Noel King

Freelance Journalist based in Egypt

Noel King appears in the following:

Israeli-Palestinian Peace: Can Trump Make the Ultimate Deal?

Monday, May 22, 2017

Itamar Rabinovich, former Israeli ambassador to the U.S., explains the big issues on the table during President Trump's visit to Israel, and how he's expected to be received. 

Comment

Conflicts of Interests Cast Shadow on Trump's Trip Abroad

Monday, May 22, 2017

Donald Trump has many financial interests in Israel and Saudi Arabia — two countries he's visiting on his first trip as president overseas.

Comments [1]

Suits Accuse Insurance Companies of Making Millions by Profit-Gaming Medicare

Monday, May 22, 2017

A whistle-blower at UnitedHealth Group is claiming that big insurance companies have been using Medicare Advantage to profit-game the system in order to be paid more.

Comments [1]

Teacher Sounds the Alarm on Graduation Gap

Monday, May 22, 2017

Rob Barnett, a public school teacher in Washington, D.C., says that America is in "the midst of an epidemic of passing."

Comment

Use of Toxic Pesticide Allowed to Continue Under Trump's EPA

Monday, May 22, 2017

The EPA had decided to ban the pesticide chlorpyrifos under the Obama administration, but the agency is reversing course under President Trump. 

Comment

Trump Takes a Trip, A Foiled Terror Plot, A Teacher's Warning

Monday, May 22, 2017

On today's show: A look at the president's first international trip; white supremacy and homegrown terrorism in Kansas; one educator sounds the alarm on graduation rates. 

Comment

Foiled White Supremacist Plot Unites Community Around Immigrants

Monday, May 22, 2017

In the weeks before the 2016 election, the FBI and local officers in Kansas foiled a terrorist plot by three members of an anti-Muslim white-supremacist group called the Crusadors.

Comment

Georgetown University To Offer Slave Descendants Preferential Admissions

Friday, April 28, 2017

When Georgetown University announced they were going to try to make reparations to descendants of slaves held by the university more than a century ago, it raised tough questions for the families who stand to receive the reparations. Georgetown is offering preferential admissions to descendants, but one family with two students applying, have another idea.

Comment

Who Gains And Who's Left Out Of Georgetown's Reparations Plan

Friday, April 28, 2017

Georgetown University says it will try to atone to the descendants of slaves sold more than a century ago. One concrete step is "preferential admissions" for descendants, but it doesn't help everyone.

Comment

Episode 767: Georgetown, Louisiana, Part Two

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

In 1838, the Maryland Jesuits sold 272 people, slaves, to pay the debts of Georgetown University. We talk with the descendants about what - if anything - they're owed.

Comment

Episode 766: Georgetown, Louisiana, Part One

Friday, April 21, 2017

For the residents of a small Louisiana town, there's always been a question about their past: How'd they get there? Solving the mystery only raised more questions.

Comment

Supreme Court's Decision About Printer Cartridges Could Have Big Consequences

Thursday, April 06, 2017

A case about reselling printer cartridges has landed in front of the Supreme Court. The Court's decision could have big implications for a whole slew of consumer products, from computers to cars.

Comment

Episode 762: The Fine Print

Friday, March 31, 2017

On today's show: Snuggies, printer toner, and a banking road trip. Three stories about what happens when you actually read the fine print.

Comment

How Ben Franklin And King Louis XVI Inspired Emoluments Clause

Friday, March 10, 2017

President Trump is being sued by a group of lawyers who say he is violating the emoluments clause in the U.S. Constitution. We examine why the framers of the Constitution inserted the clause.

Comment

Federal Program Helps American Workers Who Lost Jobs To Trade Policies

Thursday, February 02, 2017

Much has been said about American workers who have lost their jobs to trade policies. But there's a little-known federal program designed to get them back in the workforce.

Comment

How A Grieving Father Created The Model For Anti-Terror Lawsuits

Thursday, January 12, 2017

After Steve Flatow's daughter was killed in a terrorist attack, he wanted justice. He embarked on a legal quest to get the right to sue a country: Iran.

Comment

Is Author Philip Roth's Book Collection What Newark Public Library Needs?

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Acclaimed author Philip Roth has chosen to donate his personal book collection to the struggling Newark Public Library. But some question whether books are what make a library relevant in 2016.

Comment

One Small Company Finds A Solution To Employee Burnout

Friday, December 09, 2016

Many companies find workplace burnout tough to tackle. But a call center in Chicago says it's found a way to keep morale up and employee turnover down.

Comment

When A Psychologist Succumbed To Stress, He Coined The Term 'Burnout'

Thursday, December 08, 2016

Between email and cell phones, many of us feel like we're at work 24/7. The concept of workplace burnout is not that old. NPR's Planet Money team has the story of the man who coined the term.

Comment

Construction Firms Consider Costs Of Trump's Border Wall

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Concrete and construction firms along the U.S.-Mexico border are already crunching the numbers on what it would take to build a thousand mile wall. It is a huge undertaking.

Comment