Christopher Werth

Senior Editor, WNYC Narrative Unit

Christopher Werth is a senior editor in WNYC’s Narrative Unit. Prior to that, he worked as editor/senior producer of The Daily at The New York Times and senior producer at Freakonomics Radio. He spent eight years as a public-radio reporter in London, reporting for NPR, Marketplace, Newsweek, The Los Angeles Times and the BBC World Service.

Christopher Werth appears in the following:

Zoned for Resistance

Friday, July 10, 2020

Chicago’s Little Village has been hit hard by COVID-19, but after a botched demolition left it coated in dust, one lifelong activist and her community are standing together while apart.

Rage, Grief, Joy

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Something has been pushed to the surface that can no longer be repressed. And it’s transforming everything— from what we tolerate politically to how we mourn those we’ve lost.

DOE Faces Potential $10 Million Lawsuit Over Lead-Poisoned Child

Friday, June 05, 2020

A mother claims her toddler daughter was poisoned in a 3-K program in Brooklyn.

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Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

Thursday, June 04, 2020

What if we release prisoners with no one to help them? We follow a psychiatrist and social worker as they try to find and support mentally ill inmates being released during a pandemic.

Inside the Prison Pandemic

Friday, May 01, 2020

There are roughly 2.3 million people in jails and prisons. They can’t socially distance. They can barely wash their hands. So now what?

Why Covid-19 Is Killing Black People

Friday, April 24, 2020

The pandemic has hit black communities uniquely hard. To understand why, we explore how racism shows up in black bodies — all the way down to the cellular level.

A History of Style in a Pandemic

Wednesday, April 08, 2020

Here’s how black women in Chicago used lace and jewels to turn their mandatory face masks into works of art, more than 100 years ago.

Dispatches from People Stranded in Place

Friday, April 03, 2020

From the homeless in San Francisco to immigration detention centers, here's how the response to Covid-19 is undermined by choices that have little to do with healthcare.

Keep Calm and Check Your Bias

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Research shows that racism and other prejudices are most acute when the stakes are high, so Kai talks with Dr. Gail Christopher about how to control for that reality, during a pandemic.

Last Chance at Justice

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Salah Hasan Nusaif al-Ejaili knows the atrocities that can be committed during a time of crisis. Seventeen years after the American invasion of Iraq, he's still trying to get justice.

Fragility in Liberty

Thursday, February 20, 2020

We travel from Liberty Island to U.S.-Mexico border to discover how the end of Reconstruction and America's present-day immigration crisis are inextricably bound.

Can NYC Ever Be Lead Free?

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Despite laws on the books for landlords to check apartments for lead and respond to complaints, 3,866 children still tested positive for lead last year.

For Years, New York City Failed To Inspect Schools For Lead Paint

Thursday, February 06, 2020

WNYC/Gothamist obtained data showing a lack of records dating to 2015.

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Two Schools in Marin County

Thursday, February 06, 2020

In the classrooms and town meetings of Marin, California we witness a community grappling with what desegregation and reparations might look like in the 21st century.

A Dozen Misidentified Classrooms Highlight Wider Concerns Over School Inspections for Lead Paint

Thursday, December 12, 2019

Students were removed from 12 classrooms with peeling lead paint, highlighting wider concerns about the Department of Education's inspection protocols.

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Denial at the Trump Hotel

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Climate change skeptics are finding it harder to deny the Earth is warming. So what's their plan now?

City Says Lead-Contaminated Classrooms Will Be Cleaned up Before New School Year

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Kathryn Garcia, Senior Advisor for Citywide Lead Prevention, says the DOE plans to be transparent about the clean up so parents can have "confidence in sending their kids to school."

A History of Persuasion: Part 3

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Silicon Valley’s “millionaire maker” is a behavioral scientist who harnessed the power of persuasion in a booming tech industry. But it might not be too big to rein in.

A History of Persuasion: Part 2

Thursday, August 08, 2019

Ted Kaczynski had been a boy genius. James McConnell’s ideas about psychology sparked almost as much anxiety as Facebook does today. Here’s how their paths crossed.

A History of Persuasion: Part 1

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

A once-famous psychologist... and how the Unabomber tried to kill him. It's the first episode in our three-part series examining the science of persuasion, technology, and its backlash.