Streams

Robert Krulwich

Host, Radiolab

Robert Krulwich is co-host of Radiolab, WNYC's Peabody Award-winning program about ‘big ideas’ now one of public radio’s most popular shows. It is carried on more than 500 radio stations and its podcasts are downloaded over 5 million times each month. He is also the author of the “Curiously Krulwich” blog, featured on National Geographic, where he illustrates hard-to-fathom concepts in science using drawings, cartoons, videos, and more. 

For 22 years, Krulwich was a science, economics, general assignment and foreign correspondent at ABC and CBS News. Krulwich has been called “the most inventive network reporter in television” by TV Guide.  His specialty is explaining complex subjects, science, technology, economics, in a style that is clear, compelling and entertaining.  On television he has explored the structure of DNA using a banana; on radio he created an Italian opera, “Ratto Interesso” to explain how the Federal Reserve regulates interest rates; he also pioneered the use of new animation on ABC’s Nightline and World News Tonight.

He has won Emmy awards for a cultural history of Barbie, the world famous doll, for a Frontline investigation of computers and privacy, a George Polk and an Emmy for a look at the Savings & Loan bailout, and the 2010 Essay Prize from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Krulwich also won the AAAS Science Journalism Award for a 2001 a NOVA Special, Cracking the Code of Life, The Extraordinary Communicator Award from the National Cancer Institute, and an Alfred I. Dupont-Columbia Award.

Krulwich earned a BA in history from Oberlin College, a law degree from Columbia University in 1974.

Shows:

Robert Krulwich appears in the following:

The Turkey Who Loved My Wife

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Radiolab's Robert Krulwich tells the story of a turkey that put the moves on his wife, and On The Media's Brooke Gladstone shows us how NOT to make dessert.

The Greene Space

A Christmas Carol: A Radio Drama

Monday, December 8, 2014

5:00 PM

Mon, Dec. 8 | Join us for our beloved holiday tradition, inspired by the Charles Dickens classic. Featuring your favorite public radio personalities and actor Mark Linn-Baker as Scrooge.

Time Flies When . . .

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

How do we perceive time? Does it move faster as we age? Slower as we fall? Co-host of Radiolab Robert Krulwich explains the science behind it all.

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Amy Sedaris Loves Family Fights at the Holidays

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Amy Sedaris offers advice on dealing with family who are drunk or confrontational at the holidays. Plus, Radiolab's Robert Krulwich on the time a turkey fell in love with his wife.

On-Demand Video: The Sporkful with Amy Sedaris, Dominique Ansel and Robert Krulwich

Friday, October 31, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful, joined us in The Greene Space for the first live taping of his WNYC podcast that explores new and better ways to eat. 

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The Greene Space

The Sporkful: Eat More Better

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

7:00 PM

Join Dan Pashman for a taping of WNYC's The Sporkful. With guests Amy SedarisRadiolab's Robert Krulwich and cronut creator Dominique Ansel.  A live video webcast will be available.

Rachel Maddow, Radiolab's Robert Krulwich and Slate's Julia Turner: Eat More Better Book Release Spectacular!

Sunday, October 12, 2014

We celebrate the release of Dan's new book, Eat More Better, by talking to MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow about cocktail philosophy and Radiolab’s Robert Krulwich about sandwich science.

Is That A Lark I Hear? A Nightingale? Surprise! It's A Bat

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

There are animals famous for their songs. Whales sing. Birds sing. We humans have Aretha, Elvis, Ray Charles, Pavarotti. But bats — who knew?
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Is That A Lark I Hear? A Nightingale? Surprise! It's a Bat

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Bats produce "pings" or "clicks," right? They make these high pitched sounds, too high for us to hear, but when their cries ricochet off distant objects, the echoes tell them there's a house over there, a tree in front of them, a moth flying over on the left. And so, ...

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2 Ways To Think About Nothing, One Mo' Time

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Let's compare two kinds of nothing: an empty patch of deep space and an empty piece of paper that was once beautiful. There's nothing to see in either. Or is there?
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2 Ways To Think About Nothing, One Mo' Time

Sunday, September 28, 2014

This being my last weekend with this blog, I wanted to repost a story I wrote a few years ago that has continued to intrigue me ...

I'm going to show you two kinds of nothing.

The first is a small patch of space, way, way out in the universe, ...

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Everything Dies, Right? But Does Everything Have To Die? Here's A Surprise

Friday, September 26, 2014

Meet two animals. Both are teeny. Both live in water. Both mature extra fast. But while one dies in about a week, the other — well, prepare to be amazed.
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Everything Dies, Right? But Does Everything Have To Die? Here's A Surprise

Friday, September 26, 2014

A puzzlement.

Why, I wonder, are both these things true? There is an animal, a wee little thing, the size of a poppy seed, that lives in lakes and rivers and eats whatever flows through it; it's called a gastrotrich. It has an extremely short life.

Hello, Goodbye, I'm ...

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This Blog Is Ending Soon

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

NPR (in the form of a super top executive) sat me down and, after four years of generously supporting this blog, told me it can't anymore. It needs to cut costs and — you know the phrase — it has chosen to go "in new directions." So at the end ...

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'Murdersquishing' Them To Death: How Little Bees Take On Enormous Hornets

Friday, September 19, 2014

They are small. They are weak. They are vulnerable. But these little bees take on a humongous predator in the most ingenious way.
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'Murdersquishing' Them To Death: How Little Bees Take On Enormous Hornets

Friday, September 19, 2014

I know, I know. You have Putin to worry about, ISIS to worry about, Britain's near breaking, Washington's broken, and the globe keeps getting warmer — so why bring up Japanese giant hornets? You have worries enough. But I can't help myself. I've got to mention these hornets because, ...

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What Makes A Star Starry? Is It Me?

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Draw a planet (a circle, right?). Now draw a star (a pointy thing, yes?). Now ask yourself, aren't stars all round? Our sun is. So why do we make them pointy? Come learn the answer.
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Howling Babies Drove Prehistoric Warriors Into Battle?

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Can a colicky baby's piercing scream be militarized? As in, made (literally) into a weapon of war? Oh, absolutely, says this scholar, smiling ever so slightly.
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Howling Babies Drove Prehistoric Warriors Into Battle?

Sunday, September 14, 2014

If you have ever seen, or spent time with (or, God forbid, had to live with) a colicky baby, this will make perfect sense to you. It may not make actual sense, but when the baby is crying you don't think very straight.

Speaking at the first BAHFest in ...

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What Makes A Star Starry? Is It Me?

Friday, September 12, 2014

Notice what Tyler Nordgren does in these posters. He's an artist, an astronomer (from Cornell, Carl Sagan's department); he's worked for NASA. He's an expert in dark matter, and a full professor at the University of Redlands. He's knows much, much more than I do about astrophysics and stars, ...

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