Streams

Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

What Became of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370?

Friday, March 14, 2014

From terrorism to catastrophic structural failure to alien tractor beams, theories on the vanishing jetliner have come fast and furious. And one after another, they have themselves disappeared into nothingness. Bob reflects on how a story that lacks not only the “why,” but also the “what,” gets covered in the news.

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Copyright Law for Extraterrestrials

Friday, March 14, 2014

Somewhere at the edge of our heliosphere, billions of miles from Earth, the Voyager 1 spacecraft carries the sounds of a few musicians from our planet into the interstellar void. It also carries a legacy of extraterrestrial copyright law. Bob talks with The New Yorker's music critic Alex Ross about the nature of intergalactic intellectual property.

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Pulling the Trigger Warning

Friday, March 14, 2014

Trigger warnings on the internet have been around for years as a way to prepare for potentially disturbing subjects. Recently a group of students at the University of California, Santa Barbara passed a resolution imploring administrators to include mandatory trigger warnings in potentially offensive syllabi.  Bob speaks to journalist Jenny Jarvie, about the spread of the trigger warning.

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Twitter Cartography

Friday, March 14, 2014

With more than 240 million active users engaged in activities ranging from abetting revolutions to reporting tornadoes, Twitter’s cultural impact can’t be denied. But can we use it to chart how we actually communicate, not just with our own cohorts, but the world outside? Bob talks to Pew Research Center's Lee Rainie about mapping the informational ecosystem of Twitter.

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An Unusual Alliance

Friday, March 07, 2014

The Serbian government has established a commission to investigate unsolved murders of journalists. Remarkably, the commission includes both police and journalists. Bob talks with Politika editor Ljiljana Smajlović about what the commission has already accomplished and her hopes for what it might achieve in the future. 

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Dare to Stream

Friday, March 07, 2014

Bob goes to Hollywood to track down the future of television and locates it....in his laptop. A special report on streaming video.

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RT Anchor Breaks The Rules

Friday, March 07, 2014

Abby Martin, an anchor for the Kremlin-funded news channel Russia Today, launched herself into the headlines this week by sternly denouncing Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine. On her show Breaking The Setshe said: “Just because I work here, for RT, doesn't mean I don't have editorial independence and I can't stress enough how strongly I am against any state intervention in sovereign nations' affairs. What Russia did is wrong.” Given that RT is widely regarded as a 24-hour propaganda machine engineered to polish Russia’s image abroad, Martin shocked many with her outburst. Bob talks with Martin about why she wasn't afraid to speak out. 

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What Exactly Is "Russia Today"?

Friday, March 07, 2014

 

If a journalist criticizing the government on Russia Today airwaves is a shock, how much journalism is happening there in the first place? Newsweek says “when it comes to Ukraine, RT is like going to a Cold War theme park, only without the breadlines.” The National Journal calls RT's characterization of the crisis in Crimea an adventure filled with “TV, sandwiches and selfies.” Bob talks with Julia Ioffe, senior editor at The New Republic, about how RT's coverage perfectly balances Putin-promoting and West-demoting. 
If a journalist criticizing the government on Russia Today airwaves is a shock, how much journalism is happening there in the first place? Newsweek says “when it comes to Ukraine, RT is like going to a Cold War theme park, only without the breadlines.” National Journal calls RT's characterization of the crisis in Crimea an adventure filled with “tea, sandwiches and selfies.” Bob talks with Julia Ioffe, senior editor at The New Republic, about how RT's coverage perfectly balances Putin-promoting and West-demoting. 

 


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The State of Crimean Journalism

Friday, March 07, 2014

Last weekend, as Russian troops flooded into Crimea, Ukraine, 30 armed men in unmarked fatigues broke into the office of the Crimean Center for Investigative Journalism in the region's capital. The incident is one of many recent acts of aggression against journalists in the region.

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Calling for Back Up

Friday, March 07, 2014

Despite the seizure of their office and most of their files and equipment by masked gunmen, the journalists at the Crimean Center for Investigative Journalism were prepared: over the weekend they had backed up their entire web history through the Archive-It service from the Internet ArchiveDavid E. Kaplan, executive director of the Global Investigative Journalism Network and one of the coordinators of the effort, tells Bob just how they managed to pull it off. You can check out what they've saved here and here.

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Investigating Use of Force at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

A recent investigation from The Arizona Republic found that since 2005, at least 42 people have been killed by US Customs and Border Protection agents. But getting information about those incidents is no easy task. Bob speaks with Bob Ortega, one of the reporters behind the investigation, about the difficulty in getting answers on use of force at the border.

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Invasive Cavity Search at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

"Jane Doe" is a 54-year old US citizen who was crossing into the US at the Juarez/El Paso border when agents took her aside for secondary screening. The screening ended up being 6 hours of invasive cavity searches—which yielded nothing and left her traumatized. Bob speaks with Laura Schauer Ives, an ACLU attorney for Jane Doe about what happened at the border that day.

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My Detainment Story or: How I Learned To Stop Feeling Safe In My Own Country and Hate Border Agents

Friday, February 28, 2014

Back in September, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

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Protests in Ukraine

Friday, February 21, 2014

Before an agreement was brokered Friday, the standoff in Kiev between Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s government and the loose coalition of anti-government forces was bloody and telegenic. Bob examines what those gripping images tell us, and what they don't. 

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Fighting Telecom Giants

Friday, February 21, 2014

All across the country, communities are fighting to build their own broadband internet networks as an alternative to the services offered by big cable companies. However, these efforts have often been thwarted by legislation lobbied for by, you guessed it, the cable companies. Bob talks with James Baller, president of the Baller Herbst Law group, who has long been leading the legal charge on behalf of municipalities.

Cake - Fashion Nugget

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Rewriting History

Friday, February 21, 2014

Historical understanding doesn’t always move ahead. Sometimes it slips backwards. Case in point: In 2012, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of official US involvement in Vietnam, the Pentagon quietly launched VietnamWar50th.com. Bob talks to historian Nick Turse, the author of Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam, who noticed that the website’s version of the war seems stuck in the past, reasserting misinformation long since debunked by journalists, historians, and the government’s own Pentagon papers.

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Drone Law

Friday, February 21, 2014

A rash of state laws considered or passed in 2013 seek to rein in drone surveillance. They offer a patchwork of restrictions that seem to reflect the particular culture, or business interests, of individual states. Bob talks with Margot Kaminski, executive director of the Information Society Project and a lecturer at Yale Law School, who has surveyed the legal landscape and noticed a trend.

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Behind the Scandal of "Japan's Beethoven"

Friday, February 14, 2014

This week Japanese Olympic figure skater, Daisuke Takahashi, found himself in the midst of national scandal, through no fault of his own. Takahashi skated his short program to a piece of music that had been initially attributed to Mamoru Samuragochi, known as "Japan's Beethoven," who was recently revealed to be neither a composer, nor possibly even deaf. Bob talks with Roland Kelts, author of JapanAmerica, about the revelations and the Japanese media's reaction to them.

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The Media Shrugs, Again

Friday, February 14, 2014

Republican Congressman Jim Bridenstine was recently working a crowd of seniors in his Oklahoma district and complaining about President Obama, when a constituent raised her hand and called the president an "enemy combatant" who should be "executed." Congressman Bridenstine responded not by objecting to her statement, but rather by stoking the flames with his own angry anti-Obama rant. A video of the event was posted online, but triggered little attention. Bob ponders the ubiquity of vile, ignorant, and just plain crackpot speech among elected officials, and the extent to which the public, and the media, fail to care. 

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The (Not So) All-Knowing NSA

Friday, February 14, 2014

Last week the Washington Post reported that the NSA collects less than 30% of phone metadata, contrary to the popular perception that all call activity is being gathered en masse. As it turns out, the agency is unable to keep up with the explosion in cell phone use, which raises significant questions about the efficacy and potency of the program. Bob talks with Ellen Nakashima who wrote the story for the Washington Post.

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