Streams

Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Pulp Non-Fiction

Friday, June 27, 2014

‘Tis the season to update those summer reading lists. If you’re in the mood for a certain kind of deep intrigue, you can always add some True Crimeyou know, the glossy paperbacks full of crime, punishment, and ordinary people behaving badly that decorate the supermarket checkout aisle. But don’t let those foil covers fool you, says Salon senior writer Laura Miller, much True Crime rises above mere pulp. Bob speaks to Miller about why she defends True Crime.

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Journalism In Jail

Friday, June 27, 2014

Amid international outcry, Egypt's judiciary sentenced three Al Jazeera journalists to between seven and ten years in jail on charges of aiding terrorists. Bob reflects on how suppression of a free press in Egypt may be reversing the course of the Arab Spring.

 

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Rethinking the Student Debt Crisis

Friday, June 27, 2014

It’s hard to escape the prevailing media narrative that student loan debt is destroying an entire generation’s financial future. The New York Times' David Leonhardt reported on a new Brookings Institution study on education debt, in an article titled “The Reality of Student Debt is Different from the Cliches”an assertion that cuts against conventional wisdom. Bob speaks to David Leonhardt to get to the bottom of what his reporting reveals about the state of student loan debt.

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Cellphone Searching, Tiny Antennas, and the High Court

Friday, June 27, 2014

This week, the Supreme Court ruled on two media technology cases, one that may save the bacon of Big Broadcast and Cable, and another that privacy advocates are heralding as a win. Bob talks with Slate's Dahlia Lithwick about the impact of these decisions.

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Your Guide to Court Decisions on Aereo and Cell-Phones

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

The Supreme Court ruled in a 6-3 decision that Aereo violates the Copyright Act–the ruling is seen as a major victory for television's biggest broadcasters.

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Intelligence Community Directive 119

Friday, June 13, 2014

Back in April, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence’s website quietly posted Intelligence Community Directive 119, whose implications could be devastating for journalists. Bob speaks to Steven Aftergood about what effect this directive could have on contact between intelligence officials and the press.

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Game Changer

Friday, June 13, 2014

Tetris, the world's most ubiquitous and probably most addictive video game, turned thirty this week. To celebrate, we revisit Bob's conversation with the creator of Tetris, Alexey Pajitnov, on the game's twenty-fifth anniversary back in 2009.

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A Cantor Narrative

Friday, June 13, 2014

The moment it became clear House Majority Leader Eric Cantor would suffer a shocking primary loss to David Brat, reporters began speculating about what the result would mean for Republican candidates across the country. Bob talks with North Star Opinion Research President Whit Ayers who says the media is once again extrapolating too much from too little.  

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The Privilege to Stay Silent

Friday, June 06, 2014

New York Times reporter James Risen is facing potential jail time for refusing orders from the government to divulge a confidential source, and the Supreme Court won’t intervene on his behalf. Bob talks with University of Chicago law professor Geoffrey Stone about what the situation means for the Obama administration and the press.

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“Climate Change” vs. “Global Warming”

Friday, June 06, 2014

The Environmental Protection Agency recently rolled out the Obama administration’s ambitious proposal to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants 30% by 2030. This proposal could bring renewed worldwide attention to climate change. Trouble is, we still haven’t sorted out how to talk about the issue. Is it “Climate Change” or “Global Warming”? Bob speaks to Anthony Leiserowitz, Director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, and the principal investigator of the new study, “What’s In a Name? Global Warming Versus Climate Change.”

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Data after Death

Friday, June 06, 2014

We don’t know for certain who owns our digital legacies after we die. A group of legal volunteers called the Uniform Law Commission is trying to sort this out with model legislation they call the Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act, or FADA. The goal is to give executors and other legal proxies access to files created by the deceased. Bob speaks to Suzanne Brown Walsh, attorney and chair of FADA, about the act.

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Everything You Need For a Narrative

Friday, May 30, 2014

Elliot Rodger, the 22-year-old who murdered 6 people in Isla Vista, California last week, left an enormous digital footprint - blog comments, YouTube videos and an online manifesto. Bob talks with Forbes staff writer Kashmir Hill about how all that information fed different narratives about what motivated Rodger.

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Amazon vs. Hachette

Friday, May 30, 2014

Amazon, the largest bookseller in the world, is locked in a struggle with Hachette, one of the biggest publishers. Amazon has prolonged shipping time, taken away the option to “pre-order” new releases, and eliminated the one-click option for purchasing Hachette books. And the feud has no end in sight. Bob talks to Brad Stone, author of The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon, about what it all means.

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One Rogue Reporter

Friday, May 30, 2014

Rich Peppiatt is a former tabloid reporter who resigned from the profession with a very public letter to his boss at the UK's Daily Star newspaper. He's since been a vocal critic of the British tabloid press, and has a new film called "One Rogue Reporter" that is part documentary, part satire, and part outrageous pranks against some of Britain's most notorious tabloid writers and editors. Bob speaks with Peppiatt about the film and how he turned tabloid journalists' own tricks against them.

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Digital Drama at the New York Times

Friday, May 23, 2014

The recently leaked New York Times innovation report reveals the paper's struggle to transition from print to digital on even the most basic level. Bob talks with Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard, about the applicability of the report's findings to the newspaper industry at large.

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Chinese Media's Perspective on Hacker Indictment

Friday, May 23, 2014

In an unprecedented move this week, the US Justice Department brought charges against 5 Chinese military officers for allegedly hacking American companies in an act of economic espionage. Bob speaks with Jeremy Goldkorn, who analyzes the Chinese media, about how the story is playing out in China.

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The Questions You Need to Ask About Any Health Story

Friday, May 23, 2014

Health news reporting is plagued by incredulity, false correlation, and general public confusion. Gary Schwitzer has devoted his life to reviewing how health news is reported, and, more often than not, mis-reported. Bob speaks to Schwitzer about his new study, “A Guide to Reading Health Care News Stories,” and the impact of bad health reporting.

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The "Department of Jokes"

Friday, May 16, 2014

The notion of using broad laws to suppress the arts has a long and horrifying tradition in Russia. Bob talks with comedian Yakov Smirnoff about performing in the Soviet Union, where comics had to submit jokes to a Department of Humor for approval.

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Covering the Nigerian Schoolgirl Kidnapping

Friday, May 16, 2014

Boko Haram's kidnapping of more than 250 Nigerian schoolgirls has received global attention thanks to a viral hashtag, #BringBackOurGirls, but violence by Boko Haram is nothing new in Nigeria. Bob talks with Nigerian journalist Alexis Okeowo, who has been covering the story for years, about the international media's sudden interest.

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Firing Jill Abramson

Friday, May 16, 2014

In a sudden move this week, The New York Times announced the firing of its executive editor Jill Abramson. Bob speaks with The New Yorker's Ken Auletta about why Abramson was fired.

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