Anya Kamenetz

NPR

Anya Kamenetz appears in the following:

Three R's For The Digital Age: Rockets, Robots and Remote Control

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Huan Zhang is captain of the all-girl robotics team at Francis Lewis High School in Fresh Meadows, Queens. She and her teammate Vanessa Lin are firing up their robot for me. It looks a little bit like a milk crate on the go.

"It's going to take a couple minutes ...

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A $15 Million Space Race For Education

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

A rural tribe is living peacefully in the Kalahari desert, free of contact with the modern world. One day, a Coke bottle drops from the sky, fallen from a passing airplane.

The villagers find many uses for this unfamiliar new technology: a firestarter, a musical instrument, a stamp for printing ...

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These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. "I've applied all kinds of places," she says. "Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless."

Then she got a strange letter in the mail. " 'We are writing you with good news,' " she reads to ...

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The NPR Ed Mailbag: Alternative Teacher Certification

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Last week I reported about Indiana's newest teaching license. Called a "career specialist" license, it allows anyone with a BA, a B average, and three years of related work experience to become a middle or high school teacher just by passing a content test.

Overall, one in five teachers ...

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For Teachers, Many Paths Into The Classroom ... Some Say Too Many

Friday, September 12, 2014

Hey, you there. You have a college degree? How'd you like to be a teacher?

Indiana has just approved a license that clears a new pathway to the teaching profession. It allows anyone with a bachelor's degree, a B average and approximately three years of related work experience to ...

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Playgrounds For All Children: Here's How To Find One

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Janna Espinoza's daughter Coraline has hearing loss, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and developmental delays. Nearly 2 years old, she can't sit up, stand, creep or use her hands as a typically developing child does.

Coraline is among an estimated 6.4 million children in the U.S. with a disability. And for these ...

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Q&A: One Student's Educational Saga In New Orleans

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

This year, NPR Ed is reporting on the dramatic changes in the New Orleans school system.

Whitman Wilcox V attended kindergarten through second grade at a neighborhood public school in the Lower Ninth Ward. He had just started the third grade when Hurricane Katrina hit in August 2005. His family ...

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Is Google's Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Kaitlin Morgan says, this year, her school district is going "full Google."

Morgan teaches U.S. and world history and advises the yearbook at Woodlake Union High School in California's Central Valley. At Woodlake, "full Google" means a plan to have one Google Chromebook for every two students by the spring, ...

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Why The Atlanta Testing Scandal Matters

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Once, in a sauna at a Korean spa in Queens, I overheard what sounded like two teachers discussing the cheating practices of a third. "You know how she does it," one said. "She'll lean over a student about to put a wrong answer and whisper, 'Check your work.' "

"Yes, ...

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What Robin Williams Taught Us About Teaching

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Amid all the remembrances today of Robin Williams and the tributes to his many famous roles, among the most commonly invoked are not one, but two memorable portrayals of great teaching.

The phrase "Oh Captain, my Captain" is echoing across Twitter, a line from 1989's Dead Poets Society. ...

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Quiz: Find Your Happy Place

Thursday, August 07, 2014

All this week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Play is a part of healthy development, an integral ingredient in learning, a nostalgic pastime. It's good for your body and your brain.

There's something inherently youthful about play, ...

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Tests That Look Like Video Games

Thursday, August 07, 2014

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Imagine you're playing a computer game that asks you to design a poster for the school fair. You're fiddling with fonts, changing background colors and deciding what activity to feature: Will ...

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Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread From California To New York

Monday, July 28, 2014

Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.

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Medicare's Costs Stabilize, But Its Problems Are Far From Fixed

Monday, July 28, 2014

Medicare's trust fund is projected to have money until 2030, four years longer than predicted last year.

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Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal Developmental Science suggests ...

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Fresh Air Weekend: 'Trans Bodies, Trans Selves,' 'Hard Day's Night,' Arthur Allen

Saturday, July 26, 2014

A new book is a manual for transgender; John Powers reviews the restoration of A Hard Day's Night; Arthur Allen talks about his book The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl.

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Charter Schools, Money And Test Scores

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The University of Arkansas says charters produce a better return on investment. Let's take a closer look.

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Teaching 4-Year-Olds To Feel Better

Monday, July 14, 2014

You're 4 years old, building a block tower. Another kid runs up and knocks it down. What do you do? A) Tell her that's against the rules. B) Go tell a teacher. C) Hit her. D) Start to cry. E) What did you say again?

According to a large ...

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'La Marseillaise' Unmasked: A Bastille Day Puzzler

Monday, July 14, 2014

"The Star Spangled Banner" turns 200 this year, and the attention it's been getting is again a reminder of how difficult it is for many Americans to sing our national anthem.

Not so for the French, who have "La Marseillaise," composed by Claude Joseph ...

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How Private Colleges Are Like Cheap Sushi

Saturday, July 12, 2014

In New York City's East Village, there are a number of hole-in-the-wall spots that advertise sushi at 50 percent off. But I can never bring myself to sample the goods. We're talking about a delicacy flown in from around the world. Marking it down drastically just doesn't sit right. ...

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