Streams

Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield is the co-host of On the Media

Bob Garfield isn’t exactly a media whore, but he’s extremely promiscuous.

Apart from On the Media, Bob has been a columnist for 30-plus years, at the moment on the subjects of media and marketing for The Guardian and MediaPost. In the world of marketing he is an institution, like the Red Cross. Or San Quentin.

When not casting broadly, Bob casts podly, with former OTM producer Mike Vuolo on the insanely popular Slate language program “Lexicon Valley.” In print, Bob has been a contributing editor for the Washington Post Magazine, Civilization and the op-ed page of USA Today. He has also written for The New York Times, Playboy, Sports Illustrated, Atlantic and Wired and been employed variously by ABC, CBS, CNBC and the defunct FNN as an on-air analyst. As a lecturer and panelist, he has appeared in 37 countries on six continents, including such venues as the Kennedy Center, the U.S. Capitol, the Rainbow Room, the Smithsonian, Circus Circus casino, the Grand Ole Opry, the U.N., Harvard University, Princeton University and, memorably, a Thai Kickboxing ring in Cape Town, South Africa.

He is the author of five books, most recently Can’t Buy Me Like. His first book, Waking Up Screaming from the American Dream, was published by Scribner in 1997, favorably reviewed and quickly forgotten.  His 2003 manifesto on advertising, And Now a Few Words From Me, is published in six languages (although, admittedly, one is Bulgarian). His 2009 crackpot screed The Chaos Scenario, about the supposed collapse of mass media and advertising, has all come true. Garfield co-wrote “Tag, You’re It,” a snappy country song performed by Willie Nelson, and wrote an episode of the short-lived NBC sitcom “Sweet Surrender.” It sucked.

Shows:

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Getting Clinical Trials On The Record

Friday, April 24, 2015

Clinical trials—where doctors test new medicines or treatments on humans—keeps medicine state-of-the-art. But too many trials don't publish their results, says Dr. Ben Goldacre.

Comments [2]

What Does a Body Good?

Friday, April 24, 2015

"Food Babe" Vani Hari has managed to get the "yoga mat" out of Subway sandwiches and the synthetic coloring out of Kraft's macaroni & cheese. But her logic might be flawed.  

Comments [5]

Watchdogs In Tuxedos

Friday, April 17, 2015

A week before the 2015 White House Correspondents' Dinner, Bob revisits his critical trip to last year's event.

Comments [6]

The Right to Record Police

Friday, April 17, 2015

While bystander cellphone videos can shed light on police misconduct, the right to film the cops is not always guaranteed. 

Comment

Washington's Nerds Go To Prom

Friday, April 17, 2015

Patrick's Gavin's new documentary, "Nerd Prom: Inside Washington's Wildest Week" is a behind-the-scenes look into the White House Correspondents Dinner.

Comments [1]

California's #DroughtShaming

Friday, April 10, 2015

In California, the search is on for who is most to blame for the drought. Neighbors report water waste using hashtags and apps, and finger-pointing has extended to national media.

Comments [1]

Climate Feedback

Friday, April 10, 2015

Scientist Emmanuel Vincent spearheads Climate Feedback, a group of scientists annotating climate change coverage online to bridge the gap between reportage and scientific fact. 

Comments [8]

The Guardian Takes A Stand

Friday, April 10, 2015

Alan Rusbridger talks about his last campaign as editor of The Guardian: getting the world's two largest charities to divest from fossil fuels - before it's too late.

Comments [2]

The Unreported Story, Part 2: Bias or Blind Spot

Friday, April 10, 2015

Chris Allbritton is one of the journalists who did cover the Colombian report. Bob speaks with Chris about the difficulty of covering this particular story.

Comment

The Unreported Story, Part 1: The Burden of Proof

Friday, April 10, 2015

Inspired by a listener query, Bob investigates an explosive set of claims from Colombia and tries to figure out why the American press has remained mostly silent.

Comments [8]

Rolling Stone's Fallout at UVA

Friday, April 10, 2015

Siva Vaidhyanathan, professor of media studies at the University of Virginia, tallies the damage done by the Rolling Stone story, "A Rape on Campus."

Comments [10]

Rolling Stone Still Won't Own its Mistake

Tuesday, April 07, 2015

The one surprising revelation to come out of Columbia's scathing report on Rolling Stone's UVA rape story, says Bob Garfield, is that the magazine still won't claim responsibility.

Comments [31]

Is True Crime Jinxed?

Friday, March 20, 2015

Following the sensational conclusion of HBO's true crime series, "The Jinx," Bob discusses the fine line between interpretation and manipulation in documentary film.

Comments [2]

Climate Ch...

Friday, March 20, 2015

Even as Florida is threatened by rising sea levels, Gov. Rick Scott's administration has reportedly banned officials from using the term “climate change” for state business.

Comments [11]

Uncorrected Rumors

Friday, March 20, 2015

Craig Silverman founded the website Emergent to track rumors in news media, and how the press deals with debunking them. The patterns are already emerging and they will make you sad.

Comments [4]

The Surveillance Stream

Friday, March 20, 2015

You've probably heard of the NSA's "Prism" program, which collects metadata. Wikimedia and other groups are now suing over a different surveillance apparatus called "upstream."

Comments [3]

Wikipedia's Jimmy Wales Vs. NSA

Friday, March 20, 2015

The Wikimedia Foundation is suing the NSA over its "upstream" spy program. Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales discusses the "chilling effect" he says surveillance has on its users. 

Comments [1]

Stephen Kim's Leak

Friday, March 20, 2015

Stephen Kim is in prison for speaking about a classified document with a reporter, but according to journalist Peter Maass the government threw the book at the wrong leaker. 

Comment

Internet Indoctrination

Friday, March 06, 2015

The unmasking of ISIS's "Jihadi John" has prompted questions about radicalization and how it happens to young people far from Syria.

Comments [1]

What Radio Can Teach The Internet

Friday, February 27, 2015

Net neutrality is a 21st century concern, but the policy debate that erupted between FCC chairs, business and citizens echoes an eerily similar fray— from 70 years ago.

Comments [1]