Streams

Mythili Rao

Associate Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

CIA Secretly Steering Arms to Syrian Rebels, New Report Claims

Thursday, June 21, 2012

News reports claim that British and US leaders are prepared to offer Syrian President Bashar al-Assad clemency if he agrees to help push for a UN-sponsored conference on political transition in Syria. This could put an end to the violence, but would no doubt spell a bittersweet end for many Syrians who want to see al-Assad answer for his actions.

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State Rep Banned from Speaking after Use of the "V Word"

Monday, June 18, 2012

"I'm flattered that you're all so interested in my vagina, but no means no." That's what Michigan State Representative Lisa Brown told her fellow lawmakers on the floor of the State House during a debate on abortion rights and the "V word" apparently made a few nervous enough to ban Ms. Brown from speaking on on the floor of the house.

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Syria Arm Sales Cools Russia US Relations

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Earlier this week, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton accused Russia of providing helicopters to assist the Assad regime. Is Putin fighting the last battle of the Cold War in Syria?

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Peacekeeper Calls Syria Conflict "Civil War"

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

The conflict in Syria is escalating so rapidly and involving such sectarian violence that one U.N. peacekeeper has called it a "civil war." What does identifying the conflict as a "civil war" mean going forward?

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The Costs of Retiring Early

Monday, June 11, 2012

Grappling with months or even years of unemployment, some older Americans are tapping into the one safety net that's meant not to be tapped into: social security. Motoko Rich, national economics reporter for our partner The New York Times, recently profiled 62-year-old Palm Springs resident Clare Keany. Clare lost her job in 2008 and never found a full-time replacement. 

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Google Search Patterns Betray Racism, Voting Tendencies

Monday, June 11, 2012

In barely a decade and a half, Google has become an extension of our brains: with mobile devices and computers we can have the answer to a question before we complete a sentence. Google searches are a prosthetic memory, but they also may constitute an MRI of our collective personality – especially some of it's more disturbing aspects. The research of Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, doctoral candidate in economics at Harvard, focused on voting patterns and racial prejudice in Google searches.

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New Movie Releases: 'Prometheus', 'Madagascar 3'

Friday, June 08, 2012

This week’s big release is “Prometheus,” starring Michael Fassbender and Charlize Theron. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, hosts this week's Movie Date.

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Follow Friday with Dan Damon and Farai Chideya

Friday, June 08, 2012

Our Follow Friday panel, journalist Farai Chideya and BBC World Update host Dan Damon, discusses the top stories of the past week, including the European debt crisis, Diamond Jubilee, White House leaks, Clinton gaffe, and the death of Ray Bradbury.

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Unemployment Falls in Auto Industry Swing States

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

Did the auto industry bailout work? New numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggest it did, with unemployment rates dropping faster than the national average, due in part to jobs created by the auto industry. This could be the push President Obama needs to stay on top until November, but as the rest of the country continues to struggle, it might not be time to raise the victory flag quite yet.

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Why The American Middle-Class Needs Unions

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

Last night in Wisconsin, voters weighed in on whether Governor Scott Walker would stay in office. The recall began with protests over Governor Walker's attempts to curb union bargaining power in Wisconsin. However, as the election approached it grew into a divisive political fight, with $60 million on both sides. Whether or not the Wisconsin recall will prove to be a bellweather for the 2012 presidential election, it's certain to have implications for the future of labor unions throughout the country.

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Mubarak Sentenced to Life In Prison, Egyptians Take to the Streets Once More

Monday, June 04, 2012

When Hosni Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison on Saturday, some Egyptians rejoiced. But many felt the verdict didn’t go far enough, and took to the streets. On Sunday, Egypt's state prosecutor office said it would appeal the sentences and push once again for the death penalty. Michael Wahid Hanna researches Middle East policy for the Century Foundation in New York.

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After Mistrial, An Emotional Edwards Faces the Future

Friday, June 01, 2012

It was the political trial of the decade, starring a hidden child born to a secret, high-octane mistress; an ambitious first lady battling cancer; a loyal daughter watching in the wings; and an emotionally volatile campaign aide condemning his old boss.

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Is the Recession Redefining American Masculinity?

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Economists consider workers between 25 and 54 to be in their prime, and fewer of them are working than at any point since 1948. That means America’s workforce is going through a dramatic shift. And so is the definition of the family breadwinner.

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Presidential Leadership and the Origins of the "Kill List"

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

The "Kill List": It's the President's shifting roster of names of high-profile targets. If you're a suspected terrorist, it could be the last list your name appears on before the US government ends your life. The Obama administration appears to be the first presidential administration to keep such a list.  What does the president's hands-on role in monitoring this list says about his leadership style?

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Gearing Up for General Election, Romney and Obama Race to Define Their Campaigns

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Right now, we’re at the crucial phase in the general election season where both leading candidates for president are looking to define themselves and the presidential race before their opponent does it for them. So where do we stand on presidential campaign definitions? Molly Ball, staff writer for The Atlantic, and Ron Christie, Takeaway contributor and Republican strategist, break it down.

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Mae Jemison's Quest to Take us All into Space

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Few on our planet know what it might take to launch civilians into space, and Mae Jemison is one of them. Jemison famously became the first black woman to travel in space when she boarded the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Today, she’s helped found the Dorothy Jemison Foundation, an organization dedicated to creating a space program for civilians within the next 100 years. 

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Massacre Near Homs Puts Pressure on US Role in Syria

Monday, May 28, 2012

The UN Security Council held an emergency meeting yesterday to discuss a massacre that took place over the weekend in the Syrian town of Houla. The Syrian government insists that its tanks and artillery were not responsible for attacks that killed at least 90 villagers – including 32 children – but monitors who visited the village after the attacks said they found evidence that the Syrian military fired on civilians. Amr Al Azm, member of the Syrian opposition and professor of history and anthropology at Shawnee State University and Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, react to the latest news from Syria.

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Skee-Ball Stars Vie for Championship

Friday, May 25, 2012

While athletes from around the world gear up for the summer Olympics, competitors of another sort have been polishing their moves for the national Skee-Ball championship. This weekend in Brooklyn, 64 of the country’s best skee-ball rollers face off at the Brewskee-Ball National Championship, a weekend-long festival of beer, bands, foods and skeeball. Eric Pavony, Skee-E-O and founder of Brewskee-Ball, the first ever national Skee-Ball League explains what the competition will entail.

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How Do Banking Regulations Get Written?

Friday, May 25, 2012

Earlier this month, JPMorgan disclosed that it lost at least $3 billion in trading as a result of sheer mismanagement. The news ignited a fresh debate on financial regulation – specifically on the Volcker rule, a measure Dimon had vocally opposed. Yet it's not certain the final Volcker rule would prohibit the kind of trades that led to JP Morgan's losses. So how are banking regulations written in the first place?

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Follow Friday: Facebook, JPMorgan, Layoffs, Attack Ads, and Fair Punishment

Friday, May 25, 2012

Our panel of social, political and pop-cultural experts to tell us about the stories you may have missed this week.

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