Streams

Mythili Rao

Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Lessons From the 2003 Northeast Blackout

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

In 2003, a great blackout left nearly 50 million Americans from Ohio to New York without electricity. This week, more than 200 public and private large power companies are staging a mock-blackout. They won’t turn any lights out. But they will rehearse how they would respond in the event of another major outage. Jonathan Gruber, Retro Report Director takes a look back at the lessons of 2003's outage.

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In India, Changing Mindsets to Empower Women

Thursday, November 07, 2013

A woman in India is raped every 20 minutes, according to the National Crime Records Bureau in India. One organization is trying to change those numbers.  Jameela Nishat runs the Shaheen Resource Center for Women in Hyderabad's Old City. Her organization attempts to aid and empower women—particularly those in Muslim and Dalit communities—to reclaim their lives.  

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Analyzing Ballot Measure Votes Around the Country

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Election Day has come and gone, and in addition to choosing mayors and governors, six states took up a total of 31 ballot measures. From Colorado to New Jersey and beyond, citizens weighed in on everything from the minimum wage, marijuana and genetically modified food. Joining The Takeaway to discuss these initiatives is Wendy Underhill, program manager at the National Conference of State Legislatures.

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What Elections in New Jersey & Virginia Say About National Politics

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Around the country, voters headed back to the polls yesterday to cast ballots in mayor and gubernatorial contests and to vote on a host of ballot initiatives. Anna Sale, a reporter for WNYC, has been covering races in New York City and neighboring New Jersey. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent has been following the Virginia gubernatorial race.

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Can Data-Tracking Devices Help Kids Stay Active?

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Can data and algorithms help motivate kids to be more active? That’s the goal of a new project being pioneered in Snohomish County, Washington. Dr. Gary Goldbaum, health officer and director for the Snohomish Health District explains what the program hopes to achieve. Ben Waber, CEO of Sociometric Solutions and author of “People Analytics: How Social Sensing Technology Will Transform Business” talks about the broader implications of these kinds of practices. 

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Exploring 'The Power of Glamour'

Monday, November 04, 2013

What is glamour? Is it a $900 red dress, the curve of a leg emerging from that dress, or the way a woman in the red dress carries herself as she walks into the night? Virginia Postrel, author of “The Power of Glamour,” explores these and other questions in her new book on the topic.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson On How Much We Don't Know About Our Universe

Monday, November 04, 2013

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist and Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.  He's also the narrator "Dark Universe," a new show about the stuff our cosmos are made of: dark matter.

 

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Report: NSA's MUSCULAR program taps Yahoo, Google data centers

Thursday, October 31, 2013

The latest revelations from NSA leaker Edwards Snowden about the agency's surveillance practices involve a program called MUSCULAR. By tapping into the data centers that connect Yahoo and Google to users around the world, the program gave the NSA secret access to millions of digital records about who sent or received emails and when. Stewart Baker, former general counsel to the NSA, says that American citizens should be relieved by how closely the agency is tracking potential threats in order to maintain security.

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Listeners Respond: Your Favorite Scary Halloween Stories

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Takeaway listeners share scary Halloween stories from their childhood, and  R.L. Stine, the author of several scary series for children, including  "Goosebumps," describes one particularly frightful Halloween from his childhood. What's your scary Halloween story? Leave a comment, give us a call at 1-877-869-8253, or record your own message using your computer right here.

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Rep. Alan Grayson: Congress Doesn't Trust the NSA

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

President Obama wasn't aware of many of the NSA's surveillance activities, like the one that monitored German Chancellor Angela Merkel, according to the The Washington PostRep. Alan Grayson, Democrat from Florida’s 9th district, argues that he and his colleagues are kept in the dark by the intelligence community, as well. He says that as a result, America's democracy is at risk.

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Tribal America and Moral Decision-Making

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Joshua Greene, author of “Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap between Us and Them,” joins The Takeaway to discuss how our collective groupings affect the moral decisions we make.

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Britain Seeks to Prevent The Publishing of Snowden's Leaks

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

British Prime Minister David Cameron appears ready to crack down on The Guardian, the news organization at the center of the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's leaks. Louise Mensch is a former conservative member of Parliament. She's called for the government to crack down on The Guardian from the beginning. She explains her stance against The Guardian, and how she hopes the Snowden saga will finally end. 

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Syria Moves Closer to Destroying Chemical Weapons Stockpile

Monday, October 28, 2013

Three days ahead of its deadline, the Syrian regime submitted a formal declaration of its chemical weapons arsenal and its plans for destroying that stockpile. Is this a sign that change is possible in Syria? Robin Wright, a joint fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson International Center, weighs in. She's the author of "Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World."

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Retro Report: Hurricane Katrina and Its Aftermath

Monday, October 28, 2013

This week, as we mark a year after Hurricane Sandy hit the Eastern Seaboard, our friends at the documentary team Retro Report are looking back at another major storm, and the lessons from its recovery. When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in August 2005, it caught the state of Louisiana complete off-guard. James Perry, director of the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, examines the lessons from Hurricane Katrina.

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President Obama Apologizes to French and German Leaders Over Surveillance Concerns

Thursday, October 24, 2013

After German Chancellor Angela Merkel received intelligence from her government that her phone was under surveillance, President Obama called Chancellor Merkel and reassured her that her phone was not being tapped. That conversation came just a few days after he had to offer similar reassurances to French President François Hollande. David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for our partner The New York Times, joins the Takeaway to discuss this latest diplomatic riff.

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Retro Report: The True Story Behind the Spilled McDonald's Coffee Lawsuit

Monday, October 21, 2013

The Takeaway travels back in time with our friends at Retro Report, a documentary team focused on shedding new light on stories from the news archives. Today’s report takes us back to 1992 when 79-year-old Stella Liebeck of Albuquerque, New Mexico, ordered a fateful cup of coffee from a McDonald's drive-through. Lieback's coffee spilled onto her lap, and she sued the fast food chain. Retro Report producer Bonnie Bertram reflects on the case, and explains the details of her investigations.

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Former Treasury Secretary Michael Blumenthal on Shutdown Aftermath

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Congress still has to reach a long-term plan for taxing and spending policies, and once again come to an agreement on raising the debt ceiling in 2014. Otherwise, the Treasury Department will be unable to pay its bills. W. Michael Blumenthal, former Treasury Secretary and author of the new memoir, “From Exile to Washington: A Memoir of Leadership in the Twentieth Century,” reflects on the nation's fiscal climate and his own time in office.

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The Latest Cutting-Edge "Stuff" in Science & Technology Innovation

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

David Pogue hosts the NOVA series "Making Stuff," which begins tonight at 9 PM Eastern on PBS with the episode “Making Stuff: Faster.” Other episodes in the series, produced by our partner WGBH, include "Making Stuff: Wilder," "Making Stuff: Colder," and "Making Stuff: Safer." Pogue, a tech columnist for our partner The New York Times, joins The Takeaway to discuss the latest cutting-edge "stuff" in science and technology innovation.

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President Taft's Surprisingly Modern Diet Struggle

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Newly unearthed letters and diaries of President William Howard Taft show that the famously "corpulent" president pursued several modern dieting techniques, including keeping a food diary and seeking the council of a "physical culture man"—his year's version of a personal trainer. Dr. Deborah Levine, assistant professor of health policy and management at Providence College, discusses her findings about President Taft.

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Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature

Thursday, October 10, 2013

On Thursday morning, the Swedish Academy named Canadian Alice Munro as the winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. Not a stylist nor a writer of experimental fiction, Munro is a self described old fashioned storyteller. Her disciples and fellow writers describe her as creating small worlds that convey addictive wisdom. Radhika Jones, executive editor at TIME magazine, explains the significance of this choice.

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