Streams

Mythili Rao

Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Eating Healthier on Food Stamps

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Fast food appealing for so many Americans is because it’s often significantly cheaper than fresh, healthy equivalents. A new study offers one model of how to change that. By offering food stamp users a rebate of 30 cents for every dollar of fresh fruits and vegetables they purchased, the researchers were able to incentivize food stamp users to eat more vegetables and fruits by a full 25 percent. Diane Schanzenbach, Associate Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University, authored the study.

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The Science of Charitable Giving

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Last year, Giving Tuesday brought $10 million in dollars of donations to charities, though it's a small sum compared to the billions of dollars spent on all other shopping days like Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday. Peter Singer, a bioethics professor at Princeton University, teaches a course on charitable giving and is the author of "The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty." He joins The takeaway to discuss why Americans don't give more.

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Men and Women Have Different Brain Circuitry

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Men and women are different—is this news? According to a new study it is. Using a technique called diffusion tensor imaging, researchers have discovered that the basic circuitry of men and women’s brains is visibly different. Ragini Verma, Associate Professor in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Radiology, is one of the study's co-authors. She joins The Takeaway to discuss her findings. 

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Can French Troops Tackle Violence in Central African Republic?

Monday, December 02, 2013

In the coming weeks, about 1,000 French soldiers will be taking up new posts in the Central African Republic (CAR). The French government says the violence currently being witnessed in CAR borders on genocide. Hannah McNeish, a freelance journalist just back from the Central African Republic, gives us an update on the sectarian conflict. Author Samuel Laurent is an expert on the lasting legacy of French colonial Africa and critical about his country's response to the crisis.

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Retro Report: The Making of ‘Three Strikes’ Laws

Monday, December 02, 2013

This week our friends at the Retro Report documentary team take us back to 1992 when Kimber Reynolds, the 18-year-old daughter of Fresno wedding photographer Mike Reynolds, was brutally killed in a robbery. Kimber's death prompted the passage of "Three Strikes" legislation. Karen Sughrue, Retro Report producer, joins The Takeaway.

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HealthCare.Gov Site Picks Up Speed

Monday, December 02, 2013

HealthCare.gov can reportedly now handle 800,000 users a day. But with Americans rushing to meet the December 23rd enrollment deadline in order to get coverage by January 1st, administration officials admit the site might become overloaded. Congresswoman Diana DeGette, a Democrat representing Colorado’s 1st district, is among those who have been concerned.

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Pope Francis Criticizes "Tyranny" of Unchecked Capitalism

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

On Tuesday, Pope Francis released an 84-page theological manifesto railing against what he called the “tyranny” of unfettered capitalism. The memo also calls for global leaders to fight poverty.  It’s not often that the leader of a powerful institution stands before those he represents and declares a complete change of focus. Reverend James Bretzke, Professor of Moral Theology at Boston College School of Theology and Ministry puts Pope Francis's remarks into historical context.  

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Examining Our Changing American Families

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

What does your family look like? The quintessential American family has been changing dramatically in recent years. This week, we're talking about those changes and how they will be reflected at your Thanksgiving table. We're asking about your families as our partner The New York Times takes up the question. Natalie Angier is the reporter behind this effort. Andrew Solomon, author of “Far from the Tree,” writes about all kinds of different families and different kinds of love—notably his own composite clan. 

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Why Has the Stock Market Been Climbing?

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

The NASDAQ reached its highest levels in 13 years this week, breaching the 4,000 mark—and putting the index 33 percent higher than where it was last year. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the Standard & Poor's 500 have already set several records of their own this year. So what’s driving this spike? And what do these climbing stock prices tell us about the broader health of the economy? Rana Foroohar, Assistant Managing Editor of Time Magazine, takes a look at the forces pushing our economy and markets.

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Revisiting the Dark and Toxic Tale of Love Canal

Monday, November 25, 2013

The Retro Report documentary team takes us back to 1978, when residents of Love Canal in Niagara Falls, New York got some shocking news about the disposal of toxic chemicals in their community: In the 1940s and 50s, Hooker Chemical company had dumped 21,800 tons of toxic waste in the canal. Thirty-five years later, J. P. Olsen, producer for Retro Report, reports on what he found when he went back to the community.

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Gov. Christie Inches Closer to National Spotlight

Friday, November 22, 2013

This week, GOP governors from around the country convened in Scottsdale, Arizona for the annual Republican Governor’s Association Conference—a chance to welcome their new chairman, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. The meeting is a chance for Gov. Christie to elevate his own profile and hobnob with some of the GOP's biggest donors.  Matt Katz, New Jersey Public Radio reporter has been reporting on this year’s RGA conference.

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A European Perspective on the Recession & Recovery

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Have American financial regulators and investors really learned from the mistakes that set off the financial crisis five years ago? Faisal Islam is the economics editor for Channel 4 News and author of “The Default Line: The Inside Story of People, Banks, and Entire Nations on the Edge.” He says so much of the story behind the financial collapse is one of excessive risk and recklessness. He joins the program to provide the British perspective on global financial crisis and why the story of the collapse is actually a series of portraits rather than a series of ideas.

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The Crash of 2016: Thom Hartmann on the Future of the U.S. Economy

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Did we learn from the financial crisis? Thom Hartmann, host of “The Thom Hartmann Program," doesn't think so. Hartmann is the author of a new book titled, “The Crash of 2016: The Plot to Destroy America and What We Can Do to Stop It.” In it, he warns that the U.S. economy is on track for another collapse—perhaps more devastating than the last one.

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Selfie Named Word of the Year by Oxford Dictionaries

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Selfie has been named by Oxford Dictionaries as the 2013 Word of the Year. Though selfies have gotten a bad rap as the crowning achievement of a narcissistic self-absorbed, self-obsessed youth culture, writer Casey Cep says young people today didn't actually invent the selfie—today’s cropped, filtered and instantly shared selfies in fact stem from a long, rich tradition of self-portraiture. Before we dismiss the selfie, she argues we should consider all that it has to offer.

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2013 Is Officially the Year of the Selfie

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Smile! It’s The Year of the Selfie.

Read More

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Egyptomania: Why An Ancient Culture Holds Our Fascination

Monday, November 18, 2013

What's behind our enduring fascination with all things ancient Egypt? After 30 years of studying pharaohs, mummies, pyramids, and other artifacts of ancient life along the Nile River, Bob Brier, senior research fellow at Long Island University, has a few ideas. It's a bit of escapism, a bit of exoticism—and more than a bit of admiration for a people and culture that has managed to achieve a kind of immortality. Brier's new book is called “Egyptopmania: Our Three Thousand Year Obsession with the Land of the Pharaohs.”

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Examining The Fed Under Janet Yellen's Stewardship

Friday, November 15, 2013

Janet Yellen, President Barack Obama’s nominee for chair of the Federal Reserve, gave a passionate defense of stimulus efforts in Senate hearings Thursday. If confirmed, Yellen, who currently holds the number two post at the Fed, is expected to reinforce many of the policies current Chairman Ben Bernanke has put in place. But there are some significant ways in which her economic philosophies differ from Bernanke’s.  Heidi Moore, finance and economics editor for The Guardian U.S. explains.

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Scandals Around Toronto Mayor Rob Ford Threaten City's Image

Friday, November 15, 2013

Most Americans have probably heard the soundbite that's been echoing around the world. "Yes, I have smoked crack cocaine," Toronto Mayor Rob Ford admitted last week. "Am I an addict? No. Have I tried it ? Probably in one of my drunken stupors, probably approximately a year ago." Stephen Marche, novelist and contributing editor for Esquire is a Toronto native. He recently wrote an op-ed in our partner The New York Times about the image of Toronto under Ford.

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Cricket Legend Sachin Tendulkar to Retire

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Today, Indian cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar played the start of his 200th and final test match—the match that marks the coming close of his 24-year career.The “Little Master,” as he’s sometimes called, is a sports icon like no other. In 2011, he led India to a cricket World Cup victory but long before that, he captured the heart of the country with his exploits. Rahul Tandon, BBC Cricket reporter in Mumbai, reflects on day the first day of Tendulkar's last match.

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Love and Hate in Dallas

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Two new, distinct art projects are trying to reclaim the city of Dallas' reputation by casting a new narrative. The first is called "Dallas Love"—a rebuff to those who dubbed Dallas "the city of hate." Karen Blessen is its Executive Director. The second is a documentary film, directed by Quin Matthews, called “City of Hate: Dallas and the Assassination.” Blessen and Matthews join The Takeaway to discuss their own memories of Kennedy's death and how the city is responding some 50 years later.

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