Robert Krulwich

Host, Radiolab

Robert Krulwich appears in the following:

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

Monday, April 08, 2013

What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? T...
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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

Monday, April 08, 2013

Let's get dense. If we take all the atoms inside you, all roughly 70,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 of them, and squeeze away all the space inside, then, says physicist Brian Greene:

That's a very tight fit. So tight that in real life, it couldn't happen. It's not physically possible. Atoms won't crunch ...

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Monty Python's John Cleese Almost Explains Our Brains

Friday, April 05, 2013

Monty Python's John Cleese gives us a highly sophisticated, totally un-understandable, look at the human brain. The secret is, Cleese isn't speaking English. It sounds like English, b...
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Monty Python's John Cleese Almost Explains Our Brains

Friday, April 05, 2013

You've met them, I'm sure. People who are so learned, so scholarly, so deeply invested in what they're doing, that you can't understand a word they're saying — well, maybe you catch a familiar word or two, but the gist? No. They seem to be speaking a language near yours, ...

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Daring, Dangerous DIY: Pants With Benefits?

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

They call them Romance Pants, from Instructables.com, one of the world's premier do-it-yourself sites. They're for the Romantic Man who has overplanned (and overthought and overdone) ...
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Daring, Dangerous DIY: Pants With Benefits?

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

They are pants. Or maybe we should call them Pants with Benefits. Some of you — especially parents of young teens — will find them totally inappropriate. The folks at Instructables.com find them totally silly, which is why they invented them.

Randy Sarafan (author of 62 Projects to Make With ...

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Sing, Fly, Mate, Die — Here Come The Cicadas!

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

If you live in Missouri, they've already gone.

But back East, cicadas are about to climb out of their little holes in the ground, wriggle out of their skins, like this ...

... so after 17 years of getting ready, they can now do the thing they hope, hope, hope ...

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Sing, Fly, Mate, Die — Here Come The Cicadas!

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

They're not locusts. They don't eat crops, don't sting babies to death, don't even harm fruit. Yes, they make loud, screechy noises, but if you were a female cicada, you'd find the ...
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Trapped By The Web — But For How Long? Take the Kelberman Challenge

Monday, April 01, 2013

You probably know the feeling: You turn on your computer, decide to mosey around, but only for a minute or two, you have important things to do, and then — whooooosh! The computer s...
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Trapped By The Web — But For How Long? Take the Kelberman Challenge

Monday, April 01, 2013

You sit down, turn on the computer, up comes an image, could be anything, a cloud, a koala bear, a video. On the right side of the screen there are more images like it, or almost like it, so you click on one of those, just because ... because what? ...

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Creepy Critters In Sensitive Places: How Science Reporters Get Your Attention

Thursday, March 28, 2013

We're not as daring as Magellan (who died) or Columbus (who went crazy) or Henry Hudson (who froze), but in our dainty little way, we take astonishing risks. Well, maybe not astonishing. Maybe just embarrassing.

Some of the best science reporters, like the best Vaudevillians, the best circus performers, the ...

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Creepy Critters In Sensitive Places: How Science Reporters Get Your Attention

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Some of the best science reporters, like the best Vaudevillians, the best circus performers, the best teachers, are hungry for attention — not for themselves, but for a way to seize...
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Socrates (In The Form Of A 9-Year-Old) Shows Up In A Suburban Backyard In Washington

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

When he rang the doorbell, Zia hadn't planned to step inside. He was there to pick up his fiancee who was babysitting, but she couldn't leave (the parents were running late) so Zia agreed to hang out for a bit. His fiancee said, "Let me introduce you to the kids" ...

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Socrates (In The Form Of A 9-Year-Old) Shows Up In A Suburban Backyard In Washington

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

You don't expect fourth-graders to be wise. They're still boys. But one, who was playing and ruminating on his back patio, had a knack for cosmology seemingly well beyond his years.
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On Vacation

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

I'll be back with more on the blog at the end of March.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Naming Of The Shrew

Saturday, March 16, 2013

It looks kinda like a squirrel, except its ears are too small, its tail is ratty, then bushy, and its mouth? Definitely un-squirrel. More like a shrew, a fox, or a dog. And the teeth? Strange. What is it?

It's an act of edited, elegant imagination.

Drawn by science illustrator ...

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Pacific Island, Bigger Than Manhattan, Vanishes

Friday, March 15, 2013

You can see it on this Google Map — a little spit of land, sitting between Australia (on the left) and French-governed New Caledonia (on the right).

It's called "Sandy Island." In the Times Atlas of the World it's called "Sable Island." On both maps it's a conspicuous land mass, ...

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Pacific Island, Bigger Than Manhattan, Vanishes

Friday, March 15, 2013

Sandy Island, located in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Australia, occupies about about 45 square miles of the Coral Sea. It was documented in 1772 and appeared on a 1908 admira...
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Let's Get Literal: Calculating Pi With Pies. Actual Pies

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Today is March 14, or "3/14," the first three digits of Pi. It's a day celebrated around the (geek) world as "Pi Day." Pi, of course, is the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle. It was first recorded by Archimedes, but you can replicate his discovery ...

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Let's Get Literal: Calculating Pi With Pies. Actual Pies

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Today is March 14, or "3/14," the first three digits of Pi. It's a day celebrated around the (geek) world as "Pi Day." So here's the pie version of Pi, the down, dirty and baked goo...
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