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Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

Should the Oscars Be a Soap Box?

Friday, February 18, 2011

Over thirty-five years ago, a woman in traditional Apache dress named Sacheen Littlefeather accepted Marlon Brando’s Oscar for “The Godfather.” But do you remember why Brando chose her to take his place?

Twenty years ago, the red AIDS ribbon was every star’s favorite Oscars accessory. But almost as quickly as it became trendy, it disappeared. Do you remember the last year all the celebrities wore red ribbons?

And a mere two years ago, the Kodak Theatre exploded into thunderous applause when Sean Penn said protestors outside the venue should be ashamed of themselves. But do you remember the reason for the protests?

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This Weekend's Movies: from 'Unknown' to 'Vidal Sassoon"

Friday, February 18, 2011

While not the biggest weekend for new film releases, today does kick off a varied menu, from Liam Neeson's thriller "Unkown" to the "Vidal Sassoon" documentary. We check in with Takeaway producer Kristen Meinzer and Takeaway film contributor Rafer Guzman to get a grasp on what's hot and what will flop. 

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Movie Date: Paranormal Teen Romances

Friday, February 18, 2011

Each week, Rafer and Kristen spar about the movies they think you should or shouldn't see. This week, they ponder whether the new paranormal teen romance film "I Am Number Four" is the new "Twilight" or just a substandard rip-off. And it's one of those rare times when they're actually in agreement.

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Anna Nicole Smith: The Opera

Friday, February 18, 2011

Four years ago this month at age thirty-nine, Playboy model, reality star and tabloid fixture Anna Nicole Smith died. Her tumultuous life included dropping out of high school, teen parenthood, stripping, plastic surgery, accusations of gold-digging, and repeated struggles with drugs and alcohol. But while Anna Nicole is no longer with us, she’s alive and well at the Royal Opera House in London. A new opera called 'Anna Nicole' premiered last night. Composed by Mark-Anthony Turnage and written by Richard Thomas, it stars Dutch soprano Eva-Maria Westbroek in the title role.

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Where Does Creativity Come From?

Thursday, February 17, 2011

What makes us creative? What can make us more creative? And where do truly creative people find their inspiration? These are questions that Kurt Andersen and Julie Burstein have been asking for over a decade on PRI’s arts and culture program Studio 360. Kurt is the host of the show. Julie is its former executive producer. And this week, a new book penned by Julie, with a forward by Kurt, hits stores. It’s called “Spark: How Creativity Works,” and it features insights from some of the greatest creative minds of our time, including Chuck Close, Yo Yo Ma, Rosanne Cash, Kevin Bacon, and Joyce Carol Oates.

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A Journey From Black to White

Thursday, February 17, 2011

The narrative of African Americans “passing” into white culture has long persisted. These stories are often tragic and filled with shame, secrecy, and the abandonment of home and family. In his new book, “The Invisible Line,” Daniel Sharfstein looks at three families that were once identified as black and are now viewed as white. These stories are ones of pride as white families reconnect with their African-American roots.

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Betting on the Oscar Winners

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Let’s make something clear. I am not a gambler. I hate the stock market. I have no interest in watching celebrity poker. On the two occasions I visited Las Vegas, I played only the penny slots (and limited the value of the pennies to $20 total for 6 hours, not counting the extra $20 my sister pushed on me).

That being said, I cannot resist a little Oscar gambling. And I’m not alone. According to Gambling911.com, the Oscars are “the 3rd biggest single day betting event of the year after the Super Bowl and Kentucky Derby” and “the most wagered on nonsporting event after the U.S. Presidential race.”

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How the West Was...Lost?

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

It’s said that the road to hell is paved with good intentions…But does that apply to the leaders of powerful countries? What if programs that were intended to help Americans — things like pensions, healthcare, and subsidized housing were hurting us instead? Dambisa Moyo is an economist and author of the new book: "How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly – and the Stark Choices ahead."

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Using Food to Tell the Story of War

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

We often look at war in terms of numbers of soldiers deployed, numbers of lost lives, and of dollars spent on battles and reconstruction. But war is about much more; it’s about sounds and sights, and about shared experiences, and though we rarely talk about it, war is also about food. Annia Ciezadlo explores this particular aspect of war in her new book: “Day of Honey: a Memoir of Food, Love, and War.”

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Westminster Dog Show and Chaser: The World's Smartest Dog?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Today the granddaddy of all dog shows — the Westminster Dog Show — kicks off. As you may know, it’s something of a beauty contest for dogs. And last year, we commemorated the event by asking listeners to submit pictures of their dogs for our cutest dog contest. But this year, we’re more interested in brains than looks. We’re asking you to send in pictures and videos of your dogs being brilliant. As she did last year, WNYC's Sarah Montague will judge your entries this week. And today we’re talking with two scientists who know a thing or two about canine intelligence.

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Cities: Better For Your Health and Happiness?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Over 249 million Americans live on the three percent of land that constitutes our cities. More than half of America’s income is earned in 22 metropolitan areas. And people live longer in New York City than anywhere else in the U.S. That being said, our nation continues to grapple with negative perceptions about cities. Images of loud, dirty, noisy, graffiti and crime-ridden urban wastelands persist. Economist Ed Glaeser wants to change that. He’s convinced that cities make us better, and that the proof can be seen everywhere from Minneapolis to Shanghai.

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Bon Voyage, Best Actress Oscar Curse

Monday, February 14, 2011

It’s Valentine’s Day, and I can’t think of a better time to discuss what’s come to be known as the Best Actress Oscar Curse. No doubt, you’ve heard about it by now. If you haven’t, here’s a little crash course, starting with Sandra Bullock.

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Air Supply on What Makes a Great Love Song

Monday, February 14, 2011

On Valentine’s Day, we’re going to be joined by the high priests of the top forty love song: Air Supply, also known as Graham Russell and Russell Hitchcock. Their mission: to help Takeaway listeners with their love song conundrums. Whether it’s the best song for getting over a breakup or the best song for saying “I love you,” Graham and Russell have plenty of wisdom to share. Tell us: what love song do you love (or hate) the most?

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Movie Date: The Many Talents of Justin Bieber

Friday, February 11, 2011

This week, Kristen and Rafer talk about "Justin Bieber: Never Say Never," and about whether or not either of them are Beliebers after seeing the new doc.

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Barack Obama's African Family Tree

Thursday, February 10, 2011

A new book traces Barack Obama's Kenyan family back twenty-three generations, or roughly half a millennium. Peter Firstbrook was a documentary filmmaker for our partner, the BBC, for 25 years, is the author of “The Obamas: The Untold Story of an African Family.”  Using oral testimony from family and historical documents, Firstbrook uncovered some fascinating details of the president's family, including questions about how President Obama's father died.

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Books: The Revolution Will Be Written

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Citizens have protested in Tunisia. There are threats of an uprising in Jordan. And it's day seventeen of public demonstrations against the government in Egypt.

Revolution is sweeping across northern Africa and the Middle East, and, in recognition of these revolutions, Patrik Henry Bass, senior editor at Essence Magazine, shares his favorite revolutionary books.

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Give Melissa Leo a Break

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

A lot of people seem to be in a big uproar over Oscar-nominee Melissa Leo’s audacity. As you may have heard, she’s been campaigning for an Oscar, and not in the usual ways. Yes, she’s doing interviews with Oprah and other national media outlets (including “The Takeaway”). And yes, she’s stopping and chatting with the press whenever she hits the red carpet. But in addition to the usual tactics, she’s also mounted her own campaign, paid for and orchestrated not by a PR company or a film company (as these campaigns usually are), but by herself.

 

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What We Know About Donald Rumsfeld

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

"There are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns — the ones we don't know we don't know…"

That’s former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, talking about what we know and don’t know, with regard to weapons of mass destruction. But when it comes to the secretary himself, what do we know?

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Ranking the Financial IQ of the World's Children

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Remember that international exam last month that embarrassed a lot of Americans? The scores, you might recall, ranked U.S. children firmly below average in math and finally, after years, average at science. The test is called the Program for International Student Assessment exam, or PISA. And as it so happens, next year’s version of the PISA will feature a new section on financial literacy. But why financial literacy? And how well (or not well) will American kids do this next time around?

What do you think? Should kids be required to learn financial literacy? Why or why not? At what age do kids need to learn financial literacy?

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'Winter's Bone': The Last of the Ten Best Picture Nods

Monday, February 07, 2011

There was a time when just about every man, woman, and child in America could see all the best picture Oscar nominees before the big night; a time when the number of nominees was so manageable that you could see one movie a week between the nominations announcement and the awards show and still see them all. More innocent times, more innocent days, I remember them well. It’s hard not to. It was only two years ago. But then 2010 came along and changed everything. Or, more accurately, changed everything back.

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