appears in the following:

The race-shifting of 'Pretendians'

Wednesday, February 23, 2022

The number of people who identify as Native American on the U.S. Census has soared in recent years, which raises a lot of concerns in Native communities about people falsely claiming Native identity.

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Looking for a laugh? Here are some of NPR's favorite funny books of 2021

Saturday, December 11, 2021

Want to read and laugh? From NPR's yearly reading list, Books We Love, four NPR staffers offer their suggestions.

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The white ghosts haunting Native Americans in 'The Sentence'

Tuesday, November 23, 2021

Louise Erdrich's novel turns the trope of the haunted Indian burial ground on its head with the story of a Native-run bookstore being visited by the ghost of a white woman obsessed with indigeneity.

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Tiny Desk Playlist: Celebrating Native American Heritage Month

Friday, November 12, 2021

Native American artists have brought an incredibly diverse array of sounds and styles to the Tiny Desk, representing just a slice of the breadth and beauty of Indigenous art.

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Raye Zaragoza: Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

Wednesday, November 10, 2021

The Akimel Oʼotham folk singer performs four songs for her Tiny Desk (home) concert.

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Ya Tseen: Tiny Desk (Home) Concert

Tuesday, November 09, 2021

From the Sheet'ka Kwaan Naa Kahidi community house, the Southeast Alaskan artist uses a combination of electronic and acoustic elements to fuel his Tiny Desk home concert.

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Comedian Joe Pera wants you to get comfortable — preferably in the right chair

Sunday, November 07, 2021

Most television shows feel like they're made by an energy drink, Joe Pera says. He wanted his to feel like it was made by apple cider.

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What Lorde's Te Reo Maori Songs Mean For The Effort To Revive The Language

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Pop singer Lorde has released an EP in te reo Maori, the Native language in her home country of New Zealand. Maori artists say that this is just one branch of a larger movement to revive the language.

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Indian Boarding Schools' Traumatic Legacy, And The Fight To Get Native Ancestors Back

Saturday, August 28, 2021

After discoveries of more than 1,300 bodies at Canada's residential schools, the U.S. is now facing a crucial moment of reckoning with its own history of Native American boarding schools.

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Blinkin' In The Rain: Florida Bill Would Allow Hazard Lights In Stormy Weather

Thursday, May 27, 2021

A provision tucked away in a 38-page transportation bill grants Florida drivers the right to turn on their hazard lights while in motion.

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This Contender For The World's Longest Cheesesteak Spans 3 City Blocks

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

A group of chefs in South Philly's Italian Market set out to break the record for world's longest cheesesteak on Monday. The resulting hoagie spanned three blocks and caused some traffic issues.

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A 'Shot' At $1 Million? Local Governments Offering Incentives For Vaccines

Thursday, May 13, 2021

Free hunting license in Maine, free beer in New Jersey and a chance to win $1 million in Ohio. Across the country, cities and state are offering incentives to get people vaccinated against COVID-19.

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Pennies From (Almost) Heaven: Get Paid To Move To West Virginia

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

A program called Ascend West Virginia hopes to draw remote workers to the Mountain State, even to the point of paying $12,000 to selected applicants.

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Set In Stone? Franco-Belgian Border Moved By Bold Farmer And A Boulder

Thursday, May 06, 2021

The border between France and Belgium was recently redrawn, but not due to a political dispute. A farmer moved a stone off his land and, in doing so, inadvertently made Belgium slightly bigger.

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Au Revoir, Yahoo! Answers

Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Yahoo! Answers shut down Tuesday after nearly 16 years of inquiries from the internet's curious minds. As a final send-off, NPR gets to the bottom of some of these important questions.

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'Citizen Kane' Has A Rotten Day

Thursday, April 29, 2021

For years, Orson Welles' Citizen Kane has been widely viewed as the greatest film ever made. But now an 80-year-old negative review has resurfaced, bringing its Rotten Tomatoes score down from 100%.

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Rutherford Falls Creators On Finding Humor In America's 'Messy' History

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with comedy writers Michael Schur and Sierra Teller Ornelas about coming to terms with America's messy history, and turning discomfort into the sitcom "Rutherford Falls."

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In 'Crying In H Mart' Michelle Zauner Grapples With Food, Grief And Identity

Thursday, April 22, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Michelle Zauner, a musician who performs under the name Japanese Breakfast, about her memoir, Crying in H Mart. It's an exploration of grief, food and identity.

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National Parks Should Be Controlled By Indigenous Tribes, One Writer Argues

Thursday, April 15, 2021

The National Parks Service has often been called "America's Best Idea." But David Treuer argues that, because that came at the cost of Native American homeland, they deserve to take control.

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'Howard The Printer' Makes An Impression On TikTok With Mini History Lessons

Thursday, March 25, 2021

A little-known hub of California history closed during the pandemic. But its in-house printing press expert, Howard Hatch, won millions of visitors for the Sacramento History Museum's TikTok account.

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