Streams

Noel King

Freelance Journalist based in Egypt

Noel King appears in the following:

US May Shift Counterterrorism Efforts to Yemen

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The US may expand counterterrorism efforts in Yemen, to address a growing threat from al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. The CIA now believes that al-Qaida's affiliate in Yemen may be more dangerous to U.S. interests than the much higher-profile group in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the aftermath of the Fort Hood shooting, the attempted Christmas Day bombing, and with names like Anwar Al-Awlaki becoming part of the everyday conversation on terrorism, more and more voices are beginning to feel that the branch of terrorists operating from Yemen, known as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, represents the largest terrorist threat to American interests and security. 


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Trapped in the Dark: Chilean Miners Live Through Nightmare Scenario

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The 33 Chilean miners still trapped underground will need to stay mentally strong - and stay physically thin. Chile's health minister says the escape tunnel being drilled for the miners will prevent the passage of anyone with a waist size bigger than 35 inches. In the meantime, soap, clothes, games and food packages are being sent down to the men.

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Arizona's Pima County Grapples with Increasing Number of Deaths Along Border's Rough Terrain

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

This year alone, law enforcement officials have recovered the remains of 170 people in the rough terrain of Pima County, Arizona. Most are believed to be illegal immigrants who were trying to make their way into the U.S. 

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Last 'Surge' Troops Head for Afghanistan

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Today, troops from the 101st Airborne Division's 4th Brigade Combat team will leave for Afghanistan from Fort Campbell in Kentucky. It's been a tough couple of months for the 101st. They've lost 41 troops in Afghanistan since March.

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Young American Muslims Offer Their Thoughts on the New York Islamic Center

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

The pitched battle over a proposed Islamic cultural center in Lower Manhattan continues to heat up. We've heard from academics and lawmakers. Today, we're asking young Muslim Americans where they come down in this debate. 

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Ramadan Relief Efforts for Pakistan Flood Victims

Monday, August 23, 2010

Devastating flooding in Pakistan continued over the weekend as the Indus River surged south and authorities raised the spectre of easily communicable waterborne diseases passing among the millions of people displaced from their homes.

The flooding is taking place during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. It's a time when, along with prayer and fasting, Muslims donate to various charities. We're taking a look at how Ramadan is being observed in Pakistan and here at home where Muslim communities are rallying to raise donations.  

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Markets Take Hit After Jobless Claims Rise

Friday, August 20, 2010

Financial markets took a hit yesterday after jobless claims rose to their highest level since last November. The jobless claims were up 12,000 from the prior week, which indicates that the claims are at 500,000. This increase is feeding concern that the economy is starting to slow down again. Louise Story tells us whether this is yet another looming sign of the feared double-dip recession. 

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A Nuclear Iran May Be Further Away than Previously Thought

Friday, August 20, 2010

It's a simple question with an infinitely complicated answer: what happens if Iran is able to build a nuclear weapon?

Russia is expected to deliver low-enriched uranium to Tehran to bring the Bushehr reactor, Iran's first nuclear power station, online. And the U.S., Israel and other nations are reportedly on alert, as hawks are calling for the bombing the reactor before the fuel is loaded into it.

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Ambassador Hans Blix on the 'End' of the War In Iraq

Thursday, August 19, 2010

The last convoy of U.S. combat troops left Iraq last night under cover of darkness. 440 troops of the 4/2 Stryker Brigade crossed into Kuwait, leaving behind another 56,000 U.S. service members in support and training roles. 6,000 are scheduled to withdraw by September 1st; another 50,000 will remain behind into 2011. 

Ambassador Hans Blix, former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, led a team of UN inspectors into Iraq before the 2003 invasion, searching for weapons of mass destruction. They found none, but the invasion went ahead as planned. 

Read a full transcript.

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Pakistan Aid Gap May Offer US an Opportunity to Restore Relations

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Pakistan’s floods are producing some mind-boggling numbers: 3.5 million children are at risk of disease, and roughly one-fifth of the country is under water. 20 million people have been displaced from their homes by the ongoing deluge.   

And some more disturbing numbers: the UN has asked for $460 million in emergency aid. To date, donor nations have only pledged 35 percent of that amount. A little less than half the donations - roughly $76 million - has come from the United States.

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First Take: Is the War in Afghanistan Worth It? The Death of the Movie Macho Man, Some Positive Economic News for a Change

Thursday, August 12, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift, with a couple of stories we’re following for tomorrow.

After taking over from Gen. Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan, Gen. David Petraeus has largely avoided the public spotlight. But on Sunday, he’s expected to begin a media blitz, starting with an appearance on Meet the Press. Reportedly, Petraeus may argue that U.S. and NATO forces need more time in Afghanistan than planned. Public support for the war is flagging, and there are deep divisions in this country over whether the U.S. should press ahead or get out of Afghanistan. We’ll speak to Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations. In an article in Newsweek, entitled, “We’re Not Winning. It’s Not Worth It,” Haass argues that Afghanistan is no longer a war of necessity, but one of choice.

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First Take: Discouraged Workers, Alaska Plane Crash, the Green Zone After the Drawdown

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

Some sad news out of Alaska: rescue crews are searching for survivors of a plane crash in southwestern part of the state. Former U.S. Sen. Ted Stevens was on board the plane and is not believed to have survived. Steve Heimel, host of Talk of Alaska, will be with us in the morning from Anchorage.

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First Take: Iraq Veterans Tell Their Stories; Job Numbers, Deflation Worries

Thursday, August 05, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day side, with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

We’re closely monitoring breaking news reports on the 14 U.S. citizens from Minnesota, California and Alabama who are expected to be charged with providing support to the Somali terrorist group al-Shabab. Details are a little sparse right now, but we’ll continue to follow this throughout the day.

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In Kurdistan: No Friends But the Mountains...and the U.S.

Thursday, August 05, 2010

All week long, we've been focusing on Iraq, where American forces are drawing down this month. We've heard mixed opinions from Iraqis and analysts who say Iraq still lacks stability, infrastructure and a functioning government. Now, we turn to Kurdistan, where the view is altogether different from the rest of Iraq. For Kurds, the U.S.-led invasion in 2003 was largely positive. For decades Kurds had suffered repression and abuse under Saddam Hussein's regime.

But what happens when the U.S. pulls out?

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First Take: The Cost of the Iraq War; Avoiding Credit Card Trickery

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

How much has the war in Iraq cost the United States? All this week, we focus on Iraq as U.S. forces draw down. We continue our coverage tomorrow with Linda Bilmes from the Harvard Kennedy School. She’ll help us untangle the hard numbers. And we’ll continue our conversations with ordinary Iraqi people. We speak to a young Iraqi teacher from Kurdistan to get her thoughts on what she’ll be teaching her students about Iraq’s past — and future.

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First Take: US Draws Down in Iraq; Retiring Later; Sitting Less

Monday, August 02, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift, with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

We’re continuing our coverage of the U.S. drawdown in Iraq. This morning, we marked the twentieth anniversary of Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait — and United States involvement in the decades that followed. Tomorrow, we’ll move the discussion up to the present for a look at what’s happening in Iraq right now. Speaking before veterans on Monday, President Obama spoke optimistically about the end of combat operations in Iraq. But according to Iraqi officials, July was the deadliest month in Iraq in more than two years. The U.S. disputes this claim. Jane Arraf of the Christian Science Monitor has been reporting from Iraq since the beginning of the war — and we’ll go to her for clarification. We’ll also speak to Lubna Naji — a 25-year-old recent graduate of Baghdad Medical School. Lubna offers her thoughts on what she expects life to be like after U.S. troops go home.

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What's Next for Arizona Immigration Law?

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Federal Judge Susan Bolton issued a blow to Arizona's controversial immigration law Wednesday, blocking key parts of the law, including the provision that requires immigrants to carry their papers with them at all times. We take a look at how long the injunction will stay in place and what Arizona's next legal move might be. And we ask what this means for other states that want to craft their own immigration policies. 

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First Take: Is it Wrong for Science to Link Race and Athletic Ability?; Child Poverty in the US; Senator Judd Gregg on the Deficit

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King on the day shift with some stories we’re following for tomorrow.

We begin with a topic that makes many people uncomfortable: the intersection of race and athletic ability. A research team from Duke and Howard Universities says there is a scientific explanation (based on center of gravity and locomotive physics) for why people of West African descent excel at running while people of European descent excel at swimming.

We’ll talk with Howard University’s Edward Jones, one of the scientists behind the study. We ask Jones how these studies fit into a world in which race is increasingly viewed as a social construct. And Latoya Peterson of Racialicious.com explains why studies like this one make so many people squeamish. Is it racist to draw this kind of conclusion?

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First Take: WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange, Death Along the Arizona Border, BP Quarterly Earnings and Suggestions for a New CEO

Monday, July 26, 2010

PRI
WNYC

Noel King, on the day shift, with some stories we're following today.

This morning on The Takeaway we spoke to New York Times reporters Jane Perlez and Eric Schmitt, who reported on the release of more than 90,000 classified military documents by the website Wikileaks.org. Tomorrow, we speak to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange— a man whom some consider a hero and others call a villain.

BP quarterly earnings are due out tomorrow. Bloomberg’s Alice Schroeder tells us what to expect. Meanwhile, Tony Hayward might soon get his life back. Robert Dudley, an American, is expected to replace Hayward as CEO of BP. We’re asking some of our regular guests from the Gulf region to weigh in on what they would like a new CEO to do first.

Arizona’s immigration law SB 1070 is set to take effect on Thursday and we’re asking how residents—documented and undocumented—are preparing. We’re digging into a report out of Pima County that some immigrants are returning home, and that increased security and high temperatures are leading to more and more deaths along the border.

Greg Mortenson, author of "Three Cups of Tea," joins us to talk about how his book became a must-read at the Pentagon. Mortenson’s Central Asia Institute has built over 100 schools for girls in Afghanistan and Pakistan. He weighs in on the way forward in the region.

And a slice of life from Houston: Reporter Melissa Galvez hit the streets to ask city residents if the Gulf spill is changing the way they think about energy consumption. The answer may surprise you.

Plus, author Gary Shteyngart on his new book “Super Sad True Love Story,” and seventy years of Bugs Bunny.

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Congress Approves Legislation to Extend Unemployment Benefits

Friday, July 23, 2010

This week, Democrats in Congress broke a Republican filibuster and passed legislation to extend unemployment benefits. 2.5 million unemployed people will get payments retroactive to the time they stopped receiving benefits. One of those is Michelle Ives, who got her last check in June, and has resorted to desperate measures while she waited for her check (including taking out a 35 percent loan on her car).

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