Streams

Judith Kampfner

Judith Kampfner appears in the following:

The day they dropped an A-bomb on the Bronx

Wednesday, January 01, 2014

WNYC

We celebrate the end of the Cold War 25 years ago this year with Oscar Brand giving us a taste of 1950s civilian defense.

Read More

Comments [1]

In Wartime '40s, America's First Taste of Rationing

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

WNYC

During World War II, rationing became not only accepted, but a symbol of patriotism for most Americans. Listen to Oscar Brand in this never-broadcast documentary on how the government —and WNYC— helped foster that sentiment.

Read More

Comment

Holocaust Remembrance Day

Sunday, April 07, 2013

It is April 19th, 1944. Thousands of mourners silently march from a service at the Warsaw synagogue on Rivington Street to City Hall.  A few carry signs: "Save Those Jews in Poland Who Can Yet Be Saved!" and, "Three Million Polish Jews Have Been Murdered By the Nazis!"  When they arrive at the steps of City Hall, Cantor Moishe Oysher sings El Mole Rachamim, a funeral prayer for the the 40,000 Jews who died a year earlier in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising.

Read More

Comment

Still Life Sells

Friday, January 04, 2008

Home furnishings catalogs have evolved over the past couple of decades into glossy, sumptuous celebrations of domestic life (minus the mess). They're a far cry from the fuzzy line drawings of a Sears catalog at the turn of the last century. But Judith Kampfner says that some ...

Comments [2]

Mermaids

Friday, July 27, 2007

Surrealist painter Paul Delvaux painted his own beach fantasy in 1942 -- “The Village of the Mermaids.” The foreground tells one story, and in the distance there’s a surprise. Judith Kampfner went into the vaults of the Art Institute of Chicago to see Delvaux’s painting with curator ...

Comment

Silver Surfer

Friday, June 15, 2007

Spiderman, Superman ... do we really need another comic book action flick? Fans say the Silver Surfer isn’t your average superhero - he’s shinier. No one’s more excited about Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer than Judith Kampfner – she fell for him years ago.

Comment

Judith and Artemisia

Saturday, September 24, 2005

The Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi depicted the biblical story of Judith cutting off the head of Holofernes like no other artist. She painted it many times, in fact, almost obsessively. Judith Kampfner found out why.

Comment

Dancing in Bollywood Movies

Tuesday, July 05, 2005

Art house movie hits like Monsoon Wedding and Bride and Prejudice,, were intended for Western audiences. They featured some of the high energy music and dance numbers that you’d find in a pure Bollywood film. And they have spurred some New Yorkers—including WNYC’s Judith Kampfner---to explore Hindi cinema—and Bollywood dance ...

Comment

Actress Anne Bancroft Dies at 73

Wednesday, June 08, 2005

Most remembered as Mrs. Robinson, film and stage actress Anne Bancroft has died.

She won both a Tony and an Oscar for her role as Annie Sullivan, Helen Keller's teacher, in The Miracle Worker but she's best known for seducing Dustin Hoffman in The Graduate.

Bancroft, who was 73, was married to ...

Comment

British Memorial Garden

Saturday, May 14, 2005

While debate continues over what will be built at Ground Zero, work has started this week on the construction of a new Memorial park the size of a city block in the historic Wall St neighborhood. It is dedicated to the 67 British victims who died on Sept 11th. Judith ...

Comment

Party at Damaged British Consulate

Friday, May 06, 2005

There was a party last night at the British consulate on Third Avenue, just hours after the explosions yesterday morning. WNYC's Judith Kampfner reports that attendees were relaxed as they celebrated Tony Blair's winning of a historic third term as prime minister.

Although police guided guests to a side entrance, security ...

Comment

Your Truth, My Truth, The Truth

Monday, April 11, 2005

A new play at Columbia University is the latest work from British theater director Peter Brook. The work explores the life and teaching of a West African Sufi master. WNYC’s Judith Kampfner has more on the play, which is in French with English supertitles.

SOUND OF PLAY: Ta verite, ma verite, ...

Comment

New Burlesque

Sunday, March 20, 2005

A few years on into the revival of Burlesque shows, there's a community of performers who have loyal audiences in clubs and bars. Increasingly dancers and performance artists are reinterpreting the traditions of burlesque cabaret and variety. WNYC's Judith Kampfner checks into the scene and finds that it has even ...

Comment

The Flid Show

Friday, February 18, 2005

In the late fifties and early sixties, the drug Thalidomide caused birth defects in many parts of the world. Americans at the time were aware of the tragedy but the impact of thalidomide was not an issue which inspired artists. Until now. An off Broadway play called “The Flid Show”, ...

Comment

A day at the Rubin Museum of Art

Friday, January 21, 2005

Businessman Donald Rubin started buying Himalayan sacred paintings twenty years ago. Now over 900 works of art from his collection are on display in the new Rubin Museum of Art. The museum opened in Chelsea last October in a building which used to house the original Barneys store. Judith Kampfner ...

Comment

Clock Watchers

Saturday, January 08, 2005

Many writers, musicians, and artists got their start in the office — the British novelist Anthony Trollope worked for the postal service and composer Charles Ives was a full-time insurance agent. Judith Kampfner looked into the workaday lives of artists to find out how it fuels their creativity outside ...

Comment

Noguchi: Sculptor and Set Designer

Monday, December 20, 2004

The Japanese American sculptor Isamu Noguchi was born a hundred years ago. He died in 1988 and left behind a museum in Long Island City to showcase the breadth and scope of his work. He had an international reputation for large scale landscape design and corporate monuments. But the recently ...

Comment

A Number

Saturday, December 18, 2004

Kids are prone to asking questions, like “where did I come from?” These become harder to answer when you’ve cloned your son, but no one’s really sure how many of them were made. In Caryl Churchill’s new play, A Number, there are no white coats or labs, ...

Comment

A Number

Monday, December 06, 2004

When Dolly the sheep was cloned in Britain in 1999, it seemed human cloning might be right around the corner. After the media frenzy died down, British playwright Caryl Churchill decided to explore what it might be like to live as a clone. WNYC's Judith Kampfner recently took scientific experts ...

Comment

Tae Guk Gi

Thursday, September 30, 2004

Mention a movie about the Korean War to Americans and they probably think of M*A*S*H.  But while the most expensive film out of Korea is about the Korean war -its not about the experience of the US Army but the hardships of Korean fighting men and the civilian population.   For ...

Comment