Streams

Sam Roberts

New York Times Reporter

Sam Roberts appears in the following:

What's Joe Lhota's Path?

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Now that we know the matchup for November's mayoral election, can Republican Joe Lhota actually win in deep blue New York City - particularly when Bill de Blasio made such a successful appeal to a variety of identity groups? Reihan Salam, senior fellow at R Street, contributor to The National Review and CNN, discusses what he and fellow New York Republicans want to see from Lhota. And New York Times urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts breaks down the demographic challenges Lhota faces -- plus the types of Democrats he'll have to win over.

Comments [22]

Grand Central Terminal at 100

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

When Grand Central Terminal opened in 1913, it immediately became one of the most beautiful and recognizable Manhattan landmarks, and to celebrate its centennial, Sam Roberts of The New York Times looks back at Grand Central's conception, history, and the cultural effects the station has had on busy commuters and tourists. His book Grand Central: How a Train Station Transformed America looks at the way the station spurred suburban expansion and fostered the nation's westward movement via the railroad.

Comments [5]

Raising Manhattanites

Friday, August 12, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for The New York Times, looks at the new census numbers showing more children under five living in Manhattan, but fewer children city-wide.

»» Check out WNYC's census maps below

Comments [3]

Leaving New York

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

E.J. McMahon, senior fellow for Tax and Budgetary Studies at the Manhattan Institute and director of the Empire Center for New York State Policy, and Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for the New York Times, explain the migration of New Yorkers over time, and how the latest report from the Empire Center fits with census data.

Comments [47]

Raising Manhattanites

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for The New York Times, looks at the new census numbers showing more children under five living in Manhattan, but fewer children city-wide.

»» Check out WNYC's census maps below

Comments [3]

Census Results: Final Numbers

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, joins us as our weekly guest this month to talk about the census results and what they show about Americans and New Yorkers. In his final segment with us in this series, he digs deep into the NYC and metropolitan area census figures.

→ Listen, Read a Recap, and Explore Maps at It's A Free Country

Census Results: Poverty Rate in New York

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, is a weekly guest for the month of March. Each week he talks about the 2010 Census results and what they reveal about Americans and New Yorkers. This week he discusses poverty.

→  Listen, Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's a Free Country

Census Results: Poverty Rate in New York

Thursday, March 24, 2011

WNYC
[T]he total number for New York City is disappointingly low according to city officials, lower than the 8.4 million they were expecting, and the chances are they’re going to challenge that count as being way too low.

— Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [6]

Census Results: The Hispanic Vote

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, is a weekly guest for the month of March. Each week he talks about the 2010 Census results and what they reveal about Americans and New Yorkers. This week he discusses how the Hispanic population has expanded.

→  Listen, Read a Recap, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

Census Results: The Hispanic Vote

Thursday, March 17, 2011

On The Brian Lehrer Show today at 10:40 am.  Audio and a recap of this conversation will be posted here by 1pm.

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, is a weekly guest for the month of March. Each week he talks about the 2010 Census results and what they reveal about Americans and New Yorkers. This week he discusses how the Hispanic population has expanded.

Comments [5]

Census Results: Garden State Changes

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, is a weekly guest for the month of March. Each week he talks about the 2010 Census results and what they reveal about Americans and New Yorkers. This week he discusses New Jersey.

→  Hear Audio, Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's a Free Country

What To Watch For In The Census: Borough-by-Borough

Thursday, March 03, 2011

When you look at Queens Village, you have a couple square blocks in which there are 400 residents from Central and South America; 300 from south Asia; 300 from southeast Asia; almost 200 from eastern Europe; more than 100 from the Caribbean; more than 100 from east Asia; as well as 500 born in the United States. Now that is diversity, and you don’t see that in many places in the world.

-- Sam Roberts of the New York Times, on the Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [2]

Census Results: By The Numbers

Thursday, March 03, 2011

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, is a weekly guest for the month of March. Each week he talks about the 2010 Census results and what they reveal about Americans and New Yorkers. This week he discusses the "shifting ethnic mosaic" of New York City's five boroughs.

→ Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Worst Commute

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for the New York Times, looks at the new census data that shows that the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island have the country's longest commute, among other revealing data.

Comments [16]

The Case of the Missing (200,000) Votes

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for The New York Times, discusses the discovery of nearly 200,000 unreported votes from the election night totals of the November elections.

Read More and Join the Conversation at It's a Free Country

Comments [8]

Anecdotal Census: Wrap up

Monday, September 06, 2010

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for The New York Times, Angelo Falcón, president and founder of the National Institute for Latino Policy, and Andrew Beveridge, professor of sociology at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center and developer of socialexplorer.com, wrap up our census coverage with a discussion of the overall demographic trends of the last 10 years in the New York City metropolitan area. 

Comments [1]

Anecdotal Census: Wrap up

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent  for The New York Times,  Angelo Falcón, president and founder of the National Institute for Latino Policy, and Andrew Beveridge, professor of sociology at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center and developer of socialexplorer.com, wrap up our census coverage with a discussion of the overall demographic trends of the last 10 years in the New York City metropolitan area.

Comments [13]

The Lindsay Years

Wednesday, May 05, 2010

Sam Roberts, urban affairs correspondent for the New York Times, and editor of America’s Mayor: John V. Lindsay and the Reinvention of New York, and Tom Casciato, director of the documentary "Fun City Revisited: The Lindsay Years," discuss the controversial legacy of John V. Lindsay, who became mayor of ...

Comments [9]

National Census Outreach Picks Up Steam

Monday, March 15, 2010

Check your mailbox, you may have already received a letter warning of the imminent arrival of your mandatory census questionnaire. But did you know that answering those questions is vitally important for the funding of local, regional and nationally funded programs? Or that the information you put in remains confidential for 70 years?

Comments [2]

New Formula Finds Higher Rate of Elderly Living in Poverty

Thursday, March 04, 2010

The federal government is thinking about implementing a new formula to calculate poverty. The new formula would increase the number of poor from 13.2 percent to 15.8 percent. The striking change comes among the elderly, where under the new measure, 18.7 percent of people 65-years-old and over are under the poverty line. That's 7.1 million Americans and an increase from 9.7 percent.

Comments [7]