Nishant Dahiya

Nishant Dahiya appears in the following:

U.S. Announces Support For Waiving Intellectual Property Rights For COVID-19 Vaccines

Wednesday, May 05, 2021

Many countries have asked rich nations to waive the patent protections to vaccines so they can be cheaply manufactured elsewhere. The White House said it supports waiving intellectual property rights.

Comment

State Department Orders Departure Of Nonessential Personnel From Kabul Embassy

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

The order came Tuesday, amid concerns about heightened violence as U.S. and NATO troops depart Afghanistan. U.S. officials would not confirm the number of those leaving but insisted it would be small.

Comment

What Trump's Declassified Asia Strategy May Mean For U.S.-China Relations Under Biden

Saturday, January 23, 2021

Critics say by publicly releasing the document, the Trump administration was trying to bind the Biden administration while confirming China's worst fears about U.S. intentions.

Comment

Trio Of Books Shows A Southeast Asia Caught Between World Powers

Thursday, December 31, 2020

Three regional experts agree there's no desire in Southeast Asia to pick Washington over Beijing. U.S. strategy should look through the lens of the region itself — not just focus on containing China.

Comment

Timeline: The Unraveling Of U.S.-China Relations

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

On Tuesday, the Trump administration ordered China's Houston consulate to close, amping up tensions in already fraught relations. Here are some of the key developments reshaping U.S.-China relations.

Comment

A Look At Why 'Crime Pays' In Indian Politics

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Milan Vaishnav's new book, When Crime Pays: Money and Muscle in Indian Politics, examines why so many criminals become politicians in India — and why so many voters embrace them.

Comment

How The U.S. War In Laos Was Key To The 'Birth Of A Military CIA'

Monday, January 30, 2017

A new book by Joshua Kurlantzick examines how the U.S. involvement in Laos in the 1960s and 1970s transformed the CIA from an intelligence-gathering organization into a war-fighting one.

Comment

Trump And China: Intentionally Provocative Or Unprepared?

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Trump's campaign comments toward China were extremely strong, and we're likely to learn soon how much was rhetoric and how much will become actual policy.

Comment

Dozens Killed In Bombing Near Afghan Parliament

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

At least 30 people are dead and another 70 injured in a bombing near the Afghan Parliament in Kabul on Tuesday.

Comment

Weeping For All That Is Lost: A Harsh Migration Out Of India

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Sunjeev Sahota's new novel follows three men who journey from India to England, looking for a better life. But NPR's Nishant Dahiya says that life turns out to be a complex, and often dangerous one.

Comment

An Ancient Route Rolls On: Questions For Author Of 'The Silk Roads'

Friday, April 08, 2016

It's been centuries since camel caravans crisscrossed Eurasia along the Silk Roads. Now historian Peter Frankopan's new book puts the fabled roads at the center of a new view of world history.

Comment

'Hunters' Is A Dark, Elegant Tale Of East And West

Saturday, January 16, 2016

There's a familiar kind of book. A white man — specifically a Briton — in Asia. You can already sense him; aloof, condescending, assured. The world is his playground and he's out to play. That kind of book has already been written.

Lawrence Osborne's Hunters in the Dark is not ...

Comment

#NPRreads: Climate Scientists In The Crosshairs And China's Economy

Friday, July 17, 2015

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, ...

Comment

A Cop-Turned-Crime-Writer's Unique Portrait Of Pakistan

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Omar Shahid Hamid started off as a cop, and his decision to become one was deeply personal: When he was still in his teens, his father, a senior civil servant in Pakistan, was assassinated. "In the subsequent police investigation," he tells me via email, "I saw close up the good ...

Comment

A Vivid Portrait Of Tudor Turmoil In 'Lamentation'

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

We start with a pyre: A young woman and three men are to burn, condemned as heretics. In vivid, often graphic prose, C.J. Sansom uses this horrific scene to set the stage for Lamentation, the sixth installment of his Matthew Shardlake mysteries, set in Tudor England. It's 1546; the dying ...

Comment

'Happy' Isn't So Happy, But It Packs A Punch

Sunday, February 01, 2015

Every now and then, you find a book that's thinly plotted and has a slightly confusing, almost infuriating structure — but it's impossible to put down. The French writer Yasmina Reza has achieved exactly that with Happy are the Happy, a collection of twenty short, interconnected stories that crackle with ...

Comment

Dark, Disturbing And Playful, 'Seventh Day' Takes On Modern China

Monday, January 19, 2015

In a previous collection of short stories, Boy in The Twilight, Yu Hua describes a simpleton (some might call him dim-witted) who cannot even remember his own name: His parents are dead, he has no wife and child — nor even the prospect of any — and at one point, ...

Comment

'Recasting' India's Economic Policy For The Free Market

Saturday, November 22, 2014

It takes almost a month to get permission to start a business in India — a feature of the country's four-decade experiment with centralized, state-controlled economic planning.

India began moving away from its old policies and opening up to outside investment in the early '90s — but that movement towards ...

Comment

Answering The Old Question: Who Lost China?

Saturday, November 08, 2014

1945 was a momentous year in world history — particularly so in Asia, where Allied forces, having vanquished Germany, turned their attention to Japan. And in many ways, the main theater of action was China.

China at that time was divided between Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists and the Communists under Mao ...

Comment

Pursuing The Mafia Into All 'Four Corners' Of Palermo

Friday, October 24, 2014

Drive on highway E90 out of the Sicilian town of Palermo towards the airport and you pass a tall, orange memorial on the highway dedicated to the anti-mafia judge Giovanni Falcone; he was killed by a massive bomb blast when traveling on that highway in 1992.

Falcone and his fellow ...

Comment