Michel Martin

NPR

Michel Martin appears in the following:

After 25 Years, Snow Patrol Gets More Honest Than Ever

Sunday, April 28, 2019

Award-winning Northern Irish band Snow Patrol is currently touring the United States. The group stopped by NPR to perform a few songs and chat about its latest album.

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Melinda Gates On Marriage, Parenting And Why She Made Bill Drive The Kids To School

Sunday, April 28, 2019

In her new book, The Moment Of Lift, the co-founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation calls on readers to support women everywhere as a means to lift up society.

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Police Are Investing In New Technology. 'Thin Blue Lie' Asks, 'Does It Work?'

Sunday, April 07, 2019

Technology has often been proposed as the solution to controversial policing practices. But reporter Matt Stroud says new innovations embraced by law enforcement can present their own problems.

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1st Living HIV-Positive Organ Donor Wants To Lift 'The Shroud Of HIV Related Stigma'

Saturday, April 06, 2019

Last month, surgeons at Johns Hopkins Hospital made a medical breakthrough when they transplanted a kidney from Nina Martinez, who has HIV, to an HIV-positive person.

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Fantasy Collides With African Culture In Blitz The Ambassador's 'Burial Of Kojo'

Sunday, March 31, 2019

The new Netflix movie, "The Burial of Kojo," is a fantasy film confronting illegal mining in Ghana. NPR's Michel Martin talks with the film's director about the project.

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Billie Eilish Knows What You're Afraid Of

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

At 17, Billie Eilish is music's newest misfit pop star. Eilish, along with her producer and brother, Finneas O'Connell, discuss the artist's debut album, When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

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With The Collapse Of The ISIS 'Caliphate,' A Camera Lens Lingers On Those Left Behind

Sunday, March 24, 2019

As U.S.-backed forces fought in recent weeks to reclaim the last territory held by ISIS in Syria, photographer Felipe Dana turned his lens on the thousands of civilians rushing to evacuate.

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Oakland Collective SOL Development Preserves The 'The SOL Of Black Folk'

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Members of the West Coast jazz and hip-hip group discuss SOL Development's debut album and the role music plays in community activism.

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Traditional Irish Recipes To Try This St. Patrick's Day

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Irish cuisine has more to offer than just corned beef and cabbage. Award-winning Irish Chef and food writer Darina Allen shared a few of her favorite recipes.

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At Lent, Catholics Reflect On Faith As Sex Abuse Scandal Shakes The Church

Sunday, March 10, 2019

On the first Sunday of Lent, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Sister Joan Chittister about the holiday's meaning amid the ongoing abuse scandal.

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Stella Donnelly Takes On Rock's Patriarchy With Debut Album 'Beware Of The Dogs'

Saturday, March 09, 2019

The indie rock up-and-comer from Perth, Australia, talks about her debut album, Beware of the Dogs.

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'Moonlight' Writer's Broadway Debut Stars A Queer, Black 'Choir Boy'

Tuesday, March 05, 2019

Like many teenage dramas. Tarell Alvin McCraney's play is set in a prep school. But this one, populated by African-American boys and infused with spirituals and step routines, is a specific story.

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In New Orleans, The Fight Over Blackface Renews Scrutiny Of A Mardi Gras Tradition

Sunday, March 03, 2019

Every year, African-American members of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club paint their faces black for the city's Mardi Gras celebrations. Now, they're facing calls to end the practice.

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How Christian Siriano Broke The Internet With His Inclusive Design At The Oscars

Sunday, March 03, 2019

Billy Porter of the TV series Pose wore a gender bending velvet tuxedo gown to the Oscars. "[Porter] just really wanted to wear something that made him feel really good," its designer Siriano said.

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Underdiagnosed Male Eating Disorders Are Becoming Increasingly Identified

Saturday, March 02, 2019

NPR's Michel Martin talks with journalist Soledad O'Brien about her recent reporting on eating disorders among male athletes. O'Brien said social media played a big role in these eating disorders.

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Racism In American South Inspired Gary Clark Jr.'s 'This Land'

Saturday, February 23, 2019

On his latest multigenre album, Clark is unapologetically angry. He tells NPR's Michel Martin what inspired it: "That's what came out as a result of ... life being black in this country."

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Can I Just Tell You: 'Be Prepared' To Face The Facts

Saturday, February 23, 2019

NPR's Michel Martin has two names for those following the Jussie Smollett situation: Charles Stuart and Susan Smith. Both were white people who falsely claimed they had been attacked by black men.

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Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Debuts 'Lazarus' To Celebrate 60th Anniversary

Sunday, February 17, 2019

The hour-long piece was created by choreographer Rennie Harris, who formed the first and longest running hip-hop dance touring company. Harris tells NPR's Michel Martin all about the new work.

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Facing Loss Of Accreditation Over Finances, Women's HBCU Raises Millions

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Bennett College, a historically black women's college, could lose accreditation due to financial instability. President Phyllis Worthy Dawkins tells NPR's Michel Martin how the school raised millions.

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Former Teacher Blames Education Policymakers For Atlanta Cheating Scandal

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Shani Robinson was one of 11 Atlanta teachers convicted of altering standardized test results in 2015. In None of the Above, she pleads her innocence — and points a finger at systemic failure.

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