Anya Kamenetz

NPR

Anya Kamenetz appears in the following:

Is Google's Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Kaitlin Morgan says, this year, her school district is going "full Google."

Morgan teaches U.S. and world history and advises the yearbook at Woodlake Union High School in California's Central Valley. At Woodlake, "full Google" means a plan to have one Google Chromebook for every two students by the spring, ...

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Why The Atlanta Testing Scandal Matters

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Once, in a sauna at a Korean spa in Queens, I overheard what sounded like two teachers discussing the cheating practices of a third. "You know how she does it," one said. "She'll lean over a student about to put a wrong answer and whisper, 'Check your work.' "

"Yes, ...

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What Robin Williams Taught Us About Teaching

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Amid all the remembrances today of Robin Williams and the tributes to his many famous roles, among the most commonly invoked are not one, but two memorable portrayals of great teaching.

The phrase "Oh Captain, my Captain" is echoing across Twitter, a line from 1989's Dead Poets Society. ...

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Quiz: Find Your Happy Place

Thursday, August 07, 2014

All this week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Play is a part of healthy development, an integral ingredient in learning, a nostalgic pastime. It's good for your body and your brain.

There's something inherently youthful about play, ...

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Tests That Look Like Video Games

Thursday, August 07, 2014

This week, NPR Ed is focusing on questions about why people play and how play relates to learning.

Imagine you're playing a computer game that asks you to design a poster for the school fair. You're fiddling with fonts, changing background colors and deciding what activity to feature: Will ...

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Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread From California To New York

Monday, July 28, 2014

Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.

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Medicare's Costs Stabilize, But Its Problems Are Far From Fixed

Monday, July 28, 2014

Medicare's trust fund is projected to have money until 2030, four years longer than predicted last year. But the fund that pays for disability benefits could run dry just two years from now.

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Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal Developmental Science suggests ...

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Fresh Air Weekend: 'Trans Bodies, Trans Selves,' 'Hard Day's Night,' Arthur Allen

Saturday, July 26, 2014

A new book is a manual for transgender; John Powers reviews the restoration of A Hard Day's Night; Arthur Allen talks about his book The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl.

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Charter Schools, Money And Test Scores

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

The University of Arkansas says charters produce a better return on investment. Let's take a closer look.

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Teaching 4-Year-Olds To Feel Better

Monday, July 14, 2014

You're 4 years old, building a block tower. Another kid runs up and knocks it down. What do you do? A) Tell her that's against the rules. B) Go tell a teacher. C) Hit her. D) Start to cry. E) What did you say again?

According to a large ...

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'La Marseillaise' Unmasked: A Bastille Day Puzzler

Monday, July 14, 2014

"The Star Spangled Banner" turns 200 this year, and the attention it's been getting is again a reminder of how difficult it is for many Americans to sing our national anthem.

Not so for the French, who have "La Marseillaise," composed by Claude Joseph ...

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How Private Colleges Are Like Cheap Sushi

Saturday, July 12, 2014

In New York City's East Village, there are a number of hole-in-the-wall spots that advertise sushi at 50 percent off. But I can never bring myself to sample the goods. We're talking about a delicacy flown in from around the world. Marking it down drastically just doesn't sit right. ...

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The Collapse Of Corinthian Colleges

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Under an agreement with the U.S. Department of Education, Corinthian Colleges will put 85 of its U.S. campuses up for sale and close the remaining dozen. The for-profit college chain operates campuses under the names Heald, Everest and WyoTech. It has more than 70,000 students across North America. It's ...

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Big Data Comes To College

Friday, July 04, 2014

When students at Purdue University are reading their homework assignments, sometimes the assignments are reading them too.

A software program called Course Signals tracks various pieces of information, including the number of points earned in the course and the amount of time the student has spent logged in ...

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The Return Of The One-Room Schoolhouse

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Even if your grandpa didn't walk uphill to school both ways, or have to break the ice on the bucket before fetching a drink with the dipper, you probably have iconic images in your mind of the one-room schoolhouse. It's a storied piece of America's past dating back to the ...

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Asking Kids With Special Needs To Clear The Same Bar

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Jackson Ellis will soon head to fourth grade. Diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, he's been receiving publicly funded services since he was 15 months old. Jackson's mother, Rebecca Ellis, a single parent, has made education advocacy her career. She's fighting to make sure her son gets the help he needs ...

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A Role Model Pipeline For Young Black Men

Monday, June 30, 2014

Young male African-American teacher trainees learn to "embody hope" for their students.

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A 'Death Knell' For Public Sector Unions? Not Yet

Monday, June 30, 2014

One of the last two Supreme Court decisions of this term was billed as a potential "final destruction" or "kill shot" for public sector unions. They seem to have been merely nicked by a bullet.

Harris v. Quinn is a class action suit brought by a group of ...

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Chasing The Elusive 'Quality' In Online Education

Friday, June 27, 2014

Jeff Hellmer is an accomplished jazz pianist who has taught music at the University of Texas at Austin for 27 years. He thinks of himself as more than a teacher, though: "What I would like to do with my teaching is be an ambassador for jazz."

This past spring, in ...

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