rates are much lower. Some poor nations have yet to receive a single dose.

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