Sarah Handel

Sarah Handel appears in the following:

She was out in front of the fight to legalize abortion, but few know her name

Monday, October 11, 2021

Abortion-rights activist Patricia Maginnis died earlier this year at age 93. She's a lesser-known figure in the movement, but her ideas — which started as fringe — became mainstream.

Comment

Coming to terms with the COVID death of an estranged mother

Friday, October 08, 2021

We remember Holly Serl, one of more than 700,000 Americans who have died from the coronavirus.

Comment

Giants vs. Dodgers resumes 13 decades of rivalry (and more than a little hate)

Friday, October 08, 2021

On Friday, two of baseball's oldest rivals meet in the playoffs for the first time. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Evan Drellich of The Athletic about the history of the Giants and the Dodgers.

Comment

Young kids 5 to 11 are a one step closer to a COVID-19 vaccine

Thursday, October 07, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Dr. Grace Lee, a pediatrician and chair of the CDC's Committee on Immunization Practices, about what's ahead for approving vaccines for younger kids.

Comment

How Janet Jackson's 'Control' shook the room for decades

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

Janet Jackson's Control turns 35 this week. NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Sam Sanders of It's Been A Minute, who investigated the album's making and legacy to commemorate the anniversary.

Comment

Reggaeton rules Latinx music, but not at the Latin Grammys

Tuesday, October 05, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Julyssa Lopez, writer for Rolling Stone magazine, and NPR's Felix Contreras, about the controversy around this year's Latin Grammys nominations.

Comment

New documentary highlights the struggles of teenage farm workers in California

Monday, October 04, 2021

Fruits of Labor is a new documentary from director Emily Cohen Ibañez. It follows a teenage farm worker Ashley Pavon as she navigates working long hours and tries to graduate from high school.

Comment

How school administrators and parents are finding solutions to school bus shortage

Monday, October 04, 2021

As school bus shortages hinder K-12 students from returning to the classroom, a school superintendent and a parent speak to community driven solutions.

Comment

Remembering former TV news producer Clifford Feldman, lost to COVID

Friday, October 01, 2021

We remember Clifford Feldman, a former TV news producer who lived in Washington, D.C. Feldman was one of the nearly 700,000 Americans who have died from COVID.

Comment

Facebook's Own Research Says Its Apps Can Harm Mental Health. Senators Have Questions

Thursday, September 30, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Wall Street Journal reporter Jeff Horwitz about the Senate hearing where Facebook answered questions on the impact its products have on young people's mental health.

Comment

Pastor T.L. Barrett's Five Decades Spent As A Current For Our Sails

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with gospel artist Pastor T.L. Barrett, Jr., whose collected work was recently reissued in a box set called I Shall Wear a Crown.

Comment

Remembering Seminal Philosopher Charles W. Mills

Monday, September 27, 2021

Philosopher Charles W. Mills has died at 70. He upended the canon of Western philosophy, calling out the whiteness in the discipline and adding the dimension of race to dominant liberal frameworks.

Comment

Novelist Edwidge Danticat: Allow Haitians To Determine Their Own Future

Friday, September 24, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with award winning Haitian-American novelist Edwidge Danticat about the challenges in Haiti.

Comment

Remembering Sean Fletcher, Beloved Teacher And Brother In Arkansas, Lost To COVID

Friday, September 24, 2021

Sean Fletcher, a retired German and history teacher who loved sharing his passions with those around him, died of COVID-19 in December 2020. His brother remembers him for his knowledge and curiosity.

Comment

A U.S. Strike Recently Killed Afghan Civilians, But It's Far From The First Time

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Neta Crawford, co-director of the Cost of War Project, about civilian casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan at the hands of U.S. military strikes.

Comment

Newsom Won, But He Won Big With Latinos

Thursday, September 16, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Sonja Diaz, director of the Latino Policy and Politics Initiative at UCLA, about the significance of the Latino vote in California gubernatorial recall election.

Comment

State Health Officials Discuss Biden's Strategy To Slow The Delta Variant

Friday, September 10, 2021

NPR's Scott Detrow talks with Louisiana State Health Officer Dr. Joseph Kanter and Oregon Public Health Director Rachael Banks on President Biden's strategy to slow the new surge of coronavirus cases.

Comment

Biden's Coronavirus Response Coordinator Talks About New COVID Plan

Thursday, September 09, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with White House coronavirus response coordinator Jeff Zients about the Biden administration's new measures to curb COVID-19, like mandating vaccination in many workplaces.

Comment

Podcast Host On Escaping Nigeria's Twitter Ban

Thursday, September 09, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with podcast host Chika Uwazie about leaving Nigeria due to a political atmosphere which set off a social media crackdown, threats and economic consequences.

Comment

New Jersey Governor Wants More Hurricane Disaster Relief For Hard-Hit Counties

Tuesday, September 07, 2021

NPR'S Ailsa Chang speaks with New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy about the devastation Hurricane Ida brought and what state and federal governments are doing to provide assistance to those affected.

Comment