Streams

Noel King

Freelance Journalist based in Egypt

Noel King appears in the following:

First Take: Mideast Peace Talks, 'Failed Male' Syndrome, Global Warming Skeptic Softens

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day side, here.

We’re keeping a close eye on what’s being called a hostage situation at the Discovery building in Silver Spring, Maryland. A man with an explosive device has reportedly taken at least one hostage, local police say. We’ll have more on that as it develops.

Tomorrow we continue our coverage of Israeli-Palestinian peace talks underway in Washington with the Guardian’s Ian Black and Robert Malley of the International Crisis Group. Malley was part of the 2000 peace talks.

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First Take: Obama on Iraq and the Economy, Mid-East Peace Talks Preview, Bugs Bunny at the Symphony

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day side, with a look at what we’re following for Wednesday’s show.

President Obama this evening will give a widely-anticipated speech on the end of U.S. combat operations in Iraq. Across the country, people will be watching not only to hear what Obama says about Iraq, but what he says about the U.S. economy. We’ll give you a blow-by-blow of the speech with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met today with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. Abbass is set to meet later in the week with President Obama and Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu for the first direct peace talks in 20 months. But after decades of dashed hopes, many wonder what this round of talks might actually accomplish. Aaron David Miller is a former adviser on the Middle East to both Republican and Democratic Secretaries of State and author of “The Much Too Promised Land: America’s Elusive Search for Arab-Israeli Peace.” He’ll explain what makes this round of talks different – and what doesn’t.

New figures show that one in three American women now gives birth via C-section. That’s up fifty percent from 1996. Rachel Hutter Epstein, author of "Get Me Out," explains the somewhat surprising rise in numbers. She says it has a lot to do with doctors preferring the procedure – for several reasons. But Dr. Mitchell Maiman is one MD who doesn’t care for the caesarian. He’s chair of the OBGYN department at Staten Island University – and he’s done his best to limit the use of C-sections. He’ll explain why. We started this conversation online by asking “what’s so natural about “natural birth, anyway?” We’ll tell you tomorrow what listeners had to say.

Plus, we’ve cast an eye to Hurricane Earl as folks along the east coast batten down the hatches in advance of the Category 5 storm. And we’ll take a closer look at the 60-mile traffic jam that choked huge stretches of highway outside Beijing for nearly two weeks.

And in a follow-up to our segment on the difficulties facing cash-strapped symphony orchestras around the country, we’ll bring you a positive story: the tale of a classical show that draws sell-out crowds. Composer George Daugherty is the co-creator of “Bugs Bunny and the Symphony,” which combines classical music with beloved cartoon characters, drawing new audiences each year. 

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First Take: The Official End of US Combat Ops in Iraq, Record Numbers of Americans Rely on Gov't Assistance, Cash-Strapped Symphony Orchestras

Monday, August 30, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift, with some stories we're following for tomorrow.

Tomorrow, Tuesday, marks the end of the U.S. combat mission in Iraq. We're speaking to analysts, ordinary Iraqis and U.S. servicemen and women who were there. Noah Feldman, a professor at Harvard Law and a former senior advisor to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq says he thinks we’re in for the long haul. In an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal, Feldman draws parallels between the current political and military climate in Iraq and that of South Korea in 1953, at the end of the Korean War.

From Dr. Ziad al-Hassani in Baghdad, we'll hear about the challenges that remain for those who live in Iraq. The end of combat operations hasn't meant much for the country’s infrastructure. We’ll ask Dr. al-Hassani how work is done in hospitals with severe electricity shortages.

And we're asking U.S. sevicemen and women: What did you accomplish in Iraq? Whether it was building a school or capturing a wanted enemy combatant. John Jones, a former staff sergeant in the Marines, shares his story.  

An analysis by the AP shows that the number of families receiving welfare is greater now than ever before. One in six people depend upon government anti-poverty programs. We're looking not only at the growing numbers, but at the shifting sense of identity that accompanies being on assistance. We asked our listeners to weigh in and we've been getting responses from across the spectrum. One listener says “those federal programs are a joke. All they do is reward peoples' failures.” But another says “[federal assistance] helps me to provide for my kids since they have a deadbeat dad."

And musicians for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra have rejected contract proposals and are threatening to strike. We'll speak to Haden McKay, a cellist with the Detroit orchestra. And WNYC and WQXR classical music host Terrance McKnight says Detroit's problem mirrors those at cash-strapped symphony orchestras across the country.   

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In Pakistan, Specter of Militant Attack on Aid Workers

Friday, August 27, 2010

Pakistan's Taliban hinted on Thursday that they may attack humanitarian workers who are helping to provide relief to more than eight million people affected by catastrophic flooding. "No relief is reaching the affected people, and when the victims are not receiving help, then this horde of foreigners is not acceptable to us at all," a Taliban spokesman told the Associated Press. How do you bring aid to people in need when there are factions in the country threatening attack on those trying to help?

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US May Shift Counterterrorism Efforts to Yemen

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The US may expand counterterrorism efforts in Yemen, to address a growing threat from al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. The CIA now believes that al-Qaida's affiliate in Yemen may be more dangerous to U.S. interests than the much higher-profile group in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the aftermath of the Fort Hood shooting, the attempted Christmas Day bombing, and with names like Anwar Al-Awlaki becoming part of the everyday conversation on terrorism, more and more voices are beginning to feel that the branch of terrorists operating from Yemen, known as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, represents the largest terrorist threat to American interests and security. 


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Trapped in the Dark: Chilean Miners Live Through Nightmare Scenario

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The 33 Chilean miners still trapped underground will need to stay mentally strong - and stay physically thin. Chile's health minister says the escape tunnel being drilled for the miners will prevent the passage of anyone with a waist size bigger than 35 inches. In the meantime, soap, clothes, games and food packages are being sent down to the men.

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Arizona's Pima County Grapples with Increasing Number of Deaths Along Border's Rough Terrain

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

This year alone, law enforcement officials have recovered the remains of 170 people in the rough terrain of Pima County, Arizona. Most are believed to be illegal immigrants who were trying to make their way into the U.S. 

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Last 'Surge' Troops Head for Afghanistan

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Today, troops from the 101st Airborne Division's 4th Brigade Combat team will leave for Afghanistan from Fort Campbell in Kentucky. It's been a tough couple of months for the 101st. They've lost 41 troops in Afghanistan since March.

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Young American Muslims Offer Their Thoughts on the New York Islamic Center

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

The pitched battle over a proposed Islamic cultural center in Lower Manhattan continues to heat up. We've heard from academics and lawmakers. Today, we're asking young Muslim Americans where they come down in this debate. 

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Ramadan Relief Efforts for Pakistan Flood Victims

Monday, August 23, 2010

Devastating flooding in Pakistan continued over the weekend as the Indus River surged south and authorities raised the spectre of easily communicable waterborne diseases passing among the millions of people displaced from their homes.

The flooding is taking place during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. It's a time when, along with prayer and fasting, Muslims donate to various charities. We're taking a look at how Ramadan is being observed in Pakistan and here at home where Muslim communities are rallying to raise donations.  

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Markets Take Hit After Jobless Claims Rise

Friday, August 20, 2010

Financial markets took a hit yesterday after jobless claims rose to their highest level since last November. The jobless claims were up 12,000 from the prior week, which indicates that the claims are at 500,000. This increase is feeding concern that the economy is starting to slow down again. Louise Story tells us whether this is yet another looming sign of the feared double-dip recession. 

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A Nuclear Iran May Be Further Away than Previously Thought

Friday, August 20, 2010

It's a simple question with an infinitely complicated answer: what happens if Iran is able to build a nuclear weapon?

Russia is expected to deliver low-enriched uranium to Tehran to bring the Bushehr reactor, Iran's first nuclear power station, online. And the U.S., Israel and other nations are reportedly on alert, as hawks are calling for the bombing the reactor before the fuel is loaded into it.

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Ambassador Hans Blix on the 'End' of the War In Iraq

Thursday, August 19, 2010

The last convoy of U.S. combat troops left Iraq last night under cover of darkness. 440 troops of the 4/2 Stryker Brigade crossed into Kuwait, leaving behind another 56,000 U.S. service members in support and training roles. 6,000 are scheduled to withdraw by September 1st; another 50,000 will remain behind into 2011. 

Ambassador Hans Blix, former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, led a team of UN inspectors into Iraq before the 2003 invasion, searching for weapons of mass destruction. They found none, but the invasion went ahead as planned. 

Read a full transcript.

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Pakistan Aid Gap May Offer US an Opportunity to Restore Relations

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Pakistan’s floods are producing some mind-boggling numbers: 3.5 million children are at risk of disease, and roughly one-fifth of the country is under water. 20 million people have been displaced from their homes by the ongoing deluge.   

And some more disturbing numbers: the UN has asked for $460 million in emergency aid. To date, donor nations have only pledged 35 percent of that amount. A little less than half the donations - roughly $76 million - has come from the United States.

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First Take: Is the War in Afghanistan Worth It? The Death of the Movie Macho Man, Some Positive Economic News for a Change

Thursday, August 12, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift, with a couple of stories we’re following for tomorrow.

After taking over from Gen. Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan, Gen. David Petraeus has largely avoided the public spotlight. But on Sunday, he’s expected to begin a media blitz, starting with an appearance on Meet the Press. Reportedly, Petraeus may argue that U.S. and NATO forces need more time in Afghanistan than planned. Public support for the war is flagging, and there are deep divisions in this country over whether the U.S. should press ahead or get out of Afghanistan. We’ll speak to Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations. In an article in Newsweek, entitled, “We’re Not Winning. It’s Not Worth It,” Haass argues that Afghanistan is no longer a war of necessity, but one of choice.

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First Take: Discouraged Workers, Alaska Plane Crash, the Green Zone After the Drawdown

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

Some sad news out of Alaska: rescue crews are searching for survivors of a plane crash in southwestern part of the state. Former U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens was on board the plane and is not believed to have survived. Steve Heimel, host of Talk of Alaska, will be with us in the morning from Anchorage.

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First Take: Iraq Veterans Tell Their Stories; Job Numbers, Deflation Worries

Thursday, August 05, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day side, with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

We’re closely monitoring breaking news reports on the 14 U.S. citizens from Minnesota, California and Alabama who are expected to be charged with providing support to the Somali terrorist group al-Shabab. Details are a little sparse right now, but we’ll continue to follow this throughout the day.

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In Kurdistan: No Friends But the Mountains...and the U.S.

Thursday, August 05, 2010

All week long, we've been focusing on Iraq, where American forces are drawing down this month. We've heard mixed opinions from Iraqis and analysts who say Iraq still lacks stability, infrastructure and a functioning government. Now, we turn to Kurdistan, where the view is altogether different from the rest of Iraq. For Kurds, the U.S.-led invasion in 2003 was largely positive. For decades Kurds had suffered repression and abuse under Saddam Hussein's regime.

But what happens when the U.S. pulls out?

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First Take: The Cost of the Iraq War; Avoiding Credit Card Trickery

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

How much has the war in Iraq cost the United States? All this week, we focus on Iraq as U.S. forces draw down. We continue our coverage tomorrow with Linda Bilmes from the Harvard Kennedy School. She’ll help us untangle the hard numbers. And we’ll continue our conversations with ordinary Iraqi people. We speak to a young Iraqi teacher from Kurdistan to get her thoughts on what she’ll be teaching her students about Iraq’s past — and future.

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First Take: US Draws Down in Iraq; Retiring Later; Sitting Less

Monday, August 02, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift, with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

We’re continuing our coverage of the U.S. drawdown in Iraq. This morning, we marked the twentieth anniversary of Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait — and United States involvement in the decades that followed. Tomorrow, we’ll move the discussion up to the present for a look at what’s happening in Iraq right now. Speaking before veterans on Monday, President Obama spoke optimistically about the end of combat operations in Iraq. But according to Iraqi officials, July was the deadliest month in Iraq in more than two years. The U.S. disputes this claim. Jane Arraf of the Christian Science Monitor has been reporting from Iraq since the beginning of the war — and we’ll go to her for clarification. We’ll also speak to Lubna Naji — a 25-year-old recent graduate of Baghdad Medical School. Lubna offers her thoughts on what she expects life to be like after U.S. troops go home.

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