Streams

Eric Whitney

Reporter, Colorado Public Radio

Eric Whitney appears in the following:

Replacing An Ambulance With A Station Wagon

Friday, September 05, 2014

There's nothing like an ambulance when you really need one, but they're expensive, and a lot of people who call an ambulance would actually be better served with a different, cheaper kind of care.

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Numbers Of Americans With Health Plans Way Up, But States Vary

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

The biggest jump since 2013 has been in states that expanded Medicaid and created insurance exchanges. Arkansas has fared best — reducing its percentage of uninsured from 22 to 12.

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What Looks Like Overcharging By Your Hospital Might Not Be

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

In 2012, Medicare was rocked by allegations that hospitals were systematically overcharging the program by miscoding electronic medical records. A study released Wednesday took another look.

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Power To The Health Data Geeks

Monday, June 16, 2014

There's a gold rush on in health information technology. Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are betting on companies that aim to help consumers, insurers and providers save money.

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How Health Insurance Exchanges Are Like Flea Markets

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

To know if taxpayers got good value in setting up the health care exchanges we need to see what happens in the next few years, economists say. Will buyers and sellers keep coming?

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High Charges By Doctors May Or May Not Be Red Flags For Fraud

Saturday, May 17, 2014

The government recently released a trove of information on how much doctors are charging Medicare. It does seem like some doctors are overcharging, but the explanation of high fees can be complicated.

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Director Bendjelloul Searched For Mysterious 'Sugar Man'

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Oscar-winning director Malik Bendjelloul died this week. He's remembered in this rebroadcast of a 2012 interview with NPR's Scott Simon.

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Colorado Redraws Insurance Map To Cut Sky-High Ski-Town Rates

Monday, May 05, 2014

The Affordable Care Act sets a lot of limits on what insurers can do. They can't charge sick people more, for instance. But one thing that still counts is location, location, location.

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Obamacare Sign-Ups Show Wide Variation By State, Ethnicity

Friday, May 02, 2014

Nearly half the 8 million people who bought health insurance through the state and federal exchanges signed up in the last six weeks. Florida enrolled 39 percent of those eligible, despite opposition.

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Rural Hospitals Weigh Independence Against Need For Computer Help

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Hospitals in out-of-the-way places are making trade-offs as they adopt electronic medical records. Some are joining larger health systems, while others are searching for ways to go it alone.

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Doctors' Billing System Stays Stuck In The 1970s For Now

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Last week Congress delayed an upgrade of codes that govern the U.S. health system. Some say this will waste millions of dollars and make cost-saving and life-saving research more difficult.

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Small Health Insurance Co-Ops Seeing Early Success

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Karl Sutton belongs to a farmers co-op in Montana where member-owners share costs and revenue. A health insurance co-op appeals to him, too — but can the model grow beyond its niche market?

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90-Day Grace Period Under New Health Law Has Insurers Flustered

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Under the Affordable Care Act, the grace period to pay a health insurance premium late has been extended to 90 days. Eric Whitney of CPR reports that this extension has insurers and doctors worried.

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Despite Setbacks, Bipartisan Support Remains For Colorado Exchange

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Colorado spent years and millions of dollars creating its own health insurance marketplace. While enrollment hasn't met expectations, the backers of the exchange still support it.

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A Love Of Medicine Runs Through Three Generations

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Bureaucracy and mammoth student loans weren't part of becoming a doctor for Michael Sawyer's father and grandfather. Still, like them, he feels medicine is a calling. A fourth generation of Sawyers is thinking about whether to carry on the tradition.

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After Fire And Floods, Colo. Town Now Faces A Hospital Crisis

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

The small tourism-dependent community of Estes Park, Colo., had a tough tourist season this year due to fires, flooding and the government shutdown. The resulting tourism decrease has also affected the town's hospital, where the cost of keeping staffing at normal levels comes at a higher cost these days.

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Sophisticated Prosthetics Help Liberate Disabled Adventurers

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

New technology is revolutionizing disabled peoples' ability to have the kind of outdoor adventures many had before losing functionality in their limbs. Amputees and people with spinal cord injuries are now off-road hand cycling, rock climbing and whitewater kayaking. Companies making innovative new gear describe cool recent innovations and challenges they're still working on. Disabled adventurers experienced and new to the scene talk about liberation through technology.

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Listeria Outbreak Still Haunts Colorado's Cantaloupe Growers

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

The contaminated fruit that killed 33 people and sickened at least 147 others in 2011 came from a farm 90 miles from Rocky Ford, Colo. But the town's many melon farmers took a huge hit nonetheless, and are still trying to convince the public their cantaloupes are safe.

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Obamacare: People With Disabilities Face Complex Choices

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

The Affordable Care Act sets up categories of essential health benefits that insurance plans must cover. Some categories, such as maternity care and drug abuse treatment, are straightforward. But "habilitative services" — including treatments like physical and speech therapy — are much more subjective.

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Doctors Heed Prescription For Computerized Records

Monday, July 15, 2013

Doctors are rushing to take advantage of federal incentives to computerize their offices. Even now, many physicians still rely on paper records for patients. While the digital approach offers some advantages, the cost and complexity of switching can be daunting.

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