Robert Krulwich

Host, Radiolab

Robert Krulwich appears in the following:

Watts For Lunch? (Or Why Humans Are Like Light Bulbs)

Monday, June 10, 2013

There's a new lunch place down the block, so like you do when the menu looks interesting, I walked in and ordered something mysterious, which for me was the "Red Lentil and Edamame Salad," mostly because I can never remember what edamame is, and because that word suggests doing something ...

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The Boomerang Graffito (Or Bad, Bad, Luther B!)

Friday, June 07, 2013

Be really careful when you carve your name onto an ancient Egyptian temple. Not because it's wrong (which it is), but because sometimes the temple comes back to haunt you. The true st...
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The Boomerang Graffito (Or Bad, Bad, Luther B!)

Friday, June 07, 2013

I was standing in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art the other day, where there's a full-sized Egyptian temple, called Dendur. It's housed under a glass roof ...

And standing there, gazing at profiles of Egyptian nobles etched onto the limestone, I noticed a bunch of what we now call ...

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MIT's Magic Bag Of Sand

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

It starts on a highway.

The camera pushes in. And there, near the meridian line, you see a faint scattering of red lights. Something is in the tar. And it's glowing.

One by one, teeny red cubes, with delicate circuitry on their sides, squeeze themselves out of the suddenly soft ...

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What Did Rachel Carson Hear? The Mystery Of The 'Fairy Bell Ringer'

Monday, June 03, 2013

This is the season of night noises, chirps, buzzes, little cries. The air is telling you, "Things are going on out here," and if you like you can step out onto the porch and do what the writer Rachel Carson did back in 1956: She played a hunting game. The ...

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TONIGHT. Live video and chat: Cellular Surgeons

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Join us for a night of nanospectucular wonders, hosted by Robert Krulwich, live from the World Science Festival tonight (May 30) at 8pm ET here on radiolab.org. Watch below, and join two Radiolab producers for a live chat as the event gets underway.

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Not Winging It, But Ringing It

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Humans do it with smoke.

Dolphins do it with air.

With a little snort, dolphins can produce a nearly perfect "air" rings, (sophisticated non-dolphins called them toroidal vortices) which they turn into underwater toys.

If they leave the rings alone, (because air is lighter than water) the underwater circles will ...

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What If There's No Internet?

Saturday, May 25, 2013

I email. I search. I shop. I Facebook. I stream. I Skype. Every year I seem to do these things a little bit more. Stroke by stroke, as I slip deeper into the Internet's embrace, I find myself wondering:

"What would happen if the Internet went away?"

Can it? It ...

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Who's The Best Drinker? Dogs? Cats? Or Pigeons?

Friday, May 24, 2013

Take a look at this.

It's a dog drinking water. It's also the answer to a riddle. When you and I take a drink, we can lift a glass, hold it to our mouth, tilt and use gravity to pour the water in. Dogs can't do that. In a pinch, ...

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How Benjamin Franklin Invented A Weight Loss Program, Using Balloons

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Ask a great inventor to invent, and that's exactly what he'll do. Sometimes the ideas pop out like cannon bursts: "consider this ... " or "maybe this?" or "Wait! How about THIS!"

Ben Franklin did that with balloons.

In the 1780s, Franklin was America's ambassador to France, living in Paris, ...

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The Little Metronome That Wouldn't

Monday, May 20, 2013

If this wasn't a science page, if this happened 3,000 years ago in, say, a Middle Eastern desert, I would call it a Miracle. But it's not. It's just a plain, ordinary moment of "wow!"

First, the beginner's version. A man takes a bunch of metronomes, sets them ticking in ...

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The Little Metronome That Wouldn't

Monday, May 20, 2013

Take a metronome. Then take another. Then another. Set them ticking at different times. Look. Lift. (That's the key part.) Watch. Then Laugh. Because you will be dumbfounded.

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David Foster Wallace Tells Us About Freedom

Saturday, May 18, 2013

What do you get when you get a college diploma? To hear David Foster Wallace tell it, you get a muscle that will help you forever after — in shopping lines, overcrowded parking lots...
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David Foster Wallace Tells Us About Freedom

Saturday, May 18, 2013

This being Commencement Time, I'd like to share this gently dramatized version of David Foster Wallace's 2005 address to the graduates of Kenyon College, in which he makes the argument that when you are dog-tired, stuck in traffic, waiting in the supermarket line, when everything is flat, dull, empty, purposeless, ...

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What Did I Do Last Summer? Oh, I Discovered How To Make Babies Without Sex. And You?

Friday, May 17, 2013

Ah, if only all summers could be like June, July and August 1740 — when three young guys (and a 6-year-old and a 3-year-old) did a science experiment that startled the world. In those days, you could do biology without a fancy diploma. More people could play.

That spring, the ...

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What Did I Do Last Summer? Oh, I Discovered How To Make Babies Without Sex. And You?

Friday, May 17, 2013

Sex is nice, but can animals make babies without it? One summer, two little boys, their tutor and the tutor's two friends did an experiment to explore this question. What they disco...
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What Is It About Bees and Hexagons?

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Bees could build flat honeycombs from just three shapes: squares, triangles or hexagons. But for some reason, bees choose hexagons. Always "perfect" hexagons. Why?

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What Is It About Bees And Hexagons?

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Solved! A bee-buzzing, honey-licking 2,000-year-old mystery that begins here, with this beehive. Look at the honeycomb in the photo and ask yourself: (I know you've been wondering this all your life, but have been too shy to ask out loud ... ) Why is every cell in this honeycomb a ...

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Astronomy's Little Secret: The Hidden Art Of 'Moonsweeping'

Saturday, May 11, 2013

A few nights ago, (Wednesday, I think, around midnight), I was by my window looking up, and there, hanging in the sky, I saw the moon. Not all of it, just what the almanac used to call "a crescent" — what my mom called a "toenail moon." The whole moon, ...

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Music, Inside Out

Friday, May 10, 2013

What would it be like to be a string that made music? Not anything simple, like a guitar string or a cello string, but a magical string, a sine curve that's taut then loose, that doubles then doubles again, that sheds then dissolves into showers of notes — a flaming, ...

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