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Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

Jim Crow: The Supreme Court's Fault?

Monday, February 28, 2011

Immediately after the end of the Civil War, Congress drafted and pushed to ratify the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution, which were intended to guarantee African-Americans full equality under the law. But despite these amendments, Jim Crow laws quickly took hold of much of the nation, stripping African-Americans of such basic rights as serving on juries and voting without the penalty of a poll tax. What went wrong?

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Movie Date: Oscar Picks

Friday, February 25, 2011

In this week's Movie Date podcast, Rafer and Kristen share their Oscar predictions and preferences for the big five categories — supporting actress, supporting actor, lead actress, lead actor, and picture. They also throw in a wild card category that they both admit they know nothing about.

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Who Will - and Who Should - Win Oscars

Friday, February 25, 2011

It’s hard to believe that Oscars day – my favorite day of the year – is only 48 hours away.

All year, I’ve been gearing up for the big day, watching everything from awful foreign language flicks (the worst: "Biutiful") to amazingly touching animated shorts (my favorite: "The Lost Thing").

Below are my predictions for who I think will win and who I want to win for a dozen randomly selected categories. Check back in late Sunday night/early Monday morning to get the final (and full) list of winners and be sure to follow my live Tweeting on Oscar night.

And don't forget, to make your own picks before Sunday!

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Movie Date: Rafer and Kristen's Oscar Picks

Friday, February 25, 2011

The Oscars are this Sunday at 8 p.m. Eastern Time and all week long, we’ve been gearing up for the big night, interviewing nominees and blogging about the awards show. And even before their nominations were announced, we were sitting down with Melissa Leo, Colin Firth, and Danny Boyle. Today we'll make our final bets on the weekend's winners and losers.

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Insights from the Grandson of the Real King's Speech Therapist

Thursday, February 24, 2011

This Sunday all eyes in the movie-watching world will be focused on “The King’s Speech.” With twelve Oscar nods, it’s the most nominated film of the year. Inspired by the real story of King George VI and his speech therapist Lionel Logue, the film celebrates their friendship, and the unorthodox means Logue enlists to help George overcome his stuttering. Mark Logue is the grandson of Lionel Logue.

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'Morning, Noon and Night': Books for Life's Many Stages

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Perhaps you’ve heard this riddle before: “What is the creature that is on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs at night?" The answer is “a man.” Greek mythology has it that the riddle was posed by Sphinx to Oedipus. And it’s this riddle that’s the jumping off point of Arnold Weinstein’s new book “Morning, Noon and Night: Finding the Meaning of life's Stages Through Books.” Both an ode to books and a reminder of their ability to help us through life’s stages.

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A New Perspective on the American Revolution

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

American patriot lore tells us that the story of the American Revolution is simple. Oppressive British overlords wanted to profit from settlers in the new world. But patriots, led by the likes of Paul Revere and George Washington fought for the independence of the colonies. We fought the red coats. We won. And we’ve all lived happily ever after. Maya Jasanoff has a slightly different story to tell.

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Live Action Short Oscar Nominee Luke Matheny on 'God of Love'

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

The Oscars are on Sunday and we take a closer look at what it's like to be nominated for an Academy Award. Luke Matheny is the director, writer and star of “God of Love,” a semi-tragic romantic comedy, which is nominated for best live action short. A first-time nominee, Matheny made his film as a school project. He explains what went into making his school film.

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Home Loans to Minority Applicants Plunge

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

In the 1980s and 1990s banks avoided lending in minority neighborhoods and Blacks and Latinos were denied mortgages at disproportionately higher rates than equally credit-worthy whites. Redlining and mortgage discrimination was the norm. It seemed those days came to an end in the 2000s, when mortgage lenders began lending eagerly to anyone they could, and instead of being accused of avoiding minority borrowers, faced accusations of predatory lending in minority communities. However, now the tide has turned once again.

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From 'E.T.' to 'Black Swan,' How Oscar Nods Influence Product Sales

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Last season, the New York City Ballet and other large dance companies in the U.S. had an average attendance of only 73 percent, according to Dance/USA. But this year, the City Ballet is facing a different attendance issue: sold-out tickets for their entire two-week run of “Swan Lake.”

What changed, you might ask? Two words: “Black Swan.” And one more word: “Oscar.”

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T.C. Boyle on 'When the Killing's Done'

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

In 1853, a steamship named the Winfield Scott ran aground near the Channel Islands, which are off the coast of California. Unfortunately, when the ship landed, so did a certain foreign species that reproduced quickly, and ate the eggs of native birds and reptiles: the black rat. In 2001, the National Park Service began fighting the rats with poison. Members of a fringe environmental group responded by scattering vitamin K — an antidote to the poison. It’s this real struggle between warring environmentalists, humans, and animals that is at the center of T.C. Boyle’s newest novel “When the Killing’s Done.”

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Oscar Nominee Jed Rothstein on 'Killing In the Name'

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

All this week on the Takeaway, we’re talking with people who are nominated for Oscars, and who’ve worked behind the scenes on Oscar-nominated films. Jed Rothstein is the director of “Killing in the Name,” which is nominated for best documentary short. “Killing in the Name” centers on Ashraf Al-Khaled, whose 2005 wedding was attacked by a suicide bomber, killing three out of four of his and his wife’s parents, and a total of 27 of their guests. 

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Are There Too Many Oscars Categories?

Monday, February 21, 2011

Today’s Los Angeles Times features an article about the lack of recognition that casting directors get at the Oscars. Today’s New York Times features a brief piece on the lack of recognition that opening and closing credit sequences get at the awards. For years, there have been campaigns to remedy the lack of recognition that stuntmen get at the Academies. And no doubt, for as long as the Oscars continue to exist, there will be even more categories (many that we’ve never heard of) that some people think ought to be added to the awards show.

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Our Personalities, Our Selves

Monday, February 21, 2011

In America, we’re told from the time we’re born that there’s no one else like us in the world, and that our unique personalities really and truly are one of a kind. But is this really true? And if so, how did our personalities get the way they are? Is there any way to change our personalities to make our lives easier?

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Should the Oscars Be a Soap Box?

Friday, February 18, 2011

Over thirty-five years ago, a woman in traditional Apache dress named Sacheen Littlefeather accepted Marlon Brando’s Oscar for “The Godfather.” But do you remember why Brando chose her to take his place?

Twenty years ago, the red AIDS ribbon was every star’s favorite Oscars accessory. But almost as quickly as it became trendy, it disappeared. Do you remember the last year all the celebrities wore red ribbons?

And a mere two years ago, the Kodak Theatre exploded into thunderous applause when Sean Penn said protestors outside the venue should be ashamed of themselves. But do you remember the reason for the protests?

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This Weekend's Movies: from 'Unknown' to 'Vidal Sassoon"

Friday, February 18, 2011

While not the biggest weekend for new film releases, today does kick off a varied menu, from Liam Neeson's thriller "Unkown" to the "Vidal Sassoon" documentary. We check in with Takeaway producer Kristen Meinzer and Takeaway film contributor Rafer Guzman to get a grasp on what's hot and what will flop. 

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Movie Date: Paranormal Teen Romances

Friday, February 18, 2011

Each week, Rafer and Kristen spar about the movies they think you should or shouldn't see. This week, they ponder whether the new paranormal teen romance film "I Am Number Four" is the new "Twilight" or just a substandard rip-off. And it's one of those rare times when they're actually in agreement.

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Anna Nicole Smith: The Opera

Friday, February 18, 2011

Four years ago this month at age thirty-nine, Playboy model, reality star and tabloid fixture Anna Nicole Smith died. Her tumultuous life included dropping out of high school, teen parenthood, stripping, plastic surgery, accusations of gold-digging, and repeated struggles with drugs and alcohol. But while Anna Nicole is no longer with us, she’s alive and well at the Royal Opera House in London. A new opera called 'Anna Nicole' premiered last night. Composed by Mark-Anthony Turnage and written by Richard Thomas, it stars Dutch soprano Eva-Maria Westbroek in the title role.

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Where Does Creativity Come From?

Thursday, February 17, 2011

What makes us creative? What can make us more creative? And where do truly creative people find their inspiration? These are questions that Kurt Andersen and Julie Burstein have been asking for over a decade on PRI’s arts and culture program Studio 360. Kurt is the host of the show. Julie is its former executive producer. And this week, a new book penned by Julie, with a forward by Kurt, hits stores. It’s called “Spark: How Creativity Works,” and it features insights from some of the greatest creative minds of our time, including Chuck Close, Yo Yo Ma, Rosanne Cash, Kevin Bacon, and Joyce Carol Oates.

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A Journey From Black to White

Thursday, February 17, 2011

The narrative of African Americans “passing” into white culture has long persisted. These stories are often tragic and filled with shame, secrecy, and the abandonment of home and family. In his new book, “The Invisible Line,” Daniel Sharfstein looks at three families that were once identified as black and are now viewed as white. These stories are ones of pride as white families reconnect with their African-American roots.

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