Carrie Johnson

National Security Correspondent for the Washington Post

Carrie Johnson appears in the following:

Justice Department charges Steve Bannon with criminal contempt of Congress

Friday, November 12, 2021

Federal prosecutors charged Steve Bannon over his defiance of a subpoena from the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol siege.

Comment

The Justice Department has charged 2 hackers for major ransomware attacks

Monday, November 08, 2021

The Justice Department has announced charges against two foreign-born hackers who were involved in major ransomware attacks. They allegedly targeted hospitals, schools and local governments in Texas.

Comment

U.S. indicts 2 men behind major ransomware attacks

Monday, November 08, 2021

The attacks shut down a meat processing plant and an internet software provider earlier this year.

Comment

Federal watchdogs want more power to investigate wrongdoing within the government

Friday, November 05, 2021

Inspectors general are asking Congress for more job protections and the power to subpoena people for testimony in what they call an effort at greater accountability in government.

Comment

The Supreme Court will hear a gun-rights case dealing with the Second Amendment

Wednesday, November 03, 2021

The Supreme Court hears a case that could decide whether people can carry concealed guns into airports, churches, schools, and shopping centers — without a special license.

Comment

After prison he followed the rules, but a parole mishap delayed his full freedom

Thursday, October 28, 2021

Robert Davis' experience with the U.S. Parole Commission is an example of how systemic barriers can hold down people striving to do the right thing.

Comment

A proposed Biden drug policy could widen racial disparities, civil rights groups warn

Friday, October 22, 2021

A coalition of civil rights and criminal justice reform groups said a White House proposal for restricting synthetic drugs related to fentanyl will not curb the overdose epidemic.

Comment

Garland deflects lawmakers' questions on Trump as he tries to sidestep politics

Thursday, October 21, 2021

Attorney General Merrick Garland told lawmakers he's working to keep the Justice Department out of politics after four years of chaos during the Trump presidency.

Comment

Fired FBI official Andrew McCabe wins retirement benefits and back pay in settlement

Thursday, October 14, 2021

The Trump administration fired former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe on the eve of his retirement in 2018. McCabe then sued over his termination.

Comment

Enforcement of the new abortion law in Texas is blocked by a federal judge

Thursday, October 07, 2021

A federal judge has blocked the state's controversial abortion law, finding it was designed to make it difficult for people to exercise their constitutional rights. Texas will appeal.

Comment

DOJ will revisit decision not to charge FBI agents in failed Nassar case

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

The Justice Department is reviewing an earlier decision not to prosecute two former FBI agents who allegedly lied about the investigation into disgraced gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar.

Comment

The FBI mishandled Larry Nassar's case. Now the DOJ is focusing on victim support

Friday, October 01, 2021

The Justice Department on Friday outlined a broad new push to support crime victims, including coordinating with state and local authorities in cases where federal charges won't be brought.

Comment

Texas' abortion law is back in court

Friday, October 01, 2021

A federal judge will decide whether to block Texas' new restrictive abortion law after hearing from Justice Department attorneys and lawyers for the state. He offered no timetable for a decision.

Comment

More Than 800 People Have Been Arrested As The DOJ Clamps Down On Fake Pills

Thursday, September 30, 2021

Authorities said they recovered 1.8 million counterfeit pills laced with enough fentanyl to kill 700,000 Americans. "One pill can kill," Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco said Thursday.

Comment

John Hinckley Jr., Who Shot Ronald Reagan, Will Be Unconditionally Released In 2022

Monday, September 27, 2021

John Hinckley Jr., who wounded then President Reagan and three others in a failed assassination attempt in 1981, will win unconditional release next year as part of a court settlement.

Comment

John Hinckley, Who Shot President Reagan, Wins Unconditional Release

Monday, September 27, 2021

A jury found John Hinckley Jr. not guilty by reason of insanity in 1982. On Monday, his lawyer said the "momentous event" of Hinckley's full release in June is appropriate and required by the law.

Comment

The Department Of Justice Monitors For Partisan State Election Audits

Friday, September 24, 2021

As GOP lawmakers in Arizona reviewed the 2020 election results, the Justice Department cautioned them to follow federal law. It is part of a broader federal effort to protect the right to vote.

Comment

A Legal Debate Has Followed Biden's Vaccine Mandates

Monday, September 20, 2021

Prominent Republicans are threatening to sue over the Biden administration's efforts to use federal power and incentives to mandate vaccines for large employers and healthcare workers.

Comment

FBI Director Testified On How Agents Handled The Larry Nassar Case

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Lawmakers have been critical of how the FBI mishandled the investigation of Larry Nassar. Several prominent gymnasts abused by Nassar are testifying about the case to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Comment

Biden Ended Contracts with Private Prisons. So One May Turn To House Immigrants

Monday, September 13, 2021

A for-profit detention center in Kansas that's been plagued with violence may be trying to do an end run against a presidential executive order by moving to house immigrant detainees.

Comment