Streams

Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro appears in the following:

'The Wake' Is An Unlikely Hit In An Imaginary Language

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Paul Kingsnorth self-published The Wake, his tale of the 11th-century Norman conquest of England, written in a pastiche of Old and modern English — and was startled when it became a smash hit.

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Following One Migrant's Journey Across The Sea To Europe

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

A quarter million people have crossed the sea to Greece this year. NPR follows one of them, a teacher who has left his wife and children in Syria in hopes of finding a better life for them in Europe.

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No-Fear Homemade Mayonnaise: Better Than What's In The Jar

Sunday, August 23, 2015

This week in our Do Try This At Home series: Making mayonnaise that's just as delicious as, if not better than, what comes out of the jar.

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Small Time Smuggler Helps Migrants Reach Greece On The Cheap

Thursday, August 20, 2015

NPR meets a man who helps smuggle Iraqi migrants from Turkey to Greece. The journey is dangerous, and paying the fee does not guarantee the migrants will make it to their destination.

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Boat Trip Between Bodrum And Kos Is Markedly Different For Tourists, Refugees

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

It's only a few miles between the Turkish resort town of Bodrum and the Greek island of Kos. For thousands of refugees from the Middle East and Africa, that crossing is a life-defining event.

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For Syrian Refugees Hoping To Reach Europe, Turkey Is The Jumping Off Point

Monday, August 17, 2015

The southwestern coast of Turkey has become the departure point for thousands of migrants seeking the short boat trip to a nearby Greek island, which is the first step into Western Europe.

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In London, A Bomb In The Basement Stirs Memories Of The Blitz

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Hundreds of residents were evacuated after the World War II-era bomb was discovered at a construction site. Seniors in the area were reminded of their wartime experiences as children during the Blitz.

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North Korea's Millennials Demonstrate Entrepreneurial Spirit

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

How are North Korean millennials different from the older generations? The "market generation," as millennials are called there, grew up buying and selling things — even if it was often illegal.

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For One Couple, Grub Farm Cures Stress Of Modern Korean Life

Sunday, August 09, 2015

Thousands of Koreans are giving up the urban grind for a more bucolic lifestyle, including a couple that started a larva farm. (This piece first aired on Aug. 3, 2015 on All Things Considered.)

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South Korea's Quirky Notions About Electric Fans

Sunday, August 09, 2015

Most every country has its myths. In South Korea, there's an enduring belief that if you fall asleep with an electric fan on, you're risking your life.

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Welcome To 'The Jungle,' Where Thousands Of Migrants Have Pitched Their Tents

Friday, August 07, 2015

In the French town of Calais, some migrants are trying to build a sense of normality to the sprawling unofficial camp where thousands seek shelter.

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French Port City Becomes Final Way Station For Some Migrants' Odysseys

Friday, August 07, 2015

Thousands of migrants have found themselves stranded in the French port of Calais. Most are waiting for a chance to illegally enter Britain, but others trying to create a new life in France.

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Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

Monday, August 03, 2015

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.

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In Seoul, Where Everything Moves Fast, There's Also Longing For The Past

Sunday, August 02, 2015

In recent weeks, NPR's Ari Shapiro has been reporting from Seoul. He's found South Koreans take great pride in their country's progress over the past 50 years, but it's often tempered by nostalgia.

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South Koreans Bristle At Growing Dominance Of Family-Run Conglomerates

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

A small number of family-run conglomerates dominate South Korea's economy. The biggest started as a village store in 1938. It's controlled by the same family, and is now a household name: Samsung.

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Buddhist Diet For A Clear Mind: Nuns Preserve Art Of Korean Temple Food

Thursday, July 23, 2015

In South Korea, Buddhist temple food is viewed the way spa food is in the U.S.: curative, cleansing, perhaps even medicinal. Buddhist nuns have preserved these cooking techniques for 1,600 years.

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The Story Of South Korea Told Through One Cartoonist

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

One cartoonist in Seoul has shaped and defined South Korean culture for decades. NPR meets the artist on the last day of an exhibition devoted to the scope of his career.

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Belgrade's Ruined Defense Ministry Serves As Reminder Of NATO Airstrikes

Thursday, July 09, 2015

After national trauma, some countries build memorials, and others forget. Sixteen years after bombs struck, the defense ministry in Belgrade remains a ruin, serving as a daily reminder of the NATO war against Serbia.

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London Residents Remember Subway Bombing 10 Years Ago

Tuesday, July 07, 2015

On the 10th anniversary of the worst terrorist attack on British soil, NPR hears the voices of first responders, survivors and others who lived through the London subway and bus bombing.

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The Painful Memories Of Those Who Survived London's 2005 Terror Attacks

Tuesday, July 07, 2015

On July 7, 2005, terrorists hit the subway system and buses across London. Ten years later, we hear the stories of emergency workers, survivors and those who lost loved ones.

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