Sarah Gonzalez

Reporter, WNYC/NJPR

Sarah Aida Gonzalez was the youth and families reporter at WNYC. She dug deep into data and documents to reveal systemic inequalities in New Jersey’s foster care system, and into how the state prosecutes minors and disciplines federal immigration detainees

Sarah received the 2017 Daniel Schorr Prize, awarded to a public radio reporter under age 35, and was named a finalist for the 2017 Livingston Awards for young journalists. Her investigative and feature reporting has received a national Edward R. Murrow award, and national awards from PRNDI, The Society of Professional Journalists and the Education Writer’s Association. Her investigation into Florida charter schools turning away students with severe disabilities received an Online News Association award for Innovative Investigative Journalism.

Sarah graduated from Mills College in Oakland, CA in 2009. She grew up on the San Diego/Tijuana, Mexico border.

Shows:

Sarah Gonzalez appears in the following:

Episode 869: The Student Loan Whistleblower

Friday, October 12, 2018

Seth Frotman worked overseeing student loans for the government. He saw things that made him quit.

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Community Health Workers and Churches Band Together After Florence

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

We talk to a director at a community health center in North Carolina, about how elderly residents and those with limited resources, have been coping after Hurricane Florence.

Trump's Trade War with China Hits a Fever Pitch

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

President Trump's escalating trade war with China ratcheted up another notch this week.

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After Political Backlash, Pakistani PM Khan Walks Back Citizenship Pledge for Afghan Refugees

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan offered citizenship to Afghan refugees but the ensuing backlash forced him to walk back the pledge. We explore what it signals about their future.

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Can There Be Redemption for the Accused in the #MeToo Movement?

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

On Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, one rabbi explains what the Jewish faith can teach men trying to redeem themselves following allegations of sexual misconduct.

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Hurricane Florence Heightens Environmental Risks in North Carolina

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

In the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, we explore the heightened environmental risks that North Carolina residents are facing. 

Democratic Districts Under Scrutiny for Lucrative ICE Contracts

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Left-leaning counties in New Jersey rely on millions of dollars from ICE to maintain the county's jails. 

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As Detroit Schools Shut Down Water Over Lead Concerns, Contamination Points to a National Crisis

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Days before Detroit's public schools opened for the school year, drinking water was shut off district-wide when test results showed elevated lead and copper levels.

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Sexual Assault Allegation Against Brett Kavanaugh Could Derail Confirmation Process

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

We get the latest on how a sexual assault allegation could impact the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh and hear from listeners on how they feel about the accusation.

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Thousands of Prisoners Left Out of Obama's Effort to Soften Unfair Drug Laws

Monday, September 17, 2018

While some eventually did have their sentences commuted or reduced others were denied. We take a look at the clemency initiative and who was left behind. 

Emergency Response Efforts Remain Critical as Florence Continues to Damage Carolinas

Monday, September 17, 2018

Although it was downgraded from a hurricane over the weekend, Florence is still inflicting heavy rainfalls on the Carolinas. At least fifteen people have been reported dead. 

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Dozens Dead After Typhoon Mangkhut Tears Through Philippines and Hong Kong

Monday, September 17, 2018

Over the weekend, as Hurricane Florence was making its way through the Carolinas, Typhoon Mangkhut killed dozens in the Philippines before pummeling Hong Kong. 

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Poll: Majority of Americans Support Diversity in Higher Education, Oppose Affirmative Action

Monday, September 17, 2018

A new survey finds that the majority of Americans disagree with the Supreme Court's ruling to uphold affirmative action. But most still say that they value diversity on college campuses.

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Episode 861: Food Scare Squad

Friday, August 24, 2018

When food makes people sick all around the country, an army of germ detectives jumps into action.

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Episode 859: You Asked For Even More

Friday, August 10, 2018

You have a lot of questions... about tariffs, unemployment rates, and RV dealerships, to name a few. We have answers.

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Why Trading Venezuelan Bolivar For U.S. Dollars Is Dangerous

Friday, August 10, 2018

Venezuela's currency is losing value so quickly, residents are trying to trade it for anything else, like sacks of sugar. We meet a woman who helped citizens access U.S. dollars. Now she's on the run.

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Episode 858: Venezuela's Fugitive Money Traders

Friday, August 03, 2018

The Venezuelan government doesn't want you to know the real value of its currency. But Ruben and Mila figured it out. Now they're on the lam.

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Episode 853: Peak Sand

Friday, July 13, 2018

Sand. It's in buildings, windows, your cell phone. But there isn't enough in the world for everyone. And that's created a dangerous black market.

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How Universities And Businesses Are Trying To Engineer More Accidental Genius

Friday, July 13, 2018

Some of the greatest discoveries in the world have been totally random and happened by accident. Penicillin, X-ray images, the smoke detector, popsicles. Now, universities and businesses are trying to see if they can create the conditions for the next great accident.

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Episode 847: Inventing Accidents

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

The medical world has been trying to cure color blindness for centuries. Then a glass scientist figured it out. By accident.

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