Streams

Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

Jesse Bering on 'The Belief Instinct'

Monday, February 07, 2011

Why do some of us believe in God? Why do we grapple for meaning and a sense of purpose in our everyday lives? Author, Jesse Bering explores whether humans are evolutionarily designed to believe in a higher power in his new book, “The Belief Instinct: The Psychology of Souls, Destiny, and the Meaning of Life.”

 

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Best (and Worst) Super Bowl Commercials

Monday, February 07, 2011

Most of us prefer to fast-forward through TV commercials in our everyday lives. But on Super Bowl Sunday, the ads are almost as hyped as the game itself.

Featuring celebrity endorsements, special effects, and the kind of humor that pushes the envelope, Super Bowl ads have the potential to become iconic, and our digital age, viral. Not surprisingly, this also means the price of a commercial is high. For this past weekend’s game, companies paid approximately three million dollars per thirty second spot. (Check out some of the ads after the jump.)

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Amistad, in Epic Verse

Monday, February 07, 2011

Some of us learned about the Amistad revolt in our school history classes. Some of us only know about it because of the 1997 movie starring Morgan Freeman and Anthony Hopkins. But many of us still know little or nothing about those involved in the 1839 slave ship revolt that became a symbol for the abolitionist movement. In his new book, “Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebels,” Kevin Young attempts to change this.

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Movie Date: Revolutionary Films

Friday, February 04, 2011

In honor the people in Egypt, Tunisia, and elsewhere who have been rising up, Kristen and Rafer share their favorite movies that celebrate the revolutionary spirit.

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365 Days of Oscars

Friday, February 04, 2011

It’s February 4, less than three and a half weeks before the Academy Awards telecast. For some people, three and a half weeks might seem like the perfect time to start discussing the big awards show. But if I had my way, everybody in America would be talking about the Oscars every day of the year. I already do. And now I'm blogging about the big show as much as I possibly can.

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Looking Ahead at the Super Bowl with a Real Steeler and a Real Packer

Friday, February 04, 2011

This Sunday, football fans around the country will be cheering on two teams that have come to be known for their colors, their devoted fans, and their long history in the NFL. Of course, there’s at least one other thing the teams are also known for: their names, which are linked to proud professions and industries unique to each region.

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The Prayer Campaign for a Slain Ugandan Gay Rights Activist

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Today is the National Prayer Breakfast, an annual event attended by President Obama and organized by “The Family,” a Washington-based fellowship of Christian politicians. “The Family” is also known for its close affiliation with the Ugandan politicians who proposed making homosexuality a capital offense. A coalition of religious leaders are now calling on President Obama to recite a prayer for David Kato, a prominent, Ugandan gay rights activist who was bludgeoned to death in January, at the National Prayer Breakfast today. 

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Korean New Year Foods and Traditions with Kelly Choi

Thursday, February 03, 2011

For cultures that follow the lunar calendar, today is New Year’s Day. Here in the U.S., many of us simply refer to it as Chinese New Year. But the truth is that communities in and from Vietnam, Korea, Mongolia, Tibet, and elsewhere have their own traditions and foods built around the day. Kelly Choi is the host of "Top Chef Masters" and is a Korean-American. She is personally acquainted with the Korean New Year, or “Seolnal,” as it’s often called. She shares her recipes for the celebration.

Recipes after the jump.

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How Video Games Can Save the World

Thursday, February 03, 2011

All of her life, Jane McGonigal has been interested in games. At the tender age of ten, she programmed her first game on a Commodore 64. In the years since, she’s designed award winning alternate reality games and massively multiplayer online games — some of which celebrate the fun of dancing, others that deal with human extinction.

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A Mother's Secret Life, a Daughter's Discovery

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

When Jasmin Darznik was three, she and her family moved to the U.S. from Iran. Growing up, she had little knowledge of her parents’ lives before immigration. But when she was in her early twenties, Darznik came across a picture of her mother as a young teenage girl, wearing a wedding veil. That picture piqued her curiosity, and led her down a path of family history filled with abuse, neglect, and a half sister she knew nothing about.

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Scary Storms Hit on Groundhog Day

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

For over 75 years, Pennsylvania Germans have gathered in what they call Groundhog (or “Groundsaw”) Lodges to celebrate their language, traditions, and culture. The most important day in lodge culture is, of course, today, Groundhog Day. However, it's hard to think of spring, when more than 30 states are under blizzard warnings, with snow hitting much of the country.

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Abuelaish's Story: 'I Shall Not Hate'

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Egypt has a key role as an ally to both Israel and Gazan Palestinians. It's one of the few countries that has a relationship with both groups. As the political ground shifts yet again in the Middle East, we take a look at one Palestinian doctor and how he came to be an advocate for peace in Gaza.

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Documentary Reveals Systemic Failures at Coroners' Offices

Monday, January 31, 2011

Every day, nearly 7,000 people in America die. And when the deaths are unexpected, sudden or suspicious, it’s presumed that a thorough investigation will take place.

Though you might expect a thorgough and high-level investigation from TV shows like CSI, the reality is quite different. In over 1,300 counties across the United States, elected coroners are in charge of death investigations — many with no medical or scientific background. To run for coroner in most counties, all you need is a high school diploma.

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Movie Date: What's Wrong with this Year's Oscar Nominations

Friday, January 28, 2011

The biggest movie news of the week, and the second biggest movie news of the year, happened this week: The nominations for the 83rd Academy Awards. Kristen and Rafer size up the field of Oscar contenders, how "The King's Speech" became the favorite and why "True Grit" was redeemed. And Kristen laments the lack of diversity in this year's lineup.

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25 Years After Challenger: Remembering Christa McAuliffe

Friday, January 28, 2011

Twenty five years ago today, NASA launched the Challenger, sending one of its most highly anticipated and diverse space crews ever into space. The astronauts included one African American, one Asian-American, one Jew, and two women, one of whom was a school teacher named Christa McAuliffe. And the mission ended only 73 seconds into flight, when the Challenger exploded nine miles above the Atlantic. Millions of people across the world, including McAuliffe’s students and fellow teachers, watched the tragedy live and in repeated news clips. We’re joined today by two people who knew our first official teacher in space.

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Where is the Diversity in This Year's Oscar Nods?

Friday, January 28, 2011

When the Oscar nominees were announced on Tuesday, Takeaway producer, Kristen Meinzer noticed that they were — by her measurements — the least culturally and racially diverse in over a decade. Kristen is here with Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday and co-host for the Takeaway’s Movie Date podcast, to discuss race and the Oscars.

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Alan Lomax: Recorder of the World, Creator of Pandora?

Thursday, January 27, 2011

To many people, Alan Lomax is simply the man who introduced the world to Woody Guthrie (and legendary folk songs like “This Land is Your Land”). But for Alan Lomax, Guthrie was just one of thousands of musical discoveries made over the course of more than half a century. Lomax, who served as Assistant Folk Song Archivist for the Library of Congress in the 1930s, recorded music from some of the most remote corners and people on earth — including Caribbean field workers, pygmies and black American prisoners. But how much do we know about the respected oral historian, producer, and interviewer? 

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The Internet: Liberator or Controller?

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

When Iranians demonstrated against Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s regime in 2009, the U.S. government and media outlets identified the ultimate tool of the dissident masses to be Twitter. When insisting that nothing like the Rwandan genocide could ever happen again, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown explained: “information would come out far more quickly” and “public opinion would grow to the point where action would need to be taken.” All over the world, we see the power that the Internet has in mobilizing the masses. But at the same time, repressive governments are finding ways to launch "denial of service" attacks.

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The Oscar Nominations: Surprising, Exciting (and Very White)

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder once sang that there's good and bad in everyone. And that applies to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as much as it does to the rest of us. When I tuned in to this morning's Oscar nominations announcement, I kept this in mind.

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Oscars: 'The King's Speech,' 'Black Swan,' 'Toy Story 3,' Among Best Picture Nominees

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

"True Grit," "Inception," "The Kids are All Right" and "Toy Story 3" get Oscar nods. Takeaway producer Kristen Meinzer takes us through the Oscar nominees. The full list is after the jump.

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