Michel Martin

NPR

Michel McQueen Martin spent more than a decade covering politics and policy for the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post before she joined ABC News in September 1992; primary assignment is ABC News "Nightline"; a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Ms. Martin was graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College at Harvard University in 1980.

Michel Martin appears in the following:

U.S. Surgeon General Blames 'Pandemic Fatigue' For Recent COVID-19 Surge

Saturday, November 14, 2020

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams says people are tired and aren't taking mitigation measures as seriously as before.

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Ina Garten: 'All My Books Really Are About Comfort Food'

Saturday, October 31, 2020

Sometimes you want a really good salad, Garten says. But now is not that time. Her new book, Modern Comfort Food, is packed full of recipes for beef stew, chocolate chip cookies and Boston cream pie.

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New Book Examines How The First Amendment Sits At The Forefront In An Election Year

Saturday, October 24, 2020

Right now, we have "an entire government apparatus designed to foster falsehoods," says editor Ellis Cose, who has written a new book, The Short Life and Curious Death of Free Speech in America.

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Yahya Abdul-Mateen II On Playing Bobby Seale In 'The Trial Of The Chicago 7'

Saturday, October 24, 2020

The Emmy-award winning actor reflects on portraying the co-founder of the Black Panther Party in a new film written and directed by Aaron Sorkin about the landmark 1969 trial.

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Black Lives Matter Co-Founder On Her New Book, 'The Purpose of Power'

Saturday, October 24, 2020

Alicia Garza, a co-founder of Black Lives Matter, reflects on her past two decades of activism, the upcoming election and her new book, The Purpose of Power: How We Come Together When We Fall Apart.

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John Bolton Says U.S. Is 'Not Safer' Today Than It Was Before Trump Presidency

Saturday, October 17, 2020

Former national security adviser John Bolton says President Trump's decision-making "does not produce a coherent, effective, sustained policy."

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With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

Sunday, October 11, 2020

The model and activist, who himself is deaf, says his new Netflix reality show offers "an entrance into our world, which is so rich in culture and so layered and diverse."

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Pete Buttigieg Says There's A 'Crisis In Trust'

Saturday, October 03, 2020

Pete Buttigieg argues that Americans don't trust enough — in the government and in each other. Buttigieg talks with NPR about his book, Trust: America's Best Chance.

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A Crisis Within A Crisis: Food Insecurity And COVID-19

Sunday, September 27, 2020

Hunger is one of the most urgent — yet hidden — crises facing the nation. In this special episode of All Things Considered, a look at how food insecurity has been exacerbated by the coronavirus.

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In Affluent Maryland County, Pandemic Exacerbates Food Insecurity

Sunday, September 27, 2020

Since March, the number of people who lack a steady source of food has grown. In Montgomery County, a food assistance effort often runs out of prepared meals before it can feed everyone in need.

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Anthology Of Native Nations Poetry Is A 'Doorway,' Says Editor Joy Harjo

Saturday, September 12, 2020

When the Light of the World Was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through collects the work of more than 160 poets. "A poem opens up time, it opens up memory, it opens up place," says Harjo, U.S. Poet Laureate.

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Rina Sawayama Wants Her Success To Make Space For Asian Women In Pop Music

Sunday, July 19, 2020

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Rina Sawayama about her self-titled debut album, everyday racism against Asian women and going from a Cambridge student to a rising pop star.

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Stacey Abrams Calls Georgia's Primary Election 'An Unmitigated Disaster'

Friday, June 12, 2020

The former candidate for governor, rumored as a possible vice presidential pick for Joe Biden, told NPR: "I speak for anyone who looks like me, wants to become more, and will find themselves blocked."

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Can I Just Tell You: Covering Challenging Stories

Saturday, June 06, 2020

Host Michel Martin reflects on the pride she has in journalists covering challenging stories, especially when exposing the truth might not be popular.

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In 'Cry Havoc,' Former Charlottesville Mayor Details A Tragic Day

Saturday, June 06, 2020

"The value of having fought for things and standing at the end, having the experience of having fought for them in the real world, there's nothing like it," Michael Signer tells NPR.

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Comedian W. Kamau Bell: 'I'm Playing By My Rules' In A Moment Of Crisis

Saturday, June 06, 2020

When it comes to his role as a sociopolitical funnyman, W. Kamau Bell says "there's no break from it" as he holds dialogues about racial injustice and police violence on television and online.

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Former NAACP Head Cornell Brooks Blames Derek Chauvin For Violence At Protests

Sunday, May 31, 2020

"There would be no protests, there would be no demonstrations, had Derek Chauvin not killed George Floyd," former NAACP President Cornell Brooks tells All Things Considered.

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The Most Common Listener Questions About The Pandemic, Revisited

Friday, May 29, 2020

NPR's Michel Martin and Ari Shapiro revisit the most common questions The National Conversation has received in the last two months. And the show says goodbye, for now.

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'A Poet Is Quite Prepared For A Pandemic,' Says 'Ledger' Author Jane Hirshfield

Sunday, April 26, 2020

National Book Award finalist Jane Hirshfield helps us close the book on National Poetry Month by reading her favorite listener-submitted Twitter poems.

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Betsey Johnson Talks Fashion, Love And Motherhood In Self-Titled Memoir

Sunday, April 19, 2020

The designer who has been pushing fashion boundaries for decades reveals more about the woman behind the brand — the whimsy and fun, but also difficult times, from relationships to health challenges.

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