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Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

Music Company to Consumer: Name Your Price

Thursday, March 03, 2011

The music industry has been criticized in recent years for having too many manufactured stars, and not enough artists; too many middle men making money, and not enough musicians being paid. But some are trying to forge a new way for a viable music market, like Stephen Nawara. He is a Detroit entrepreneur who has created a new site that lets customers to pay want they want, even if that amount is nothing at all.

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Rewriting History, One Family Photo at a Time

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

They say that history is written by the people in power. And for centuries in the Western world, that meant that stories by and about people descending from Africa were barely touched upon in the history books. The Digital Diaspora Family Reunion (DDFR) is trying to change that. A web-based multi-media project, the DDFR encourages people with African ancestry to submit family photos, along with stories, from their own attics and shoeboxes.

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'She-Wolves:' Queens Before Elizabeth

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

In England, and around the world, all eyes may be on Kate Middleton, the future queen. But long before Middleton or even Queen Elizabeth I, women of the monarchy were attracting great attention and wielding surprising power in England. Helen Castor is a historian who’s been delving into the lives of these powerful, but largely unrecognized women, as far back as nine hundred years ago. She’s the author of “She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth.

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With Great Musical Power Comes Great Musical Responsibility

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

“Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark” is the most expensive Broadway production in history, and may very well be the most talked about musical in decades. Boasting a $65 million budget, a score by U2’s Bono and the Edge, twenty seven daredevil flying scenes, and direction by Tony award-winner Julie Taymor, it appears to have all the ingredients for success. But the show has also been plagued by a seemingly endless supply of unintended drama: injuries, postponments and more. Tired of it all, and convinced he could deliver a better Spider-Man musical sooner, Justin Moran wrote and produced his own Spider-Man musical.

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Oscars: The Day After Hollywood's Big Night

Monday, February 28, 2011

"The King's Speech" took home best picture and three other trophies last night at the 83rd Academy Awards. Meanwhile, "Inception" also won four awards, mostly in technical categories. Other memorable moments included an exasperated Melissa Leo dropping the "f-word" while accepting her Oscar for best supporting actress, and co-host James Franco appearing on stage in a dress.

If you missed last night's broadcast, don't fret. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, and co-host of The Takeaway Movie Date Podcast with Takeaway producer Kristen Meinzer, are here to help with their Oscar hangover cure: a hearty mix of the winners, losers, and surprises that will be heating up YouTube and the water cooler conversations today.

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Rep. Gwen Moore on Planned Parenthood and Her Private Life

Monday, February 28, 2011

A little over a week ago, in the midst of the heated debates around our nation’s proposed federal budget cuts, Congresswoman Gwen Moore (D-WI) attracted national attention. After 240 of 241 House Republicans voted to strip Planned Parenthood of government funding, Moore spoke up. But rather than just explain that Planned Parenthood is the nation’s leading provider of reproductive health care, she chose to tell her personal story of growing up as a poor, single, teenage mother. Congresswoman Moore joins us from Wisconsin to talk about her story and her thoughts on reproductive health funding.

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Oscars 2011: Young, Hip Hosts in a Decidedly Unyoung and Unhip Show

Monday, February 28, 2011

After nearly four hours of winners and losers and montages and speeches and glitzy gowns and fancy jewels, all I can say is … not every Oscars can be magical.

Or, more accurately, the Oscars can be downright boring.

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Jim Crow: The Supreme Court's Fault?

Monday, February 28, 2011

Immediately after the end of the Civil War, Congress drafted and pushed to ratify the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution, which were intended to guarantee African-Americans full equality under the law. But despite these amendments, Jim Crow laws quickly took hold of much of the nation, stripping African-Americans of such basic rights as serving on juries and voting without the penalty of a poll tax. What went wrong?

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Movie Date: Oscar Picks

Friday, February 25, 2011

In this week's Movie Date podcast, Rafer and Kristen share their Oscar predictions and preferences for the big five categories — supporting actress, supporting actor, lead actress, lead actor, and picture. They also throw in a wild card category that they both admit they know nothing about.

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Who Will - and Who Should - Win Oscars

Friday, February 25, 2011

It’s hard to believe that Oscars day – my favorite day of the year – is only 48 hours away.

All year, I’ve been gearing up for the big day, watching everything from awful foreign language flicks (the worst: "Biutiful") to amazingly touching animated shorts (my favorite: "The Lost Thing").

Below are my predictions for who I think will win and who I want to win for a dozen randomly selected categories. Check back in late Sunday night/early Monday morning to get the final (and full) list of winners and be sure to follow my live Tweeting on Oscar night.

And don't forget, to make your own picks before Sunday!

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Movie Date: Rafer and Kristen's Oscar Picks

Friday, February 25, 2011

The Oscars are this Sunday at 8 p.m. Eastern Time and all week long, we’ve been gearing up for the big night, interviewing nominees and blogging about the awards show. And even before their nominations were announced, we were sitting down with Melissa Leo, Colin Firth, and Danny Boyle. Today we'll make our final bets on the weekend's winners and losers.

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Insights from the Grandson of the Real King's Speech Therapist

Thursday, February 24, 2011

This Sunday all eyes in the movie-watching world will be focused on “The King’s Speech.” With twelve Oscar nods, it’s the most nominated film of the year. Inspired by the real story of King George VI and his speech therapist Lionel Logue, the film celebrates their friendship, and the unorthodox means Logue enlists to help George overcome his stuttering. Mark Logue is the grandson of Lionel Logue.

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'Morning, Noon and Night': Books for Life's Many Stages

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Perhaps you’ve heard this riddle before: “What is the creature that is on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs at night?" The answer is “a man.” Greek mythology has it that the riddle was posed by Sphinx to Oedipus. And it’s this riddle that’s the jumping off point of Arnold Weinstein’s new book “Morning, Noon and Night: Finding the Meaning of life's Stages Through Books.” Both an ode to books and a reminder of their ability to help us through life’s stages.

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A New Perspective on the American Revolution

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

American patriot lore tells us that the story of the American Revolution is simple. Oppressive British overlords wanted to profit from settlers in the new world. But patriots, led by the likes of Paul Revere and George Washington fought for the independence of the colonies. We fought the red coats. We won. And we’ve all lived happily ever after. Maya Jasanoff has a slightly different story to tell.

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Live Action Short Oscar Nominee Luke Matheny on 'God of Love'

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

The Oscars are on Sunday and we take a closer look at what it's like to be nominated for an Academy Award. Luke Matheny is the director, writer and star of “God of Love,” a semi-tragic romantic comedy, which is nominated for best live action short. A first-time nominee, Matheny made his film as a school project. He explains what went into making his school film.

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Home Loans to Minority Applicants Plunge

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

In the 1980s and 1990s banks avoided lending in minority neighborhoods and Blacks and Latinos were denied mortgages at disproportionately higher rates than equally credit-worthy whites. Redlining and mortgage discrimination was the norm. It seemed those days came to an end in the 2000s, when mortgage lenders began lending eagerly to anyone they could, and instead of being accused of avoiding minority borrowers, faced accusations of predatory lending in minority communities. However, now the tide has turned once again.

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From 'E.T.' to 'Black Swan,' How Oscar Nods Influence Product Sales

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Last season, the New York City Ballet and other large dance companies in the U.S. had an average attendance of only 73 percent, according to Dance/USA. But this year, the City Ballet is facing a different attendance issue: sold-out tickets for their entire two-week run of “Swan Lake.”

What changed, you might ask? Two words: “Black Swan.” And one more word: “Oscar.”

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T.C. Boyle on 'When the Killing's Done'

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

In 1853, a steamship named the Winfield Scott ran aground near the Channel Islands, which are off the coast of California. Unfortunately, when the ship landed, so did a certain foreign species that reproduced quickly, and ate the eggs of native birds and reptiles: the black rat. In 2001, the National Park Service began fighting the rats with poison. Members of a fringe environmental group responded by scattering vitamin K — an antidote to the poison. It’s this real struggle between warring environmentalists, humans, and animals that is at the center of T.C. Boyle’s newest novel “When the Killing’s Done.”

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Oscar Nominee Jed Rothstein on 'Killing In the Name'

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

All this week on the Takeaway, we’re talking with people who are nominated for Oscars, and who’ve worked behind the scenes on Oscar-nominated films. Jed Rothstein is the director of “Killing in the Name,” which is nominated for best documentary short. “Killing in the Name” centers on Ashraf Al-Khaled, whose 2005 wedding was attacked by a suicide bomber, killing three out of four of his and his wife’s parents, and a total of 27 of their guests. 

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Are There Too Many Oscars Categories?

Monday, February 21, 2011

Today’s Los Angeles Times features an article about the lack of recognition that casting directors get at the Oscars. Today’s New York Times features a brief piece on the lack of recognition that opening and closing credit sequences get at the awards. For years, there have been campaigns to remedy the lack of recognition that stuntmen get at the Academies. And no doubt, for as long as the Oscars continue to exist, there will be even more categories (many that we’ve never heard of) that some people think ought to be added to the awards show.

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