Streams

Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield is the co-host of On the Media

Bob Garfield isn’t exactly a media whore, but he’s extremely promiscuous.

Apart from On the Media, Bob has been a columnist for 30-plus years, at the moment on the subjects of media and marketing for The Guardian and MediaPost. In the world of marketing he is an institution, like the Red Cross. Or San Quentin.

When not casting broadly, Bob casts podly, with former OTM producer Mike Vuolo on the insanely popular Slate language program “Lexicon Valley.” In print, Bob has been a contributing editor for the Washington Post Magazine, Civilization and the op-ed page of USA Today. He has also written for The New York Times, Playboy, Sports Illustrated, Atlantic and Wired and been employed variously by ABC, CBS, CNBC and the defunct FNN as an on-air analyst. As a lecturer and panelist, he has appeared in 37 countries on six continents, including such venues as the Kennedy Center, the U.S. Capitol, the Rainbow Room, the Smithsonian, Circus Circus casino, the Grand Ole Opry, the U.N., Harvard University, Princeton University and, memorably, a Thai Kickboxing ring in Cape Town, South Africa.

He is the author of five books, most recently Can’t Buy Me Like. His first book, Waking Up Screaming from the American Dream, was published by Scribner in 1997, favorably reviewed and quickly forgotten.  His 2003 manifesto on advertising, And Now a Few Words From Me, is published in six languages (although, admittedly, one is Bulgarian). His 2009 crackpot screed The Chaos Scenario, about the supposed collapse of mass media and advertising, has all come true. Garfield co-wrote “Tag, You’re It,” a snappy country song performed by Willie Nelson, and wrote an episode of the short-lived NBC sitcom “Sweet Surrender.” It sucked.

Shows:

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

The Guardian Scrapes the Bottom of the Comments Barrel

Friday, April 29, 2016

What The Guardian learned from sifting through the 70 million comments left on its site since 2006. 

The "Corrupt Bargain" That Started It All

Friday, April 29, 2016

Prior to 1824, the idea that the masses might not have much of a say in the selection of their president wasn't particularly controversial. One "corrupt bargain" changed all that.

Hillary and the Trolls

Friday, April 29, 2016

An FEC loophole allows super PACs to coordinate with campaigns if they aren't spending money. A pro-Clinton group is using that loophole to post comments online.

Another Confirmation Crisis

Friday, April 15, 2016

The Clarence Thomas hearings that riveted the country for 3 days in 1991 are being televised again in a dramatized form by HBO, at a similar time of political crisis over a nomination. 

NPR U OK?

Friday, April 15, 2016

Bob considers what the future might hold for NPR. 

Merkel's Free Speech Dilemma

Friday, April 15, 2016

It will come as no surprise that in Turkey, you can be jailed for insulting President Erdogan. What is shocking is that a critic of Erdogan could be charged with that crime in Germany.

A Global Newsroom Digs Through the Panama Papers

Friday, April 08, 2016

How did 400 journalists from nearly 80 countries go through the world's largest data leak? Very carefully.

The Counterintuitive Conspiracy of the Panama Papers

Friday, April 08, 2016

Conspiracy theorists are poring through the Panama Papers, but not for the reasons you might think. The revelations, many say, are just a distraction -- or targeted.

Behind the Panama Papers

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

How do you sort through 11.5 million documents in the world's largest whistleblower leak? Very carefully.
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'Momentum' By Any Other Name...

Friday, April 01, 2016

Every election, you hear a lot about a candidate having or losing "momentum." What does it mean? Almost anything, and therefore nothing.

Fighting FOIA With FOIA

Friday, April 01, 2016

A reporter uses FOIA to expose how Obama's self-proclaimed "most transparent administration in history" has tried to kill FOIA reform. 

The Posthumous Fame of Chantal Akerman

Friday, April 01, 2016

As a multi-city retrospective of late director Chantal Akerman's 40 plus films launches, can Akerman achieve in death the fame she hoped for in life? 

Cuba's Advertising Challenge

Friday, March 25, 2016

The Cuban constitution bans the use of media to promote capitalism. This means Cuban business owners have to get creative when it comes to advertising. 

The Paradox and Consequence of Declaring 'Genocide'

Friday, March 25, 2016

The US government has only used the word 'genocide' twice in response to an ongoing conflict, the most recent declaration was on March 17. It's a momentous act. But what does it mean?

The Dismantling of Press Freedoms in Turkey

Friday, March 25, 2016

A government crackdown on free speech has reached new depths in Turkey, with reporters muzzled and newspapers shuttered or seized by the government. 

Gawker, Hulk Hogan, and the First Amendment

Thursday, March 24, 2016

President and general counsel for Gawker, Heather Dietrick, discusses a Florida jury's $140 million judgement against the company for posting an excerpt of a Hulk Hogan's sex tape.
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A New Low for China's Press Freedoms?

Friday, March 18, 2016

China has not been known for a robust, independent press. But a crackdown from the government has made it official: state-run news outlets are now mouthpieces for the Communist Party. 

Who Are Trump Supporters?

Friday, March 18, 2016

Outright racists? The disaffected working class? Astute political subversives? The media struggles to explain the Trump insurgency. 

The Business of Books By the Foot

Friday, March 11, 2016

The Frederick, Maryland warehouse of Wonder Book is where unwanted used books go to find a second life--as decorative objects sold by the foot to fill empty bookshelves.

Why Is Amazon Opening Physical Bookstores?

Friday, March 11, 2016

In November 2015, Amazon opened a bookstore in Seattle, potentially the first of many. Could physical bookshops hold the key to the retailer's digital strategy?