appears in the following:

Rodrigo Amarante And His Great Musical Tantrum

Friday, July 16, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to musician Rodrigo Amarante about his second solo album, Drama, which he says was inspired by a personal reckoning with his own understanding of manhood.

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Local Journalist Says Erftstadt Area Has Never Seen Such Devastating Floods

Friday, July 16, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with German freelance journalist Holger Klein about the devastating flooding in Erftstadt, Germany, a town southwest of Cologne.

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'70 Over 70' Podcast Features Reflections From People Over The Age Of 70

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Max Linsky about his new podcast 70 Over 70 and his conversations with famous guests like Dionne Warwick and Norman Lear.

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The Pandemic Changed Medical Education In Potentially Lasting Ways

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Medical schools were forced to pivot to remote lectures and telemedicine visits during the pandemic. Some of those changes might be sticking for good.

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Internal Records From Killing Of Oscar Grant Show Lack Of Police Accountability

Thursday, July 08, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to KQED's Sukey Lewis about the final episode of the podcast On Our Watch, which examines recently-released internal police records of the killing of Oscar Grant in 2009.

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Police Departments Rely On A System Unequipped to Handle Racial Bias

Monday, July 05, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with KQED's Sandhya Dirks about the fourth episode of the podcast On Our Watch, which looks at how police departments are unequipped to identify and handle racist policing.

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The Uniquely American Intrugue Around UFOs

Monday, June 28, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with science and technology historian, Kate Dorsch, about why Americans seem to be especially interested in UFOs.

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How Privilege Plays A Role In America's Vaccine Hesitancy

Monday, June 28, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Junaid Nabi, health systems researcher, about what makes vaccine hesitancy such a uniquely American issue.

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Recent Polling Data Shows Why Nearly 2/3 Of Americans Oppose Cash Reparations

Friday, June 18, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Tatishe Nteta of University of Massachusetts, Amherst about his poll showing that nearly 2/3 of Americans oppose cash reparations for the descendants of enslaved people.

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Architect Of The Affordable Care Act Reacts To Supreme Court Upholding The Law

Thursday, June 17, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with an architect of the Affordable Care Act, Dr. Zeke Emanuel, about the Supreme Court upholding Obamacare once again.

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'Why Do We Have To Go Back To The Office?': Employees Are Divided About Returning

Wednesday, June 09, 2021

Americans have started to go back into the office as more of the country gets vaccinated. But not everyone wants to return to the pre-pandemic, 9-5 office lifestyle.

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Faye Schulman Used Her Camera As A Form Of Resistance Against Nazis

Thursday, June 03, 2021

Faye Schulman, a former Jewish partisan photographer captured by Nazis to document their troops, died on April 24. She was believed to be 101.

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Devastating 2nd Wave Of Coronavirus Has Changed India's Media Landscape

Tuesday, June 01, 2021

Audie Cornish talks with Manisha Pande of the Indian news outlet "Newslaundry" about how India's devastating second COVID-19 wave has changed local media's coverage of the crisis and the government.

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Japanese Band CHAI On Their New Album 'WINK' And Subverting Cultural Norms

Thursday, May 27, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with members of the Japanese band CHAI about WINK, their third studio album, and what makes them different from other female J-pop groups.

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Black Americans And The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership

Saturday, May 08, 2021

Owning a home is a part of the American dream. It's also the key to building intergenerational wealth. But Black Americans continue to face discrimination in housing, including through higher costs.

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Black Homebuyers Today Pay An Unequal Price

Friday, May 07, 2021

After the 2008 financial crisis, mortgage backers began charging more to borrowers with lower credit scores and less wealth — a practice that disproportionately affects Black homebuyers in America.

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A Window Of Opportunity: Black Flight From Compton To The Inland Empire

Thursday, May 06, 2021

Southern California's Inland Empire served as an opportunity for Black Americans to grasp the American dream of homeownership — until they were disproportionately targeted for subprime loans.

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How A Predatory Real Estate Practice Changed The Face Of Compton

Wednesday, May 05, 2021

In the 1950s, the city of Compton was nearly all-white. But by the 1970s, it had turned majority Black — in part due to a state-sanctioned predatory real estate practice called blockbusting.

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The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership: How Housing Segregation Has Persisted

Tuesday, May 04, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with writer Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor about the racist real estate practices that ensured wealth accumulated along racial lines, even after housing discrimination became illegal.

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Beneath The Santa Monica Freeway Lies The Erasure Of Sugar Hill

Tuesday, May 04, 2021

Sugar Hill was a wealthy, Black Los Angeles neighborhood whose residents played a role in lifting racially restrictive covenants — only to eventually be erased by another force of racial segregation.

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