Streams

Mythili Rao

Associate Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Fire and Forget: New Stories for New Wars

Friday, March 15, 2013

The legacy of war literature is a rich one. When Matt Gallagher returned from the Iraq War, he discovered he needed to write his own stories. He is co-editor of "Fire and Forget," a new collection of short stories by Iraq and Afghan war veterans, and their family members, on the experience of modern warfare.

Comments [3]

North Korea Ups the Ante

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Is it time to start to take North Korea more seriously? Karin Lee, executive director of the National Committee on North Korea, weighs in.

Comments [1]

Fracking's Impact on the American Landscape

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Fracking has worked miracles in the west, but are we back to a form of wildcatting for oil and gas — a boom time with no rules? Richard Manning, a writer based in Montana has been reporting on the impact of accelerated efforts to bring oil and gas out from the shale rock formations in Bakken, North Dakota.

Comments [3]

Your Stories: Lessons from the Iraq War

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Ten years ago this month, the US invaded Iraq, launching the Iraq War. Throughout the week, we're looking at lessons from the war from scholars, soldiers, translators — and you.

Comments [2]

Can a Math Museum Remedy 'Math Anxiety'?

Thursday, March 07, 2013

It may not surprise you to learn that American students dread math. But it might surprise you to learn just how young students are when math anxiety kicks in. New research from New York University suggests students start fearing math as early as first grade.  Dr. Rose Vukovic is a professor of teaching and learning at NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development where she's studying this problem.

 

Comments [13]

President Obama Pushes to Diversify Judiciary

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

In the past several months, President Obama has been making a quiet push to change the face of the nation's judicial system with a slow and steady stream of diverse nominees for federal courts.  In Florida, he's nominated the first openly gay black man to serve on federal district court.  In New York, he nominated the first Asian American lesbian. And in DC, he's nominated the first South Asian to sit on the US Court of Appeals.  Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund explains what hurdles these candidates may face and what potential these nominations represent.

Comments [2]

Chavez's Death Leaves A Divided Venezuela

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Hugo Chavez, Venezuela’s deeply polarizing president, died Tuesday.  He was 58. His death leaves open questions about the future of the country-- and about the real impact of his legacy. Hannah Strange is Latin American Correspondent for the London Times; Phil Gunson is a Caracas based freelance journalist, who writes for The Economist; and Elio Aponte is founder of the Organizacion de Venezolanos en Exilo.

Comments [2]

How Public Bonds End Up Financing Wineries, Golf Courses, and More

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

They’re called “qualified private activity bonds,” and they’re intended to encourage public works through a tax break. In reality, though, they often go to subsidize private projects—everything from a winery in North Carolina to a golf resort in Puerto Rico to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and the offices of Goldman Sachs in New York.  Louise Story, investigative reporter for The New York Times explains how this loophole gets used.

Comments [1]

Wendell Pierce of 'The Wire' and 'Treme' Hopes Groceries Can Revitalize New Orleans

Monday, March 04, 2013

Wendell Pierce, best known for his role as Bunk in the HBO series "The Wire," is starting a chain of grocery stores in New Orleans as a means of revitalizing the city.

Comments [1]

The Desire to Be Hip Is Making All Our Cities the Same

Monday, March 04, 2013

Cities like New Orleans and Pittsburgh have benefited from major economic investments and new business models. But writer Chuck Thompson thinks this isn't always a good thing. He's the author of "Better Off Without 'Em." His latest article in The New Republic is called "Take this Microbrew and Shove It."

Comments [5]

The Changing Face of the South

Monday, March 04, 2013

In her new book, "The New Mind of the South," author Tracy Thompson explains how she felt compelled to return to her Southern upbringing to piece back together the history she learned through a prism of segregation in the post-Jim Crow era South.

Comments [2]

Lessons in Revitalizing Cities

Monday, March 04, 2013

With Detroit falling deeper into debt and the local government helpless to respond, governor Rick Snyder declared a financial emergency in the city on Friday. The next step is to appoint an emergency manager who will be tasked with turning Motown around.

Comments [2]

Diet Advice Abounds, But Are We Getting Healthier?

Friday, March 01, 2013

Even if you're relatively secure about your health and waistline, it's been impossible to completely miss the buzz around the major diet trends of recent years. But is all this nutrition advice actually making us healthier?

Comments [11]

Cold War Musical Envoy and Piano Legend Van Cliburn Dies at 78

Thursday, February 28, 2013

It was 1958. In the midst of the Cold War, the inaugural Tchaikovsky International Competition took place in Moscow. Amid a climate of fear and mutual suspicion between Americans and Russians, a 23-year-old Texan named Van Cliburn performed a breath-taking rendition of Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto.

Comments [2]

The Secret Process of Picking a Pope

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Pope Benedict the sixteenth gives up the papacy today, leaving the world's 1.1 billion Catholics without a religious leader. How will the next one be chosen?

Comments [1]

Lessons from the Civil Rights Movement About 'Failing Up'

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Supreme Court fight over the Voting Rights Act of 1965 is just the latest struggle in a battle over civil rights that stretches back more than a century in this country. It's a struggle marked with many victories, big and small — and many failures along the way, too.

Comment

The Fight to Bring High-Speed Internet to Rural America

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Federal stimulus programs have poured more than $7 billion into reaching rural areas, but at least 19 million Americans still lack high-speed internet access. One of those communities still trying to get reliable broadband access is Silverton, Colorado.

Comments [6]

Malian Musician Fatoumata Diawara Gives Voice to Women in Debut Album

Monday, February 25, 2013

In the West, music can offer the chance to escape and liberate oneself from the present troubles of life. But in Mali, Islamic extremists have been cracking down on music and the country's rich traditions and history associated with musical freedoms.

Comments [3]

Forget Organ Donation, Scientists Are Now Printing Body Parts

Monday, February 25, 2013

3D printing is a dynamic new technology that promises to revolutionize how we manufacture and create things. Still in its early stages of development, it’s already being used to make chocolate, guns, and even body parts. How does it work and where does it go from here? Lawrence Bonasser is a professor of biomedical engineering at Cornell. Max Lobovsky is the founder of FormLabs, a start-up company that is creating a more affordable professional 3D printer.

Comments [3]

Why the Allegations Against Pistorius Represent an Opportunity for South Africa

Friday, February 22, 2013

In South Africa,  the drama surrounding Oscar Pistorius — the first runner with prosthetic legs to compete alongside able-bodied sprinters in the Olympics — continues. Here's why his case could provide the impetus to finally reform the country's relationship with domestic violence.

Comment