Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield is the co-host of On the Media

Bob Garfield isn’t exactly a media whore, but he’s extremely promiscuous.

Apart from On the Media, Bob has been a columnist for 30-plus years, at the moment on the subjects of media and marketing for The Guardian and MediaPost. In the world of marketing he is an institution, like the Red Cross. Or San Quentin.

When not casting broadly, Bob casts podly, with former OTM producer Mike Vuolo on the insanely popular Slate language program “Lexicon Valley.” In print, Bob has been a contributing editor for the Washington Post Magazine, Civilization and the op-ed page of USA Today. He has also written for The New York Times, Playboy, Sports Illustrated, Atlantic and Wired and been employed variously by ABC, CBS, CNBC and the defunct FNN as an on-air analyst. As a lecturer and panelist, he has appeared in 37 countries on six continents, including such venues as the Kennedy Center, the U.S. Capitol, the Rainbow Room, the Smithsonian, Circus Circus casino, the Grand Ole Opry, the U.N., Harvard University, Princeton University and, memorably, a Thai Kickboxing ring in Cape Town, South Africa.

He is the author of five books, most recently Can’t Buy Me Like. His first book, Waking Up Screaming from the American Dream, was published by Scribner in 1997, favorably reviewed and quickly forgotten.  His 2003 manifesto on advertising, And Now a Few Words From Me, is published in six languages (although, admittedly, one is Bulgarian). His 2009 crackpot screed The Chaos Scenario, about the supposed collapse of mass media and advertising, has all come true. Garfield co-wrote “Tag, You’re It,” a snappy country song performed by Willie Nelson, and wrote an episode of the short-lived NBC sitcom “Sweet Surrender.” It sucked.

Shows:

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

When The Wall Is A Metaphor

Friday, April 28, 2017

A border wall was one of Trump's central campaign promises. But what does the intense focus on a barrier really achieve? We revisit a 2006 law to learn more.

The Problem With Federal Data on Hate Crimes

Friday, April 28, 2017

Most police departments claim that there are no hate crimes in their communities.

In Other Words

Friday, April 28, 2017

The symbolism of the border wall, a debate about the word "Jew," and our ongoing battle over reality. 

The Art of Winning a Pulitzer

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Iowa’s Storm Lake Times has a circulation of 3,330 and a staff of about 10, but it just won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing. Bob speaks with editor Art Cullen.
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Playing the "Madman"

Friday, April 21, 2017

"The Madman Theory" -- essentially appearing crazy -- was a foreign policy strategy for Nixon. Trump's approach is similar. And it may be working.

North Korea: How About Now?

Friday, April 21, 2017

Last month we assured you that the United States was not going to war with North Korea. With everything that happened this week, is that still the case?

After Bill O'Reilly: What's Next for Fox News

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Bob Garfield, co-host of WNYC’s On the Media, examines the future of Fox News without its biggest star.

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Closing the Blinds

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Gone are the days of "draining of swamp." From privatized visitor logs to mysterious Mar-A-Lago visitors, the first 100 days have not exactly been... transparent. 
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A Case for Law Enforcement

Friday, April 14, 2017

A journalist argues that drug treatment won't work without proper policing.

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Drugs Edition

Friday, April 14, 2017

The media coverage of drug abuse is often fraught with hyperbole and inaccuracy. We dispel some of the most common myths.

How the Press Gets Seduced By War

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

The media have responded to the Syria strike by sticking to the Washington line -- as per usual.
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FOIA Isn't Being Used the Way You Think It Is

Friday, March 31, 2017

A look at the businesses -- not journalists -- that use the Freedom of Information Act for their own profit.

Acquitting the Innocent: Beyond "Serial" and "Making a Murderer"

Friday, March 31, 2017

The "true crime" genre is undergoing a shift: from proving guilt to proving innocence. A new podcast looks at wrongful convictions.

Appalachia Beyond Coal

Friday, March 31, 2017

The coal industry is just a fraction of the Appalachian economy. So why do stereotypes about "coal country" persist? 

Where Your Data Will Go

Friday, March 31, 2017

The Trump administration is rolling back Obama-era protections. This week: a regulation on whether your internet service provider can sell your browsing history without asking.

The Man The Government Calls a 'FOIA Terrorist'

Friday, March 31, 2017

The NSA has made it nearly impossible for the public to access its internal reports. Jason Leopold wants to know why.

The Dark Money Group Backing Neil Gorsuch

Friday, March 24, 2017

A group spent millions on ads urging the Senate not to consider Merrick Garland. Now, they've spent millions more in Neil Gorsuch's favor.  

Section 702 Is In the Spotlight

Friday, March 24, 2017

New claims about surveillance at Trump Tower remind Congress that there's widespread, legal collection of Americans' conversations. And it can yield collateral damage.

Doing Diplomacy Without the Press

Friday, March 24, 2017

Rex Tillerson said he "doesn't need" the press to be an effective Secretary of State. He's probably wrong.

Should We Be Worried About North Korea, or Not?

Friday, March 24, 2017

Two North Korea experts sift through the saber-rattling and media frenzy to separate the bluster from the truly worrisome.