Streams

Mythili Rao

Associate Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Latin America's New Middle Class

Monday, December 03, 2012

There is a middle class emerging in Latin America — far south of the white picket fences and the syndicated episodes of "Leave It To Beaver." But who is this middle class? What do they want? And what will this group mean for the world market? Answering these questions, and more, are Christopher Sabatini, editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly, and Jamele Rigolini, senior economist at the World Bank.

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'Triumphs of Experience': Studying the Happy Life

Friday, November 30, 2012

Between 1939 and 1944, more than 200 Harvard students – all "physically and mentally healthy" men – were recruited to participate in a study. The 200-some odd students had the privilege of being tracked by Harvard Medical School for the rest of their lives. Dr. George Vaillaint, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of "Triumphs of Experience" has been overseeing the study since his early 30s. He set out to discover what predicts a happy life.

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From the Heart: Five Novelists on Writing About Love

Friday, November 30, 2012

At the Miami Book Fair International, five novelists sat down to talk about love: why it’s so appealing to read about, so hard to write about, and why we can’t get enough of it. It's the final part of our Love and Death series.

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The Final Chapter: Five Authors Discuss Writing About Death

Thursday, November 29, 2012

At the Miami Book Fair International, five authors of memoirs gathered to discuss their brushes with death. One of them, Benjamin Busch, author of "Dust to Dust," recounted facing death in Iraq — and then returning home from war to his own parents' deaths.

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Fiction or Non-Fiction? A Veteran Journalist Explains Why He Ventured into Fiction

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Yesterday's segment about new curriculum guidelines that would replace some beloved novels with non-fiction reading in K-12 classrooms sparked a lot of responses listener responses about the virtues of fiction and non-fiction. What's more important for a high school education: fiction reading or non-fiction reading?

Today, a veteran journalist who ventured into fiction after a storied career in the world of non-fiction weighs in. Jeff Greenfield is the author of "Then Everything Changed."

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Listeners Respond: Memorable High School Reads

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Sometimes, high school reading assignments make a lasting impression. Listeners from across the country called to describe the books they're still thinking years after high school. At the top of the list were Herman Hesse's "Soddhartha" and the novels of George Orwell and Toni Morrison. But listeners also remembered being inspired and moved by books that opened their eyes to poetry, history, and science.

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The Blank Slate of American Identity in Emma Donoghue's 'Astray'

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

They’re the forgotten minor characters of history: A Texas slave who kills his master and runs away with the master’s wife. An elephant trainer heartbroken at the sale of his best friend to P.T. Barnum. The stars of these obscure news brief items — and many more — come to life in "Astray," a new collection of short stories by Emma Donoghue.

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How Haitians Deal With a Constant Stream of Disaster

Monday, November 26, 2012

Haitians are somewhat more practiced in dealing with the calamity of natural disaster. At the Miami Book Fair International, writer Edwidge Danticat, whose work most recently appears in a trilingual (English, French, Creole) anthology, “So Spoke the Earth,” sat down to explain how Haitians approach natural disaster.

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How John Manrique Is Getting Better

Friday, November 23, 2012

After the show reported on some disturbing trends in obesity in the United States, people were quick to respond. Listener John Manrique details his own story about how he lost over seventy pounds three years ago and kept it off.

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Consider the Fork: A Food Writer's Cultural History

Thursday, November 22, 2012

In honor of Thanksgiving, Bee Wilson asks us to "Consider the Fork." Wilson is the author of a book by the same title, and she explains how our relationship with food is emotional, primal, familial, and cultural.

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Adam Gopnik on the Meaning of Food

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Food is on all of our minds today, but how often do we really think about food? For Adam Gopnik, the answer is always. His latest book is "The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food." 

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Fallout From Miami Marlins Deal Continues

Friday, November 16, 2012

It's been a tough week for fans of the Miami Marlins baseball team, thanks to a series of disappointing trades and business decisions. Phil Latzman, reporter for WLRN and The Miami Herald provides an update.

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Miami Musicians Raise Funds for Haiti

Friday, November 16, 2012

In the past two years, Haiti relief has been the focus of Julliard-educated musician Romel Joseph.  After Joseph was trapped in the rubble of his music school, The New Victoria, he pledged to rebuild his school and raise funds for his ravaged home country. Victoria and Bradley Joseph, Romel’s daughter and son, both musicians with Friends of Music Education for Haiti, explain what they hope to accomplish.

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Adam Gopnik on the Meaning of Food

Friday, November 16, 2012

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, food is on most of our minds. But for Adam Gopnik, author and staff writer for The New Yorker, this is nothing out of the ordinary. In his most recent book, The Table Comes First, Gopnik explores the meaning of food — in culture, in family, and in society.

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Checking in After Hurricane Sandy

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Hurricane Sandy affected millions of people on the East Coast, hitting New York and New Jersey especially hard. The storm hit home for us here at The Takeaway. Our senior producer, Jen Poyant, lives in Arverne, Queens near the Rockaways, one of the hardest hit parts of New York City.

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What Does Legal Marijuana Mean for Washington and Colorado?

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

The legalization of recreational marijuana use in Washington and Colorado has raised a number of big questions about the social, legal, and economic implications. What are people saying on the ground in these states? And how has this change already altered attitudes toward marijuana? Dominic Holden a newsweekly editor in Seattle, and Bonnie Dahl, a head ship owner, explain.

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Marijuana Ballot Initiatives In Washington and Colorado Raise Legal Questions

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Newly passed ballot initiatives in Colorado and Washington decriminalize the use of recreational marijuana — and raise a host of complicated legal questions. Kevin Sabet, former senior adviser to the director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, explains some of the conflicts the new legislation poses.

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Pick of CEO at New York Times Raises Questions

Monday, November 12, 2012

The New York Times debuted their new CEO recently. The addition of Mark Thompson has raised questions however because of a a scandal that emerged out of the BBC. Times columnist Joe Nocera gives us an update from inside the paper.

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Fractured and Criticized Syrian Opposition Attempts to Reorganize

Friday, November 09, 2012

Syrian opposition leaders have been meeting this week to tap new leadership after Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton pronounced the Syrian National Council a failure last month. Amr Al-Azm, member of the Syrian opposition and a professor at Shawnee State University, explains what's at stake for the opposition at this juncture.

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The World Has Their Say About the 2012 Election

Thursday, November 08, 2012

In 2008, the election of Barack Obama was a historic moment not only in the United States, but around the world. A year after he was elected, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. On term later, how does the world feel? Ros Atkins, the host of the BBC's World Have Your Say, has a unique sense of the world's opinions.

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