appears in the following:

'1,000% Win In My Book': Former College Athlete Reacts To SCOTUS Decision

Monday, June 21, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Martin Jenkins, a former Clemson football player who sued the NCAA seven years ago. He testified that he felt he had to prioritize athletics over academics.

Comment

How The U.S. Can Control Its Financial Presence In Afghanistan When Troops Leave

Tuesday, June 15, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with John F. Sopko, special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction. He's calling for continued oversight of U.S. funding there as American presence declines.

Comment

Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean

Friday, June 11, 2021

National Geographic has recognized the Southern Ocean as the fifth official ocean. The cartographic update doesn't surprise researchers who study the importance of the waters surrounding Antarctica.

Comment

Irish Minister For European Affairs On Belarus' Forced Diversion To Arrest Journalist

Monday, May 24, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Thomas Byrne, Ireland's Minister for European Affairs, about Belarus' forced diversion of an international passenger flight to remove an opposition journalist.

Comment

Why People Are Upset About The Flamin' Hot Cheetos Story

Thursday, May 20, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Los Angeles Times columnist Gustavo Arellano about the Flamin' Hot Cheetos controversy and the historical erasure of Mexicans in American food culture.

Comment

A Fungus Is Pushing Cicada Sex Into Hyperdrive And Leaving Them Dismembered

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

A fungus called Massospora produces an amphetamine in some cicadas and makes them lose control. Cicadas that are infected lose their genitals — and they don't even notice.

Comment

Drugged Cicadas Mate Like Wild After Their Butts Fall Off

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

A fungus with psychedelic properties has infected a small percentage of Brood X cicadas which might cause the bugs to lose part of their body and mate like wild afterward.

Comment

What Does A Path Forward Look Like For Israel And Palestinians?

Friday, May 14, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Mkhaimar Abusada, political science professor at Al-Azhar University in Gaza, and Israeli political analyst Akiva Eldar, about paths to a ceasefire in Israel.

Comment

2 Weeks After Your Last Vaccine Dose, You Can Shed Your Mask

Thursday, May 13, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky about the new guidance that fully vaccinated people don't need masks indoors and how the Pfizer vaccine is now available to kids 12-15.

Comment

Gov. Kate Brown On Oregon's COVID-19 Spike

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Oregon Gov. Kate Brown about the recent spike in coronavirus cases in her state and her plans on reopening the economy.

Comment

Meet America's Newest Chess Master, 10-Year-Old Tanitoluwa Adewumi

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

At 10 years old, Tanitoluwa Adewumi just became one of the youngest chess masters in the United States — and he's not done yet. He says he hopes to become the world's youngest grandmaster.

Comment

Gov. Gavin Newsom On California's Huge Budget Surplus, Recall Election

Monday, May 10, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Gov. Gavin Newsom, D-Calif., who is facing a recall election, about his economic recovery plan that would give $600 stimulus checks to more Californians.

Comment

As Campus Life Resumes, So Does Concern Over Hazing

Tuesday, May 04, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Hank Nuwer about concerns that a pandemic-induced lull in hazing-related deaths may reverse as college students return to campus.

Comment

Rev. Al Sharpton Reflects After Delivering Andrew Brown Jr.'s Eulogy

Monday, May 03, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Rev. Al Sharpton, who delivered the eulogy at the funeral of Andrew Brown, Jr. He talks about the family's request to deliver special remarks and reflections.

Comment

Wave Of 'Anti-Protest' Bills Could Threaten First Amendment

Friday, April 30, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Nick Robinson, of the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, about the dozens of anti-protest bills introduced by Republican lawmakers this year.

Comment

As Michigan Virus Cases Surge, State Would Rather Add Vaccinations Than Restrictions

Friday, April 16, 2021

Coronavirus cases are surging in Michigan. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, Michigan's chief medical executive, about the state's decision not to implement new restrictions.

Comment

Congressman On Capitol Police Inspector General Testimony

Thursday, April 15, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Democratic Congressman Pete Aguilar of California about the testimony by the Capitol Police inspector general regarding the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Comment

Republicans Meet Biden's Infrastructure Plan With Skepticism

Monday, April 12, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Republican Congressman Garret Graves of Louisiana about President Biden's meeting with a bipartisan group of members of Congress about his infrastructure proposal.

Comment

Iranian Nuclear Site Hit With Blackout In Suspected Attack

Monday, April 12, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace about the suspected attack on an Iranian nuclear site over the weekend.

Comment

Kidnappings in Haiti Surge As Country Plunges Deeper Into Political Turmoil

Monday, April 12, 2021

NPR's host Mary Louise Kelly talks with Jacqueline Charles of The Miami Herald about the alarming rise in kidnappings in Haiti, including seven members of the Catholic clergy taken on Sunday.

Comment