Streams

Andy Lanset

Director of Archives, New York Public Radio

Andy Lanset appears in the following:

WNYC and the Land of Mu

Friday, January 13, 2012

A cult classic airs on WNYC.
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On the Eve of New Year's Eve 1924

Friday, December 30, 2011

On December 30, 1924, The New York Times radio listings* for WNYC included a remote broadcast from the Newspaper Club of New York. It was a children's Christmas party for the sons and daughters of newspaper men. The entertainment line-up included Marilyn Miller, the Duncan Sisters, The Singer Midgets, George Haas and his singing canaries, Betty Bronson, Toto, Bob Miller, Gedney and Magee, Winifred Toomey, Rachel Mastrota, Richard B. Gilbert, Sam Wooding's Orchestra and Teddy, the baby elephant. Who were they? Let's find out.

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WNYC Promotes Health and Wellness with Olympian Joe Ruddy

Friday, December 23, 2011

Keeping Fit was a regular series of  health and exercise talks by Joe Ruddy on WNYC in 1926.
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Cartoonist and Sports Writer Thornton Fisher, WNYC Sports Commentator 1924-1925

Friday, December 16, 2011

Thornton Fisher (1888-1975) began his broadcasting career in 1923 at AT&T's WEAF in New York as one of radio's earliest sports commentators. He switched to WNYC the following year, not long after the municipal station began broadcasting. The Evening Leader of Corning, New York  praised Fisher's Tuesday and Thursday evening program, Sports Analysis, and said, "he is one of the keenest sports writers and cartoonists in the world of journalism. His love for all sports, coupled with his sparkling wit and understanding of every phase of every game, have created an immortal place for him as chronicler of the progress of sports."[1]

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The Five Locust Sisters Perform on WNYC

Friday, December 09, 2011

On December 9, 1926, the Locust Sisters sang popular tunes in our studio. The  Locust Sisters were a singing quartet with a fifth sister, Mathilda, on the piano. Known as the "miracle makers of harmony," they were featured as missionaries in the 1927 Vincent Youmans Broadway musical Hit the Deck. Reviewing the performance in The New York Times, Brook Atkinson wrote, "the thin harmonies of the four Locust Sisters, admirably introduced, are artless and delightful."  They also appeared in a five-minute movie short in 1928, the first of their two appearances for MGM Metro Movietone Revue. The sisters also briefly recorded for Columbia Records. Watch and listen to them in their 1930 MGM short at: LOCUST SISTERS. 

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First Jewish Daily Forward Radio Program is on WNYC

Friday, November 04, 2011

WNYC
Believe it or not, it happened on WNYC, not WEVD!
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Frankfurt School Theorist on WNYC in 1940

Friday, October 28, 2011

Mayor La Guardia puts an end to critical theorist's music show.
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WNYC QSL CARDS

Friday, September 30, 2011

Are you a DXer?
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WNYC 9/11/2001

Friday, September 09, 2011

A transcript from our September, 11, 2001 airchecks.
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WNYC's New AM Transmitter, 1937

Friday, September 02, 2011

Halloween, 1937: WNYC new WPA-built transmitter comes on line. It has a micro-ray system, the only one in use outside of the Vatican."
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Berlin 1961

Friday, September 02, 2011

In this 1965 Overseas Press Club Luncheon, Hallie Burnett, novelist and publisher, describes her experience in Berlin in August, 1961. On assignment for Reader’s Digest, Burnett was charged with reporting on the conditions of the East German refugees, who were “coming over at that time at about 2,000 a night.” Amidst a quiet week, she describes the night of August 13 when the foundations for the Berlin wall were laid. She describes standing among Berliners at the Brandenburg Gate, who were so shocked they had not yet found their voices to protest.

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Leadbelly and Lomax Together at the American Music Festival

Friday, August 19, 2011

It's always exciting when we turn up an important long lost recording.  In this case, the unlabeled flip side of one of Mayor La Guardia's talks had half-a-show that's not been heard for 67 years. Hailing from February 14th, 1944, we hear two friends get together to share some music with each other and WNYC's listeners. And what better venue than the station's annual American Music Festival, eleven days of studio performances and concerts around the city dedicated to home-grown music and talent?  Talent indeed. Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Leadbelly, a renowned folksinger and bluesman, performed with pioneering folklorist Alan Lomax.

 

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Kurt Vonnegut: WNYC Reporter on the Afterlife

Friday, August 05, 2011

An opportunity to catch Vonnegut's keen observational skills as a reporter from a distant place, where neither before, nor since, WNYC has had a stringer.  
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News + Drama = Early Radio Newsreel

Monday, July 25, 2011

Dramatization of the news started long before television!

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WNYC: 87 Years and the Romance of Radio

Friday, July 08, 2011

A Spanish garden at the Municipal Building
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Do You Have What It Takes to Be a WNYC Announcer in 1938 or 1948?

Friday, July 01, 2011

WNYC
Surprise Yourself. Take the Test!
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Woody Guthrie and WNYC

Friday, June 24, 2011

He was a regular guest on Leadbelly's show and sang the station's praises.
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Edward Tatnall Canby: Reviewer, Critic, Audiophile, Conductor, Teacher & Host

Friday, June 17, 2011

A reviewer's reviewer.
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Intrepid City College Staffers Record Dust Bowl Refugees for WNYC Documentary

Friday, June 10, 2011

You could call them Lomax juniors.
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David Randolph: The Father of Weekly Thematic Music Programming

Friday, June 03, 2011

His weekly show aired for 33 years on WNYC.
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