appears in the following:

How An Author And Illustrator Adapted Nina Simone's Complicated Life Story For Kids

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with author Traci Todd and illustrator Christian Robinson about their new children's book 'NINA: A Story of Nina Simone,' and adapting a complicated figure's story for kids.

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NPR's Podcast Host Is A 2021 MacArthur Fellow

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with writer and podcast host Daniel Alarcón, who has been awarded a 2021 MacArthur Fellowship.

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How Our Brains Create Meaning From The Sounds Around Us

Monday, September 27, 2021

How do our brains create meaning from the sounds around us? That is the question at the heart of a new book from neuroscientist Nina Kraus, called Of Sound Mind.

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Plan To Widen Highway In South Carolina Would Cut Through Black And Brown Communities

Thursday, September 23, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Omar Muhammad, executive director of the Lowcountry Alliance for Model Communities, on communities in North Charleston, S.C., facing displacement for a highway project.

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U.N. Climate Conference President On 'Last Best Chance' To Combat Global Warming

Thursday, September 23, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Alok Sharma, president of the United Nations climate change conference COP 26, which is set to take place in Glasgow after being postponed a year.

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Congresswoman Bush On Her Efforts To Reinstate A Ban On Evictions During The Pandemic

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., about her ongoing efforts to expand access to emergency rental assistance funds to households at risk of eviction during the pandemic.

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More On The Investigations Into Video Game Publisher Giant Activision Blizzard

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Wall Street Journal reporter Kirsten Grind about the recent turmoil at video game company Activision Blizzard.

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Thousands of Migrants, Mostly From Haiti, Are Packed Under Texas Bridge

Friday, September 17, 2021

NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Reuters reporter Alexandra Ulmer about the conditions beneath a bridge in Del Rio, Texas and Ciudad Acuña, Mexico where thousands of migrants are waiting to claim asylum.

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More Twists In Real Life Crime Drama That Has South Carolina Riveted

Thursday, September 16, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Associated Press reporter Jeffrey Collins about a series of crimes swirling around a powerful South Carolina family.

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Infrastructure Bill Aims To Address Lead Pipes: Lessons Learned From Flint

Thursday, September 16, 2021

The infrastructure bill moving through Congress includes billions to replace lead pipes. In Flint, Mich., NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with residents on how governments can tackle a water crisis equitably.

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Oregon Sen. Wyden On How Taxing The Rich Could Fund Democrats' Priorities

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat, about crafting the Democrats' spending bill and options to raise taxes on the rich to pay for his party's priorities.

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Does Senate Testimony On Afghanistan Withdrawal Offer Clarity — Or Frustrations?

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., a member of the Armed Services Committee who heard testimony from Gen. Austin "Scott" Miller about the messy withdrawal from Afghanistan.

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Latest Apple Software Update Will Fix A Security Flaw Spyware Used To Access Devices

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Apple has fixed a flaw that allowed hackers access to device cameras, microphones and messages without users knowing — or even clicking a link.

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A Look Back At The Dark Legacy Of Abimael Guzmán

Monday, September 13, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Renzo Aroni, historian of modern Latin America, about the legacy of Abimael Guzmán, founder of the Shining Path, who died on Saturday.

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Severe Flooding Tests Detroit's Aging Infrastructure

Monday, September 13, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro visits residents in Detroit's Jefferson Chalmers neighborhood, who talk about their need for infrastructure funding to combat the growing impact of climate change on their community.

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How Surveillance Programs Developed After 9/11 — And How Those Targeted Pushed Back

Friday, September 10, 2021

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Ahmed Mohamed, legal director at the New York chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, about the surveillance of Muslim communities after 9/11.

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Los Angeles Students Over 12 Will Need To Be Vaccinated Against COVID By January

Friday, September 10, 2021

NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Megan Reilly, interim superintendent for the Los Angeles Unified School District, about the decision to require all students 12 and older to be vaccinated against COVID.

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How The Child Tax Credit Is Helping Families In Mississippi

Wednesday, September 08, 2021

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Aisha Nyandoro, CEO of Springboard to Opportunities, which works with Mississippians receiving public assistance, on the impact of the extended child tax credit.

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How Some Are Coping With Expiring Unemployment Benefits

Monday, September 06, 2021

This Labor Day, several federal programs expire which had extended unemployment benefits due to the pandemic. 7.5 million people's aid will be cut entirely and millions more will lose $300 a week.

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Director Of Texas Alliance For Life Discusses The State's New Abortion Law

Friday, September 03, 2021

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Joe Pojman, executive director of Texas Alliance for Life, about the new Texas law banning abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy.

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