Nina Totenberg

NPR legal correspondent

Nina Totenberg appears in the following:

Can Trump Pardon Himself?

Saturday, January 09, 2021

While some constitutional scholars argue that the pardon power is absolute, most believe a president cannot pardon himself.

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Can Trump Pardon Himself?

Friday, January 08, 2021

President Trump reportedly is said to be considering pardoning himself before he leaves office. NPR discusses whether there is a legal rationale for such a move.

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Chief Justice Roberts' Annual Report Focuses On COVID, Skips Trump And Controversy

Thursday, December 31, 2020

In his report on the federal judiciary, the chief justice looks at all the ways federal courts remained open this year, comparing it to how courts handled other pandemics.

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Supreme Court's New Supermajority: What It Means For Roe v. Wade

Thursday, December 31, 2020

There are two schools of thought: either the right to abortion will be systemically hollowed out, leaving it a right on paper only, or Roe will be overturned.

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Religion, Abortion, Guns And Race. Just The Start Of A New Supreme Court Menu

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Conservatives now have a 6-to-3 majority — a vote to spare on any given issue. Experts expect the new majority to move aggressively on an agenda more conservative than any seen since the 1930s.

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'Already Behind': Diversifying The Legal Profession Starts Before The LSAT

Tuesday, December 22, 2020

With the percentage of Black lawyers stagnant over the last 10 years and clients demanding more diverse lawyers, a lot needs to be done to diversify a profession that is 86% white.

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Supreme Court Dodges Trump's Plan To Exclude Undocumented Immigrants From Census

Friday, December 18, 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court dodged a direct ruling on President Trump's plan to exclude undocumented immigrants from a census count used to allocate congressional districts to states.

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Supreme Court Punts Census Case, Giving Trump An Iffy Chance To Alter Numbers

Friday, December 18, 2020

The opinion said the case was "riddled with contingencies and speculation" that impede judicial review. The president has sought to use a census count that does not include undocumented immigrants.

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Supreme Court And Big-Time College Sports Meet For Potentially Big-Time Decision

Wednesday, December 16, 2020

The commercialization of big-time college sports has led to questions about whether the players are employees or student athletes.

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Supreme Court To Hear Case Over NCAA's Limits On Compensation For Student Athletes

Wednesday, December 16, 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday said it would take up an appeal from the NCAA defending its rules that impose certain restrictions on paying college athletes.

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Supreme Court Rejects Texas' Lawsuit Over Election Results

Friday, December 11, 2020

The Supreme Court has rejected a lawsuit brought by Republican-led states alleging election fraud, ending one of the last legal challenges to the 2020 presidential election.

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Supreme Court Shuts Door On Texas Suit Seeking To Overturn Election

Friday, December 11, 2020

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton sued four states that Joe Biden won, claiming their changes to election procedures during the pandemic violated federal law.

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Supreme Court Says Muslim Men Can Sue FBI Agents In No-Fly List Case

Thursday, December 10, 2020

The case – Tanzin v. Tanvir — involved three Muslim men who said their religious freedom rights were violated when FBI agents tried to use the no-fly list to force them into becoming informants.

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Trump Asks Supreme Court To Let Him Join Widely Scorned Texas Election Lawsuit

Wednesday, December 09, 2020

The suit, viewed by election experts as a baseless Hail Mary attempt to get the justices to invalidate Joe Biden's victory, has little to no chance of success.

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Looted Nazi Art Again Before Supreme Court

Monday, December 07, 2020

In 2004 it was the famous "Woman In Gold" painting by Gustav Klimt. Now it is the Guelph Treasure. Both were owned by Jews and expropriated by the Nazis.

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Supreme Court Hears Arguments On Medieval Art Collection That Was Sold To Nazis

Monday, December 07, 2020

The Supreme Court heard arguments on Monday in a case that involves a rare collection of medieval art Jewish art dealers were forced to sell to the Nazis in 1935.

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Supreme Court Weighs Whether All Non-Unanimous Jury Verdicts Are Unconstitutional

Wednesday, December 02, 2020

In April the justices said future split verdicts in criminal trials are unconstitutional. Now the question is what about such verdicts in the past — potentially several thousand of them.

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Justices Doubt Trump Plan To Exclude Some Immigrants From Census

Tuesday, December 01, 2020

U.S. Supreme Court justices expressed doubts about a plan to cut undocumented immigrants from a key census count — one that would exclude them for purposes of drawing new congressional districts.

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Supreme Court Looks For Ways To Wait Out Trump On Key Census Question

Monday, November 30, 2020

Justices expressed doubts about a plan to cut undocumented immigrants from a key census count — one that would exclude them for purposes of drawing new congressional districts.

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Can Trump Change A Key Census Count? Supreme Court Hears His Claim

Monday, November 30, 2020

The Constitution says that for reallocating House seats, the census must count the "whole number of persons" in each state. But President Trump wants to subtract undocumented immigrants.

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