Streams

Lisa Chow

Lisa Chow is the economics reporter at WNYC. She tries to explore in her stories surprising aspects of New York’s many economies—in plain view or hidden, in neighborhoods or sectors.

She has reported on why produce in Chinatown is so cheap, how two entrepreneurs planned to make money buying bad mortgages, and how pawnshops have capitalized on the rising price of gold. Before coming to WNYC, Lisa worked as an assistant editor at NPR’s Morning Edition program, where she booked guests, edited interviews, and reported stories for the business segment. She has also worked as a newspaper reporter in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Lisa has a bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics from Brown University and a master’s degree in law and diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University. She lives in Brooklyn.

Lisa Chow appears in the following:

3 Ways Obamacare Is Changing How A Hospital Cares For Patients

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

The Affordable Care Act is transforming more than health insurance. In hospitals around the country, the legislation could transform the way doctors and nurses actually care for patients.

Part of the law is designed to rein in the nation's exploding health care costs by creating hundreds of little experiments that ...

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Hospital Puts Docs On the Spot To Lower Costs

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Summa Akron City Hospital in Ohio is doing something unusual: sharing data with doctors on how much their patients and procedures cost the hospital.

The hospital is participating in one of the many experiments that the Affordable Care Act set into motion to help figure out how to reduce the ...

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Amazon Reviewers Debate Whether To Keep Quiet About Free Stuff

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Our story about Amazon's Vine program, which sends free stuff to some of the site's top reviewers, prompted some interesting online discussion among Vine members.

"It did feel a little ironic testing yet another set of speakers listening to the broadcast," one Vine member ...

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Top Reviewers On Amazon Get Tons Of Free Stuff

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

You're on Amazon.com. You're buying, say, a toaster, and you're checking out the customer reviews. You assume the people writing these reviews are people like you — people who wanted a toaster, went online and bought one. As it turns out, a lot of reviews on Amazon are written by ...

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Why Women (Like Me) Choose Lower-Paying Jobs

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The other day, I was interviewing an economist who studies the effect college majors have on peoples' income. He was telling me that women often make decisions that lead them to earn less than they otherwise might.

Women are overrepresented among majors that don't pay very well (psychology, art, comparative ...

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The Most (And Least) Lucrative College Majors, In 1 Graph

Monday, September 09, 2013

Erin Ford graduated from the University of Texas two years ago with a bachelor's degree in petroleum engineering. Recruiters came to campus to woo her. She got a paid summer internship, which turned into a full-time job after she graduated. Now, at age 24, she makes $110,000 a year.

Michael ...

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4 Reasons Subprime Loans Are Back (For Cars)

Friday, August 16, 2013

"I wasn't even looking for a new car," Katrece Poole told me. But two years ago, a local car dealership running a direct-mail ad campaign sent her a letter saying they were making loans to lots of buyers. So she went down to the dealership, filled out the paperwork, and ...

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Tourre Juror: 'We Saw Goldman As The Bigger Problem'

Friday, August 09, 2013

Beth Glover was a juror on the trial of former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre. When the lawyers were discussing the mortgages tied to the securities at the center of the case, Glover realized that, for all intents and purposes, they were talking about her mortgage.

"When they ...

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4 Reasons Why Millions Of Americans Are Leaving The Workforce

Friday, August 02, 2013

The unemployment rate only includes people who don't have jobs and are looking for work. A much larger swath of people — about 36 percent of U.S. adults — don't have jobs and aren't looking for work at all. That figure is higher than it's been in decades (and, conversely, ...

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What A Falling Gold Price Means For Pawn Shops

Friday, July 26, 2013

William Roman wants to borrow money, but his bank won't lend him any more. So he's turning to his local pawn shop.

For Roman, a loan from the pawn shop is a lot easier to get. He doesn't have to fill out an application. The people at the pawn shop ...

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Will Robot Nannies Save Japan's Economy?

Friday, July 19, 2013

More than half of all Japanese women quit their jobs after giving birth to their first child. That's more than double the rate in the U.S., and it's a problem for Japan's economy.

If more women returned to the workforce, it could give a huge boost to household income in ...

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Boston Beats New York City in Money Raised for Start-ups

Friday, July 22, 2011

WNYC

Boston tops New York — when it comes to venture capital funding that its start-up companies received during the first half of this year.

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Vote for Your Favorite Company Name

Thursday, July 21, 2011

As part of our coverage on the importance of choosing a name for startup companies, we've been asking for suggestions for company names based on the descriptions of three actual bus...

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How Twitter Was Nearly Called Twitch: Twitter Co-Founder Jack Dorsey on Coming Up with a Name

Monday, July 18, 2011

WNYC

One of the first things any new company has to do when it's starting is to come up with a name. WNYC's Lisa Chow and Jim Colgan interviewed company founders about how they chose their names, including Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey. Here's an extended transcript of their interview.

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Name That Company: Match the Company Name to What You Think It Does

Monday, July 18, 2011

Branding experts say a good company name should have something to do with what the company does. Although it's not always the case with successful companies (e.g. Apple), when there's little or no budget, the name often has to do the marketing. Here are some company names taken from The New York Tech Meetup, a monthly gathering in New York City where new start-ups demo their products or services. 

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Birth of a Name: What NYC Startups Can Learn From Google, Twitter & Apple

Monday, July 18, 2011

WNYC

Would Google be as successful a company had it been named Backrub? That was the name the search engine started with in 1996, and it's a question that weighs on the founders of hundreds of companies that are created in New York City every week.

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Hotel Rates Rise as More Visitors Come to the City

Friday, July 15, 2011

WNYC

New York City hotels are capitalizing on the growing number of business and leisure travelers coming to the city by raising their prices. The average daily room rate in May was $252, up nearly 9 percent from the same time a year ago, according to the hotel research firm Smith Travel Research.

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No Deal on Debt Ceiling May Mean Higher Mortgage, Loan Rates

Monday, July 11, 2011

WNYC

Rates on mortgages, car loans and certain types of student loans could rise if the White House and Congress don't come to an agreement on raising the government's debt limit.

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Analysts Expect Lackluster 2Q Bank Earnings

Monday, July 11, 2011

WNYC

Some analysts expect second quarter earnings for big banks will be disappointing because trading revenue has fallen and consumers and businesses have resisted taking out new loans, hurting bank profitability. 

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New Court Rule Drives Down Foreclosures in NYC

Monday, June 13, 2011

WNYC

Housing advocates say foreclosure actions have fallen dramatically in New York City, primarily because state courts now require loan servicers and banks to verify the accuracy of their documents in foreclosure cases.

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