Streams

Andy Lanset

Director of Archives, New York Public Radio

Andy Lanset appears in the following:

Commandments for Commentators

Monday, October 07, 2013

A biblical imperative for the newsy.
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Paderewski

Monday, September 30, 2013

"His every move in life personally, socially and economically was for the benefit and improvement of his fellow men."
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Latin Americans in Music

Monday, September 23, 2013

Latin America has a great contribution to make to the world's music.
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Brains Have No Sex

Monday, September 16, 2013

Pioneering feminist broadcaster on WQXR.
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So You Think It's Easy!

Monday, September 09, 2013

Tongue-twisters, mike fright, and other announcer woes.
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Earliest Known Recording of a New York City Mayor

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Who knew a commercial recording of a New York City Mayor would ever sell?
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Raymond Asserson, Sr., The Man Who Built WNYC in 1924: Speaking Truth to Power

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

As New York City's Broadcasting Supervisor, Raymond Asserson was charged with designing and building the first WNYC facility by then Commissioner for Plant and Structures, Grover A. Whalen. Generally behind the scenes in bringing WNYC to life, Asserson made his mark publicly before the House Merchant Marine Committee on March 12, 1924. Testifying on behalf of Whalen, the former Navy engineer charged that through its patents, AT&T had stymied New York City's efforts to set up a radio station and had effectively created a radio monopoly.

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Radio Pioneer Tommy Cowan Announces a Parade of History

Friday, May 10, 2013

He was an announcer blessed with the gift of gab and an encyclopedic knowledge of New York.
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In Wartime '40s, America's First Taste of Rationing

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

WNYC

During World War II, rationing became not only accepted, but a symbol of patriotism for most Americans. Listen to Oscar Brand in this never-broadcast documentary on how the government —and WNYC— helped foster that sentiment.

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Holocaust Remembrance Day

Sunday, April 07, 2013

It is April 19th, 1944. Thousands of mourners silently march from a service at the Warsaw synagogue on Rivington Street to City Hall.  A few carry signs: "Save Those Jews in Poland Who Can Yet Be Saved!" and, "Three Million Polish Jews Have Been Murdered By the Nazis!"  When they arrive at the steps of City Hall, Cantor Moishe Oysher sings El Mole Rachamim, a funeral prayer for the the 40,000 Jews who died a year earlier in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising.

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Earliest Known Broadcast on Nazi Persecution of Jews

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

A rare recording surfaces!
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Ms. Bella Abzug

Monday, March 18, 2013

In March, 1972, reporter Eleanor Fischer interviewed Congresswoman Bella Abzug as she was fighting to hold on to her congressional district in Manhattan encompassing, in part, the Battery, the Lower East Side, Little Italy, Chinatown, Greenwich Village and Chelsea. Representative Abzug talks about this effort to marginalize her. She also calls for pulling U.S. troops out of Vietnam, endorses Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm's campaign for the Presidency and (there may be some debate over it) lays claim to starting the honorific "Ms."

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Marcus Garvey: 20th Century Pan-Africanist

Friday, February 15, 2013

He had six million followers at one time
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Scottsboro: A Civil Rights Milestone

Friday, February 01, 2013

Scottsboro: A Civil Rights Milestone
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Previously Unreleased Interviews with The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

In 1961, a radio reporter named Eleanor Fischer spoke to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for a CBC called Project 62. As far as we know, these unedited interviews have never been presented in their entirety until now.

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David Durk's Moving Testimony Before the Knapp Commission

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

David Durk, the New York police detective who teamed up with officer Frank Serpico to breach the aptly named 'blue wall of silence' died yesterday. His testimony before the Knapp Commission investigation into police corruption in 1971 made for some of the most moving public testimony ever broadcast.  Writing in The New York Times Book Review, WNYC Director Mary Perot Nichols said it was largely thanks to Durk's persistence and contacts that their campaign against police corruption became a matter of public record. Above is an excerpt from his remarks on December 21, 1971.

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The Marine Corps General Who Called War 'A Racket'

Sunday, November 11, 2012

"I was a racketeer for capitalism."
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Pioneering Language Classes Over WNYC

Friday, September 14, 2012

Between the summer of 1925 and spring 1932, Victor Harrison-Berlitz, the General Manager of 410 U.S. Berlitz language schools, taught French, Spanish, German and Italian over WNYC. The regular classes were a pioneering effort for American radio.

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Macklin Marrow and the WNYC Concert Orchestra

Friday, August 03, 2012

When WNYC had a concert orchestra, this man lead the way.
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Morris S. Novik: Public Radio Pioneer

Friday, July 13, 2012

Morris S. Novik was appointed by Mayor F. H. La Guardia to be the first Director of the Municipal Broadcasting System on February 9, 1938. During the nearly eight years he oversaw WNYC, he tirelessly worked to make the station an innovative and model public broadcaster. In fact, Novik laid claim to coining the phrase "public broadcasting" while at WNYC.

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