Jami Floyd

Host of "All Things Considered" & Legal Editor | WNYC News

Jami Floyd is the local host of “All Things Considered,” which airs from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. weekdays. She is also the Legal Editor in the WNYC Newsroom. You can follow her on Twitter @jamifloyd.

Jami was born and raised in New York City and grew up listening to WNYC. She has been a news junkie ever since childhood, when she delivered newscasts for her grandmother from the dining room table. She went on to serve as editor-in-chief of her high school newspaper, ombudsperson for the college newspaper and DJ for WHRW, the campus radio station at Binghamton University (S.U.N.Y.). At Berkeley Law School, she was selected as an associate editor of the California Law Review, where she also published.

In a journalism career that spans two decades, Jami has worked on everything from breaking news, to exclusive interviews, to long-form investigations. Her broadcast career began while teaching law at Stanford Law School, when she was invited to appear on a prime time ABC special, "The Trouble with Lawyers." Following that appearance, she served as a legal analyst for KPIX Radio in San Francisco during the OJ Simpson murder trial. Jami then moved from law teaching to reporting for CBS News in New York and, in 1998, moved over to ABC News. There, she served for nearly a decade in various capacities, including Law & Justice Correspondent. In that role, Jami covered a range of issues such as the innocence movement, civil rights, the U.S. Supreme Court, the contested 2000 presidential election, and the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

In 2006, she launched her show at Court TV, “Jami Floyd: Best Defense,” a daily legal and political talk show, which enjoyed a five-year run. Over the years, she has appeared as an analyst on many news outlets including CNN, Fox News, NBC, MSNBC, and PBS.

Jami has won numerous awards, including the Gracie, two Tellys, the Maggie and two Cine-Golden Eagle Awards for journalism. She was twice nominated for an TV News Emmy, once in 1999 for her coverage of the John Kennedy, Jr., plane crash and again in 2001, for her work at Ground Zero.  In September 2015, she was named a Public Scholar by the New York Council for the Humanities, for a two year term.

In the course of her career, Jami has had the opportunity to travel to 48 states, and countless in-depth conversations with news makers. Among the most memorable: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, and former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, cited by The New York Times for its barrage of "hard-hitting" questions. Jami still considers her interview with Myrlie Evers-Williams, widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers to be her most meaningful.

Jami Floyd appears in the following:

Judge Says Thousands Of Primary Ballots Missing Postmarks Must Be Counted While Board Plans Appeal

Tuesday, August 04, 2020

The New York City Board of Elections certified the results of the June 23 primary Tuesday. 

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NYC's Health Commissioner Oxiris Barbot Resigns

Tuesday, August 04, 2020

In a message to her staff she said that the health department would have to work closely with other agencies to prepare for an "inevitable second wave."

Comment

Weekly Music Roundup: Galya Bisengalieva, Run the Jewels, and Mike Block's Global Crew

Monday, August 03, 2020

New Sounds
Week of Aug 3: This week, music for an ecological catastrophe by Galya Bisengalieva; a global cast joins cellist Mike Block; and Run The Jewels return a favor.
Read More

Comment

Why New York City's Census Director Says Ending Door Knocking Early Will Be "Disastrous"

Friday, July 31, 2020

Census workers and advocates say this will result in a massive undercount, especially for immigrants and communities of color.

Comment

Cringing Our Way Through 'Indian Matchmaking'

Thursday, July 30, 2020

What the Netflix series that is on everyone's lips gets right — and so wrong.

Comment

Weekly Music Roundup: Taylor Swift, Ala.Ni, and Cinder Well

Monday, July 27, 2020

New Sounds
Week of July 27: This week, Taylor Swift’s surprising new album Folklore; captivating singer Ala.Ni’s lament for Emmett Till; and doom-folk from Irish-based artist Cinder Well.
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Comment

The Heartbeat of New York City: Pulse Checking The Culture Economy

Friday, July 24, 2020

WNYC
New York City's arts and culture scene is struggling due to the pandemic, and the economic future is bleak. 

Comment

Baseball Is Back...With Cardboard Fans & Laughtracks

Thursday, July 23, 2020

WNYC
New York's first home baseball game in a shortened, COVID-restricted season is Friday at Citi Field between The Mets and the Braves.

Comment

The Docket: Can The Federal Government Send Troops Into Cities?

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

A legal scholar says while the federal government has the right to send troops to cities and states to protect its interests, the issue is what the troops are doing.

Comment

How Asian American Communities Are Confronting Their Complicated History With Black Americans

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Many Asian Americans using this moment to call out anti-Blackness in their own communities.

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What Police Reform Looks Like Six Years After Eric Garner's Killing

Friday, July 17, 2020

WNYC
Six years ago Eric Garner was killed by an NYPD officer, who was later fired but never charged. Protesters are still taking to the streets. 

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Trump's New Campaign Manager Has Bridgegate Roots

Thursday, July 16, 2020

President Trump is turning to Bill Stepien — a former Chris Christie aide who, after being fired in the wake of the Bridgegate scandal, grew close to Jared Kushner.

Comment

Health Activism And the Legacy Of The Young Lords

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

WNYC
On July 14, 1970, the Young Lords occupied the Lincoln Medical Center in the South Bronx, known locally as "The Butcher Shop," in order to turn it into a hospital for the people. 

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Growing Blue Lives Matter Marches Devolve into Street Brawls with Counter Protesters

Monday, July 13, 2020

Blue Lives Matter protests in support of the police are turning out in increasingly large numbers.

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Director Saheem Ali Explains Why Shakespeare Is For Everyone

Monday, July 13, 2020

Director Saheem Ali explains why his WNYC and Public Theater co-production of Richard II centers on Black, indigenous and people of color.

Comments [3]

Weekly Music Roundup: Lisel, Bab L’ Bluz, and Samora Pinderhughes

Monday, July 13, 2020

New Sounds
This week, a quiet song of protest from Samora Pinderhughes, a noisy song from quarantine by Lisel, and an ode to the NYC subways from Max Richter. Plus, Moroccan trance by Bab L' Bluz.
Read More

Comment

Black Botanists Work Towards Gaining More Visibility

Friday, July 10, 2020

WNYC
 After the racist encounter between a Black birder and a white woman, conversations among Black botanists manifested as an awareness campaign. 

Comments [1]

Carrie Mae Weems' Newest Project Examines The Disproportionate Impact Of COVID-19 On Black Americans

Friday, July 10, 2020

Few artists have examined race with as clear an eye as Carrie Mae Weems. 

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Will The Supreme Court's Rulings Force Trump's Tax Returns To Be Made Public?

Thursday, July 09, 2020

The Supreme Court delivered a loss to President Trump and his quest to shield his tax returns. But don't expect the unveiling of the president's financial documents anytime soon.

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All The President's Tax Returns

Thursday, July 09, 2020

Find out what both of the Supreme Court's ruling on President Trump's tax returns and financial records could mean for him and what will be done moving forward.